News from the World of Photography: August 2017

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Graciela Iturbide talks about going viral, L.A. cholos and shooting Frida Kahlo's bathroom


The Los Angeles Times


Countless photographers hope to produce a single indelible image over the course of their careers, something so unforgettable it is seared onto the collective unconscious. Mexican photographer Graciela Iturbide has made not one but several of these images.

There’s the photograph of a Zapotec woman in a southern Mexican market, her head draped in a crown of iguanas striking a pose. There is the spectral figure of an indigenous Seri woman, clad in a long dress, who floats through the desert clutching only a boom box. And there is the woman, with the seen-it-all stare, having a drink and a smoke in a Mexico City bar — her mortality, and ours, writ large in a mural of a skull that looms large over her shoulder.

There are others who are recognizable too: The Zapotec transgender woman framing her striking features with a mirror. A mask-wearing reveler standing in the middle of a dry field, the party over, out of time.

Iturbide’s images are part of museum collections all over the world, including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in the Bay Area and the Getty Museum in Los Angeles.

Photography in Canada: 1960-2000


National Gallery of Canada
Ottawa, Canada
7 April - 17 September 2018


Experience the diversity of Canadian photographic practice and production from 1960 to 2000 in this exhibition organized by the Canadian Photography Institute of the National Gallery of Canada. Bringing together more than 100 works by 71 artists — including Raymonde April, Edward Burtynsky, Lynne Cohen, Angela Grauerholz, Michael Snow, Jeff Wall and Jin-me Yoon — it explores how the medium articulated the role of art and the artist in an ever-changing world, along with differing ideas of identity, sexuality and community.

Formulated around themes such as conceptual, documentary, urban landscape and portrait, this exhibition celebrates the enormous growth of the practice, collection and display of photography over more than four decades. 

Photographic Treasures from India


BBC

To mark the 70th anniversary of Indian independence, an exhibition of photographs examines some of the earliest documentation of the country.

The Unsung Hero of South African Photography


Aperture


Andrew Tshabangu’s two decades-plus visual repertoire, the best of which was showcased earlier this year at Johannesburg’s Standard Bank Gallery and Gallery MOMO in Footprints, is provocative and ultimately liberating. With its exploration of blackness as a lived, if banal and mundane experience (just as it is with any other racial group), Footprints, which was curated by Thembinkosi Goniwe, is also notable for its simplicity and aching, often sweeping quietness, and clarity. In “The Value of Andrew Tshabangu’s Photography,” an essay in the accompanying monograph, published by Fourthwall Books, the curator, critic and novelist Simon Njami tells us that Tshabangu’s journey began in the place where he was born, namely, South Africa. “While biography is never a trivial part of the analysis of any artist’s work,” Njami writes, “in Tshabangu’s case the contextual elements seem to render fundamental clues to a deeper understanding of his universe.”

PHOTOVILLE returns to Brooklyn Bridge Park 


Brooklyn Bridge Plaza
13-17 September & 21-24 September 2017 


Returning to its iconic location at the Brooklyn Bridge Plaza—located in DUMBO’s Brooklyn Bridge Park beneath the majestic span of the Brooklyn Bridge— Photoville will once again create an immersive photography village populated by 55+ shipping containers repurposed into galleries.

The 2017 festival will present five nights of programming in the Beer Garden, numerous hands-on workshops, an education day for New York City middle and high-school students (proudly supported by the New York City’s Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment), three full days of panel discussions and talks presented next door at St. Ann’s Warehouse, tents with family-friendly photo activities, photo publishers, gear demonstrations, a community photo book store run by Red Hook Editions, tintype portraits by the Penumbra Foundation, and a beer garden with a range of food vendors from Smorgasburg and Brooklyn Brewery beers.

_cindysherman_


Instagram



British Journal of Photography


Swedish organisation Fotografiska is to open a new centre for photography in London’s Whitechapel. The 89,000 sq ft lower ground space plus office, which is located near Whitechapel Gallery, is due to be completed in the second half of 2018, and has been rented by Fotografiska for 15 years (with a break option at 12 years).

“Fotografiska has for a long time been searching for suitable facilities in London, one of the world’s most dynamic cities when it comes to photography,” said Tommy Rönngren, founding partner and chair of the board of Fotografiska London. “Whitechapel, which is one of London’s most dynamic areas, will be a perfect location. It will be really exciting to bring the concept of Fotografiska to London.”

Fotografiska already runs a 59,000 sq ft contemporary photography centre in Stockholm called The Swedish Museum of Photography, which opened in 2010 and shows four major exhibitions per year. Previous exhibitions include solo shows by Guy Bourdin, Sarah Moon, Annie Leibovitz, Lars Tunbjörk and Anders Petersen. The organisation also reportedly signed a lease this summer for all six floors, 45,000 sq ft, of the 281 Park Avenue South building in New York.

Southern Elegy: Photography from the Stephen Reily Collection


Speed Art Museum
Louisville, Kentucky
17 March - 14 October 2017 

 

The Speed Art Museum is pleased to present Southern Elegy: Photography from the Stephen Reily Collection, an exhibition of photographs from the Louisville-based collection of Stephen Reily. Reflecting the complex history of the American South, the images in this exhibition address the themes of loss, ruins, beauty, and violence, through evocative images of the South’s natural landscape, architecture, and residents. Southern Elegy features 75 photographs, chiefly spanning from the 1930s to works from the past decade. The 14 photographers represented include George Barnard, William Christenberry, William Eggleston, Walker Evans, Robert Frank, William Gedney, Frances Benjamin Johnston, Clarence John Laughlin, Russell Lee, Deborah Luster, Sally Mann, Ralph Eugene Meatyard, Robert Polidori, and Doug Rickard.

Having researched the photographers who have documented the American South from the nineteenth century to present day, Reily built a collection on the premise of photography as an elegiac
process, or a poetic form of “capturing loss.” As a medium that records the past, photography provides a means of exploring the contested and difficult history of the South through the documentation of specific moments and places. The South provided artists with a landscape shaped by slavery and the Civil War, and in later decades, discrimination, poverty, violence, and human made disaster. Reily explains, “Southern photography is often inspired by its own sense of captured memory, self-aware of the losses that underlie the landscape before us as well as the losses that will transform it once again.”

Longer Ways to Go: Photography of the American Road


Phoenix Art Museum
Phoenix, Arizona
15 April - 15 October 2017


The most recent collaboration between Phoenix Art Museum and the University of Arizona’s Center for Creative Photography (CCP), Longer Ways to Go: Photography of the American Road delves deep into the complex dialogue that photography can enter into with a subject dear to many. This exhibition explores the symbiotic relationship between photography and the folklore of the American highway, including the emblematic Route 66. Longer Ways juxtaposes photographs from different eras, exploring themes related to travel, ideals of small-town life, the national heritage of westward expansion, and personal freedom.

Autophoto


Fondation Cartier pour l'art Contemporain


Thirty years after the exhibition Hommage à Ferrari, the Fondation Cartier will once again focus its attention on the world of cars with the exhibition Autophoto dedicated to photography’s relationship to the automobile. Since its invention, the automobile has reshaped our landscape, extended our geographic horizons and radically altered our conception of space and time, consequently influencing the approach and practice of photographers.

The exhibition Autophoto will show how the car provided photographers with a new subject, new point of view and new way of exploring the world. Organized in series, it will bring together 500 works made by 100 historic and contemporary artists from around the world including Jacques-Henri Lartigue, Lee Friedlander, Rosângela Renno and Yasuhiro Ishimoto. Capturing the geometric design of roadways, the reflections in a rear-view mirror or our special relationship with this object of desire, these photographers invite us to look at the world of the automobile in a new way. 

BBC


For artists at the dawn of the 20th Century, the modern world must have seemed like a bright, shiny and inspiring place. Think of FT Marinetti, whose rhapsodic Futurist Manifesto, published in 1909, extolled factories and shipyards, bridges and railway stations, locomotives and racing cars. “A roaring car that seems to ride on grapeshot is more beautiful than the Victory of Samothrace,” he wrote. 

By the time of the artistic maturity of the US photographer Walker Evans (1903-75), though, much of that seductive appeal had worn off. As an important retrospective of more than 400 artworks at the Pompidou Centre in Paris reveals, Evans, unlike Marinetti, was no cheerleader for modernity.

In a way, this is surprising, since the show suggests that Evans’ photographic career began conventionally enough, as a budding modernist. Indebted to formal innovations by avant-garde photographers such as the Russian Alexander Rodchenko, Evans’ boldly framed early pictures, from the late 1920s, eulogised New York’s awe-inspiring architecture. Like many others, he felt compelled to photograph Brooklyn Bridge and Broadway...

The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now


Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery
Washington DC
7 April 2017 - 28 January 2018


Since September 11, 2001, the United States has been engaged in multiple wars, varying in intensity, locale, and consequence.  After fifteen years, this warfare has become normalized into our social and cultural landscape; it is ongoing, yet somehow out of sight, invisible.

The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now explores and assesses the human costs of ongoing wars through portraiture. The exhibition title is drawn from John Keegan’s classic military history, which reorients our view of war from questions of strategy and tactics to its personal and individual toll. Featuring fifty-six works by six artists, the exhibition includes photographs by Ashley Gilbertson, Tim Hetherington, Louie Palu, and Stacy Pearsall; site-specific installation of drawings by Emily Prince; and paintings, sculpture, and time-based media by Vincent Valdez.

With this poignant exhibition, the National Portrait Gallery will put a face on recent wars through the work of artists who have pictured the experience of common soldiers. The Face of Battle will also bring to public attention the latest formal developments in the field of portraiture as practiced by a diverse and talented group of artists. The exhibition will place the focus on the identity and experiences of ordinary soldiers who fought and continue to fight for our nation.



lensculture


Belgian photographer Nick Hannes has been pursuing independent documentary projects for over a decade. His travels (and curiosity) have taken him across the 15 former Soviet Republics as well as all around the Mediterranean Sea, and yet his latest work focuses on a completely different part of the world: the city of Dubai.

In the series, titled “Bread and Circuses,” he focuses on leisure and consumerism in one of the capitals of extravagant consumption. Through his camera, he focuses on the bizarre peculiarities of this unique city—his hope is to tell a more universal story about humanity’s relationship to pleasure and entertainment.

LensCulture managing editor Alexander Strecker reached out to Hannes to find out more about his project and Hannes’ process. Below is an edited transcript of their exchange...

Gösta Peterson, Barrier-Breaking Fashion Photographer, Dies at 94


The New York Times

Gösta Peterson, a self-taught photographer who made fashion history with his magazine covers of a once-spurned black model, Naomi Sims, and an androgynous British waif nicknamed Twiggy, died in Manhattan. He was 94.


AnOther

At first glance, Kate Ballis’ candy-coloured landscapes are reminiscent of the hand-tinted photographs that were prevalent in the mid-19th century, but these gorgeous popsicle-palette images were created with the aid of a specially converted infrared camera as opposed to a paintbrush. “I first came across the technique at the Venice Biennale in 2013, where Richard Mosse had used the process to represent the violent conflict in the Eastern Republic of Congo,” she explains. “In his work it seems like he’s subverting these horrors and creating something aesthetically beautiful.”

No Longer Seeing the World Through Men’s Eyes


The New York Times LENS Blog

The first Women Photograph grants to support personal projects by female visual journalists have been presented to Alex Potter, Lujan Agusti, Gabriella Demczuk and Néha Hirve. Women Photograph, a new organization, aims to help women gain opportunities in an industry that has historically been dominated by white men and has been rife with sexism.

Most new photography grants or awards are announced with great fanfare promising long-term impact. But if Women Photograph succeeds in helping visual storytellers, there may eventually be no need for it, said Daniella Zalcman, a freelance photographer who founded the group.

“In some perfect world of the future, half of working photojournalists will be women and there will not need to be grants for photographers of color or female photographers,” she said. “But right now, as we work to level the playing field, we absolutely need to create intentional opportunities to address the huge imbalances in the photojournalism community.”

The group’s website and database features 550 female and female-identifying photographers from 87 countries who are available for editorial assignments and have more than five years of professional experience. They have been advocating for more jobs and editorial assignments for women photographers from leading publications, and its private Facebook group has become a forum to exchange professional tips and occasionally to discuss instances of sexual harassment and gender bias...

Elliott Erwitt in Hungary


Magyar Fotográfusok Háza
Budapest, Hungary
15 June - 10 September 2017

 

Elliott Erwitt, the world-renowned photographer took pictures of Hungary in 1964. A selection of these images will be showcased for the first time in Hungary at the Mai Manó House in the summer of 2017.