News from the World of Photography: August 2018

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Life and Dreams: Contemporary Chinese Photography and Media Art


The Walther Collection
Neu-Ulm, Germany
Until 18 November 2018

 

The Walther Collection presents Life and Dreams: Contemporary Chinese Photography and Media Art, the first extensive exhibition of works by Chinese artists represented in The Walther Collection. Featuring forty-three artists, Life and Dreams showcases a wide range of groundbreaking photography and media art produced by internationally recognized figures such as Yang Fudong, Zhang Peili, Ai Weiwei, Song Dong, Cao Fei, and Zhang Huan during an era of momentous social and economic change. It also incorporates new acquisitions and selected loans of significant media art by innovative younger artists such as Sun Xun, Lu Yang, and Cheng Ran to provide an up-to-the-minute account of the main directions and key achievements in contemporary Chinese photography and media art during the past three decades.

This Land


Pier 24
San Francisco, CA
1 June 2018 - 31 March 2019

This Land focuses on work made throughout the United States within the past decade. The photographers assembled here examine aspects of the country’s current social climate, from the mundane to the politicized.

The exhibition’s title is drawn from Woody Guthrie’s song “This Land Is Your Land” (1940). Viewed by many as an alternative national anthem, it alludes to the uneasy tensions fundamental to our vision of this nation filled with promise and peril, possibilities and letdowns. At the bottom of the sheet of paper on which Guthrie handwrote the song’s lyrics, he noted, “all you can write is what you see.” The artists included in this exhibition use cameras rather than pens, creating photographs that speak to what they see in the United States today.

Lucas Foglia: Human Nature


Museum of Contemporary Photography (MoCP)
Columbia College, Chicago, IL
19 July - 30 September 2018

 

The relationship between humans and nature is both symbiotic and fraught. In the present era of climate change, scientists and conservationists are scrambling to find solutions to myriad challenges such as resource depletion, ecosystem transformation, overpopulation, and species extinction. As our destruction of the natural world becomes more pervasive, our interactions with wilderness are in turn increasingly restrained, and the experiences we do have with nature often occur in human-made environments. In fact, we are spending more time than ever indoors, even as social science research indicates that a connection to nature is vital to our well-being.

Lucas Foglia (American, b. 1983) is interested in these complexities, and particularly in disputing the notion that people and nature are at odds. He began his project Human Nature (2006–16) in order to probe our relationship to the wilderness and to explore our fundamental need to commune with nature. With the skills of a seasoned photographer, and often with a touch of humor, he documents leisure activities, exploration, and some of the science behind climate change—often in remote locations. 

China Is Still Sorting Through Its Colorful Bike-Share Graveyards


The Atlantic

 In March, author Alan Taylor posted “The Bike-Share Oversupply in China: Huge Piles of Abandoned and Broken Bicycles,” showing just some of the millions of bicycles that had been rapidly built and dumped into Chinese cities by bike-share companies looking to get in on the next big thing, only to crash hard. In the months since, more of those bike-share startups have gone bankrupt or consolidated, and the bicycle graveyards remain. Municipal governments are still wrangling with the fallout, confiscating derelict or illegally parked bikes, crafting new laws, and working out what to do with millions of abandoned bicycles. In a few cases, plans have been announced to refurbish and distribute some of the bikes to smaller neighboring towns, in others, wholesale recycling has begun, and bicycles are being crushed into cubes. The scale of the situation was so large to begin with, it will be a long time before the bicycle graveyards fade away.
 

Pentti Sammallahti, Finland’s top photographer


The Economist

Under a low sun, a frog with a thuggish expression swims alone in a pond, its black reflection a crisply outlined mirror image on the still water. It stares straight ahead; an eye-to-eye confrontation seems imminent. This sinister yet amusing picture was taken by Pentti Sammallahti, a 68-year-old Finnish photographer with an unusual status: he is at once feted and deliberately low-profile.

His modest prices—prints start at €600 ($702)—are part of the explanation. Peter Fetterman, who exhibited Mr Sammallahti’s work at the Masterpiece fair in London this month, says he “is the best photographer whose work you can afford.”...

Artist Collier Schorr on the Medium and the Message


AnOther

After 20 years of making pictures that span fashion, art and collage Collier Schorr’s studio is, predictably, a bit of a mess. “[It’s] small, and in disarray,” she tells me, smiling, before the opening of her new solo exhibition, In Front of the Camera at London’s Modern Art gallery. “It’s constantly being cleaned, and then I do collages for a fashion story, and it becomes a complete hellhole of scraps of paper. And what happens then is that pictures float around and get mixed up and get lost and get found years later.”...


IPPAWARDS

The iPhone Photography Awards (IPPAWARDS) is proud to announce the winners of the 11th Annual Awards. This year’s winners were selected from thousands of entries submitted by iPhone photographers from over 140 countries around the world...

The First Photograph


Harry Ransom Center
The University of Texas at Austin

The First Photograph, or more specifically, the earliest known surviving photograph made in a camera, was taken by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826 or 1827. The image depicts the view from an upstairs window at Niépce's estate, Le Gras, in the Burgundy region of France. Learn more about the First Photograph through the links provided on the Harry Ransom Center website.

Overlooked Stories From Latin American Photographers


The New York Times LENS Blog

In the South Bronx’s Melrose neighborhood, second only to Times Square as New York’s busiest, residents may soon find plenty of reasons to stop and enjoy the view.

Hustling to the subway or bustling among shoppers on tightly packed sidewalks, they can happen upon arresting new sights: images of life in Latin America and the Caribbean, mounted on a chain-link fence along a sidewalk, arrayed in a community garden or displayed on the grounds of Immaculate Conception School.

Melrose is becoming a gallery, inside and out. For its Latin American Foto Festival, the Bronx Documentary Center is again sharing photography with the community it calls home. The festival, running July 12 to 22, busts past the white walls of exhibition spaces with eight installations, seven beyond the center.  

Photo essays from more than a dozen acclaimed and emerging documentary photographers from Colombia, Peru, Ecuador, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and Mexico, as well as contributions from FotoKids, which teaches photography to Guatemalan children, will hang in and outside neighborhood landmarks and city streets...  

Cortona on the Move: International Photography Festival


Cortona On The Move
Cortona, Italy
12 July - 30 September 2018


Founded in 2011 by the Associazione Culturale ONTHEMOVE, the principal objective of Cortona On The Move is to spread and promote contemporary photography by bringing new creative talents and novel forms of visual communication to the forefront.

Under the artistic direction of Arianna Rinaldo, the festival provides a continuing exchange between field experts and a ceaseless search for work which represents the ongoing evolution of the photographic language, all showcased within the enchanting Etruscan hilltown of Cortona.

Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings


Peabody Essex Museum
Salem, Massachusetts
30 June - 23 September 2018

For more than forty years, Sally Mann has made experimental and hauntingly beautiful images that have made her one of the country’s most influential and distinguished photographers. The artist’s first major traveling exhibition, Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings, explores themes of family, memory, mortality, and home as well as the Southern landscape as repository of personal and collective memory. Some 115 photographs — many of which have not been exhibited or published previously — offer a sweeping overview of Mann’s artistic achievement, vision, and drive.

Here Sarah Kennel, PEM's Byrne Family Curator of Photography, talks about the pioneering artist and the enduring power of photography to tell important stories...

How Amy Arbus Confronted the Death of Her Mother, Diane


AnOther

In 1992, Amy Arbus took a masterclass with Richard Avedon at the International Center of Photography in New York and embarked on a project that would forever change her relationship to the medium. She took a single roll of black and white self-portraits in a bathtub, where she began to confront and consider the death of her mother Diane Arbus, who committed suicide in one on July 26, 1971.

Then 38 years old, it had been 21 years since her mother’s death, and Arbus set about revisiting a scene she had never witnessed herself. The result was an intense series of eight photographs, which will be on view in Tub Pictures at The Schoolhouse Gallery in Provincetown, MA, from next week until August 8, 2018. We caught up with Arbus to discuss this powerful body of work, and the ways in which it transformed her life...


New Mexico Museum of Art
Santa Fe, New Mexico
Until 4 November 2018


Shifting Light offers a twenty-first century perspective on the museum’s long-term engagement with the popular medium of photography. Organized into the broad categories of land and place, culture and identity, community and interconnection, and vision and creativity, the exhibition juxtaposes photographs in ways that amplify their meanings and suggest new narratives. Ansel Adams’ famous 1940 photograph Moonrise, Hernandez is paired with a 1975 landscape by Thomas Barrow from his series Cancellations, while Alfred Stieglitz’s 1918 portrait of Georgia O’Keeffe keeps company with images by Anne Noggle and Joyce Neimanas.

Christie's

A landmark sale features rare examples of works by 19th and 20th-century American masters of the medium, including Alfred Stieglitz, Edward Steichen, Dorothea Lange, Edward Weston, Paul Strand and many more...
 
On 4 and 5 October, key works by Steiglitz will be offered at Christie’s in New York in a dedicated sale, An American Journey: The Diann G. and Thomas A. Mann Collection of Photographic Masterworks. The Mann Collection contains his most iconic works from the Photo-Secessionist period, printed as oversized photogravures; each example is signed and mounted. 
 
Included in the sale are prints of The Terminal (1892), The Hand of Man (1902), and the artists’ own print of The Steerage (1907). Perhaps Steiglitz’s most frequently reproduced photograph, The Steerage was exhibited in both the 1917 Society of Independent Artists’ show in New York and the 1944 Philadelphia Museum of Art exhibition that surveyed his work and personal collection.

These key prints come to auction alongside rare examples of works by Steiglitz’s counterparts in the Photo-Secession, including Edward Steichen, Gertrude Käsebier and Clarence White, and Modernist masterworks by Edward Weston, Paul Strand 
and Charles Sheeler.

SFMOMA
San Francisco, CA
21 July - 21 October 2018 


From war and human rights to cultural identity and domestic violence, Susan Meiselas’s (American, b. 1948) work covers a wide range of subjects and countries. This retrospective brings together projects from the beginning of her career in the 1970s to the present day, including her iconic portraits of carnival strippers, vivid color images of the conflicts in Central America in the 1980s, and an ongoing investigation into the history and aftermath of the Kurdish genocide.

A member of Magnum Photos since 1976, Meiselas creates work that raises provocative questions about documentary practice, and the relationship between photographer and subject. The exhibition highlights her unique working method, combining photography, video, sound, and installation to explore different scales of time and conflict, ranging from the personal to the geopolitical.

The Los Angeles Times

In the early 1970s, a decade into shooting conflicts around the world, Don McCullin said in the exhibition catalog "The Concerned Photographer 2": "I haven't got very much longer to go at being a war photographer. I mean the chips are down already."

And yet a few years ago, at 80, McCullin could be found in Iraq, camera in hand.

McCullin is a giant in the field of war reportage, though you'd barely know it from his show at the Hauser & Wirth gallery in Los Angeles. Billed as the London-born, Somerset-based photojournalist's first gallery exhibition in the U.S., it's more missed opportunity than proper introduction. At just under 30 pictures, it presents a thin slice — more frosting than cake — of a broad and deep career chronicling military, political, social and economic strife...
Tate Modern
London, UK
Until 14 October 2018


Shape of Light is the first major exhibition to explore the relationship between the two, spanning the century from the 1910s to the present day. It brings to life the innovation and originality of photographers over this period, and shows how they responded and contributed to the development of abstraction. 
 
Key photographs are brought together from pioneers including Man Ray and Alfred Stieglitz, major contemporary artists such as Barbara Kasten and Thomas Ruff, right up to exciting new work by Antony Cairns, Maya Rochat and Daisuke Yokota, made especially for the exhibition.

News from the World of Photography: July 2018

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News from the World of Photography: June 2018

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Elliott Erwitt: Pittsburgh 1950


International Center of Photography (ICP) Museum
New York, NY
23 May - 2 September 2018


In 1950 Elliott Erwitt, then just twenty-two years old, set out to capture Pittsburgh’s transformation from an industrial city into a modern metropolis. Commissioned by Roy Stryker, the mastermind behind the large-scale documentary photography projects launched by the US government during the Great Depression, Erwitt shot hundreds of frames. His images recorded the city’s communities against the backdrop of urban change, highlighting his quiet observations with the playful wit that has defined his style for over five decades. After only four months, Erwitt was drafted into the army and sent to Germany, leaving his negatives behind in Stryker’s Pittsburgh Photographic Library. The negatives remained at the Pennsylvania Department of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh for decades. This exhibition, organized by Assistant Curator Claartje van Dijk in association with the photographer, will present these images in the United States for the first time.  

The book Pittsburgh: 1950 is available for purchase in the ICP Museum shop for the duration of the show.

It Was an Ad? So What. It’s Still Art.


The New York Times

In the hills high above Los Angeles, within the white-columned serenity of the J. Paul Getty Museum, the bastard stepchild of the fine art world is finally getting its birthright.

On Tuesday, June 26, “Icons of Style: A Century of Fashion Photography, 1911-2011” opens, and it may be the most sweeping such survey in decades, featuring 198 works (pictures, magazine covers, ad campaigns, garments) throughout eight galleries and spanning images both obvious and unknown.

Richard Avedon’s “Dovima With Elephants,” the 1955 print of a Dior evening gown amid the pachyderms, which the show’s curator said became the most expensive fashion photograph sold at auction when it went for over $1 million at Christie’s in 2010? It’s in there. Erwin Blumenfeld’s photo of Lisa Fonssagrives in a Lucien Lelong dress hanging off the side of the Eiffel Tower, the poster on many a dorm room wall? That, too. Ditto for Bruce Weber’s 1982 Calvin Klein underwear ad featuring a briefs-clad Tom Hintnaus silhouetted against a white adobe structure in the shape of a phallus. Once upon a time, it stopped traffic in Times Square...

Visions d’Artistes – Pictorialist Photographs, 1890-1960


The Eye of Photography

From June 16th to September 16th, the museum Nicéphore Niépce in Chalon-sur-Saône devotes a large exhibition to a major chapter in the history of photography, pictorialism.

The ambition of this international aesthetic movement born around 1890 was to make the creative potential of the photographic image admitted by producing art pictures.

Never a Lovely So Real: Photography and Film in Chicago, 1950–1980


Art Institute Chicago
Chicago, IL
Until 28 October 2018

 In his 1951 book Chicago: City on the Make, Nelson Algren offered bittersweet praise for the city: “Like loving a woman with a broken nose, you may well find lovelier lovelies. But never a lovely so real.” This unique character—fraught with affection, tension, and contradiction—is revealed in the work of the many photographers and filmmakers who documented Chicago in the second half of the 20th century as cultural, social, and political events transformed the city. These artists focused on Chicago’s history as a city of neighborhoods, many of them fiercely segregated and separated from one another. Together, they constructed a portrait of Chicago that speaks equally to its allure and its haunting brutality.

Drawn largely from the Art Institute’s collection, this exhibition highlights the work of artists who through their images and films captured the life of their own communities or those to which they were granted intimate access as outsiders. Featured among them is a network of photographers who focused on Chicago’s South Side during a period coinciding with the emergence of the city’s Black Arts Movement. Billy Abernathy, Darryl Cowherd, Bob Crawford, Roy Lewis, and Robert A. Sengstacke all produced work in connection with the revolutionary Bronzeville mural, the Wall of Respect (1967–71). Other projects, such as Mikki Ferrill’s decade-long documentation of an improvised South Side club, The Garage (1970/80), and two of Gordon Parks’s Life magazine assignments (1953 and 1963), likewise underscore the role played by Chicago as a national center of black culture and politics.

 

Ursula Schulz-Dornburg: The Land In-Between– Photographs from 1980 to 2012


Stadel Museum
Frankfurt, Germany
Until 9 September 2018
 

The photographer Ursula Schulz-Dornburg (b. 1938) has been devoting herself to border landscapes, places of transit and relics of past cultures for more than forty years. With the aid of thirteen extensive workgroups and altogether more than 200 works, the Städel Museum is offering the first comprehensive institutional survey of the artist’s oeuvre ever in the exhibition Ursula Schulz-Dornburg: The Land In-Between – Photographs from 1980 to 2012, to be presented from 4 July to 9 September 2018. Schulz-Dornburg, who was born in Berlin and now lives in Düsseldorf, devotes herself in her photos to cult and culture sites in Europe, Asia and the Near East, and above all to the visible and invisible borders of these continents and regions. Her analogue black-and-white photographs are testimonies to no-longer-existing landscapes, past political systems, cultural milieus in the process of dissolution, and expiring societies. Distinguished by ethnological curiosity and an archaeological perspective, the images are on the interfaces between documentarism and political photography, between concept art and a sense of the responsibility to provide insight. Schulz-Dornburg is interested in the marks human beings have left behind in the landscape in the course of lengthy historical processes, as well as in recent political changes of the kind brought about, for example, by the Golf Wars (between 1980 and 2003).

Paul Arden Collection – Through the Eyes of Four Photographers

 

The Eye of Photography

Through the Eyes of Four Photographers features works by Brian Griffin, Andrew Holligan, Bruce Rae and Gerry Castle.

Four seemingly diverse photographers have been brought together by the discerning eye of the late Paul Arden, Creative Director of Saatchi and Saatchi, a friend and collaborator with all four.

The show includes works from Paul and his wife Toni’s personal collection, assembled over three decades, plus some new works from these photographers.


Ocean Gallery, UCSB
Santa Barbara, CA
Through 31 August


The photos are chilling: Giant swathes of devastation in the Brazilian Amazon. Men hip-deep in the brown muck of the gouged and flooded earth. They are the scenes of illegal gold mining in Garimpeiros: The Wildcat Gold Miners of the Amazon Rainforest, an exhibition in the Ocean Gallery of the UC Santa Barbara Library through Aug. 31.

Curated by Jeffrey Hoelle, an associate professor of anthropology, and Jonathan Rissmeyer, library senior artist, the exhibit of 42 photos explores the world of wildcat miners, or 
garimpeiros, who try to make a living scratching gold out of the rainforest...

Aftermath Project: War is Only Half the Story


Los Angeles Public Library
Los Angeles, CA
22 June - 19 August 2018


War is Only Half the Story is a ten-year retrospective of the work of the groundbreaking documentary photography program, The Aftermath Project. Founded to help change the way the media covers conflict- and to educate the public about the true cost of war and the real price of peace- The Aftermath Project has discovered some of the most groundbreaking photographers in the world working on post-conflict themes. War is Only Half the Story tells the incredibly moving stories of the people left behind after the cameras have moved on from a war zone. Drawing on photographs from over fifty photographers, these personal and often poetic post-war views unveil not only another side to the devastating effects of war, but also tells the stories of people coming together to rebuild and heal. The exhibit illuminates and defines our humanity while giving visibility to those coping with the lingering ramifications of conflict.

Peter Hujar: Speed of Life


BAMPFA
Berkeley, CA
30 June - 18 November 2018 

Peter Hujar (1934–1987), a prominent figure in the downtown New York art scene in the 1970s and 1980s, is best known for his intimate, searching, and playful portraits of artists, writers, and performers, including Susan Sontag, William S. Burroughs, David Wojnarowicz, and the masters of drag theater. Private by nature, combative in manner, well read, and widely connected, Hujar inhabited the downtown world of avant-garde dance, music, art, and performance. His mature career paralleled the public unfolding of gay life between the Stonewall uprising in 1969 and the AIDS crisis of the 1980s.

In his loft studio in the East Village, Hujar focused on those who followed their creative instincts and shunned mainstream success. He made, in his words, “uncomplicated, direct photographs of complicated and difficult subjects,” immortalizing moments, landscapes, individuals, and subcultures passing at the speed of life.

Peter Hujar: Speed of Life presents more than one hundred photographs by this enormously important and influential artist. The pictures, in this first retrospective of the artist’s work, chart Hujar’s career from his beginnings in the mid-1950s to his central role in the East Village art scene three decades later.

Susan Meiselas: Breaching Boundaries in Photography


The New York Times LENS Blog

Susan Meiselas, who joined Magnum Photos in 1976, is also the president and co-founder of the Magnum Foundation.  Born in 1948 and starting as a teacher in the South Bronx, she went on to produce a definitive chronicle of Nicaragua’s Sandinista revolution. More recently, she has led the foundation’s efforts to nurture a new, diverse generation of photographers. Her books include “Carnival Strippers,” “Nicaragua,” and “Prince Street Girls.” In the last year, she has also been the subject of two books, “Susan Meiselas: Mediations” (Damiani) and “Susan Meiselas: On the Frontline” (Thames & Hudson). She spoke with James Estrin about her career. The conversation has been edited for clarity and length...

Arles: Archive and found photography sweeps the board in the 2018 Prix du Livre


The British Journal of Photography

From a series of diptychs designed to stimulate senile dementia patients to - controversially - an alternative take on Bertolt Brecht's War Primer which was first published in 2011, Arles' book awards went to images from the archives.

Three winners and one special mention have been announced for the 2018 Prix du Livre at Rencontres d’Arles – and in all four cases, the books use archival or found photography. The Author Book Award went to Laurence Aëgerter’s 'Photographic Treatment', which is published by Dewi Lewis; the Historical book award went to 'The Pigeon Photographer', a collection of images by Julius Neubronner published by Rorhof; and – controversially – the Photo-text Book Award went to Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin’s 'War Primer 2', which was first published by MACK in 2011 but reissued in paperback this year. A special mention went to Giorgio Di Noto’s 'The Iceberg' in the Author Book Award, which is published by Édition Patrick Frey...

Exploring Hollywood’s Sinister Underbelly, with Artist Alex Prager


AnOther

California’s palm-lined streets, intense sunshine and abundant blue skies are embedded in our cultural consciousness. The city is the epitome of the American dream, imbued with cinematic characteristics and symbolising the promise of perfection. It attracts those seeking reinvention, or who simply desire to become something they are not – but buried just beneath this fantasy lies a potent sense of unease and existential dread.

This tension is the lifeblood of Alex Prager’s practice. Her large-scale film and photographic works
utilise the tricks and tools of Hollywood to expertly portray the haunting side of the human psyche. “The city itself was built on artifice,” she tells AnOther. “It’s a strange alternative
reality. There is perfection on the surface, but the underbelly is right there and if you dip your toe in just a little bit, it gets ugly, weird and strange. I’m constantly examining these hidden layers.” ...


British Journal of Photography

'Snapdragon' is a revelation, a unique telling of a unique man’s early life. It is told in large part by Phil Stern, the young man himself, but with all the supporting detail and the rest of the story filled in by his biographer Liesl Bradner.

Phil Stern led a very adventurous life. By age 21 he was already a Life magazine photographer shooting pictures of Hollywood stars. But when WW2 began he volunteered for the army and became a member of Darby’s Rangers, now famed for their exploits in Africa and Sicily but then a newly formed and untested combat unit. Because he joined them as a serviceman and not as a correspondent he had the unique opportunity to photograph the troops and the fighting as an insider in the thick of it. They saw him as one of them too and named him Snapdragon. For the next two years Phil was there for it all and he pictured it in detail. Then in 1943 he was wounded a second time and sent back stateside. Once back he wrote of the life he had lived and the men he had known. His stories, told with his memories fresh and a fine photographer’s eye for detail are as absorbing and present as if what he was writing about had happened earlier in the day...

View Finder: Landscape and Leisure in the Collection


Museum of Contemporary Photography (MoCP)
Chicago, IL
19 July - 30 September 2018


Photography has played a vital role in our understanding of the outdoors, allowing us to view natural spaces without being physically present in them. Parks fill a similar role, as they provide institutional access points and infrastructure into wild, natural spaces. In his book Our National Parks (1901), John Muir, cofounder of the Sierra Club, wrote: “Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, overcivilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wildness is a necessity; and that mountain parks and reservations are useful not only as fountains of timber and irrigating rivers, but as fountains of life.” Presenting a selection of historical and contemporary works from the MoCP’s permanent collection and the Midwest Photographers Project, View Finder: Landscape and Leisure in the Collection considers the varied ways these designated outdoor spaces enhance human experience, from allowing for rest and refuge to their ability to meet other, more subliminal needs.


Chrysler Museum of Art
Norfolk, VA
6 April - 12 August 2018


The show spans photographic history—from 19th-century daguerreotypes for which subjects sat immobilized during the early camera’s long exposure time to contemporary photographs that use special lights and mechanics to capture multiple moments in a single frame. In addition to a technical story about the camera’s ability to freeze a slice of time, the show highlights works that make time their subject, investigating notions of permanence and decay, history and memory and essence and accident. The exhibition will include works by Harold Edgerton, Vera Lutter, William Christenberry and many others.

Philadelphia Museum of Art
Philadelphia, PA
21 April - 19 August 2018 


Trial and error reveals unexpected results.

Photography distills the flow of time into singular, still moments. The artists in this installation stop, extend, and rearrange time for their own creative ends, whether to convey personal memories, render visible overlooked aspects of nature, contemplate mortality, or document the passage of time. Through their unique approaches to capturing motion, they encourage us to look at what may and may not be in plain view.

Boca Raton Museum of Art
Boca Raton, FL
24 April - 21 October 2018


Lisette Model (1901-1983) is one of the most influential street photographers, best known for her direct portrayal of the peculiarities of average people captured candidly in everyday situations. She was born in Vienna and discovered photography when she moved to Paris and joined André Kertész’s circle. In 1937 she decided to become a photographer and the next year she immigrated to New York City. Model’s work appeared regularly in publications such as Harper’s Bazaar and her work was included in an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in 1940. She was also an influential artist and teacher who famously taught Diane Arbus.
Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO)
Ontario, Canada
28 April 2018 - 14 April 2019


The First World War is recognized as a period of mass violence and destruction, but also as a beginning. The war ushered in technological innovation, mechanizing and recording war in ways previously impossible. The growing pervasiveness of photography resulted in a conflict well-documented by military officials, press agencies, and amateurs alike.

The Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) holds nearly 500 albums from this period, a unique and extensive collection donated in 2004 by a private collector. The albums reveal different aspects of the relationship between warfare and photography; retrospectively, all of them—personal, official, and commercial—engage in a dialogue with history by presenting unique visual narratives that uphold or challenge historical perceptions of war. The breadth of albums and accounts—British, French, German, Canadian, Austrian, American, Australian, Italian, Czech, and Russian—expose the multiplicities of experience as well as the commonalities of war.

Adjacent to the main display, the McEwen Gallery will showcase works by Australian war photographer James Francis “Frank” Hurley (1885–1962), who was on official assignment throughout World War I. His album Australian Units on the Western Front (1916–1918) presents a series of compelling photographs, each offering views of different aspects of life on the Front. Soldiers, in action and at ease, are pictured, as well as the grimmer realities of war: casualties, scorched landscapes, and destroyed architecture. The album—disassembled for the exhibition—highlights Hurley’s skill as a photographer and features a rich breadth of imagery.

These exhibitions present visitors with a rich opportunity to explore these photographic objects that construct a history of aerial technology and photography, which influenced the operation and outcome of the First World War, a visual record of war that is often left unseen. Together, they contributed to the beginning of a visual consciousness of war that resonates to this day.

News from the World of Photography: May 2018

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Not an Ostrich: And Other Images from America's Library


Annenberg Space for Photography 
Los Angeles, CA
21 April - 9 September 2018


Not an Ostrich: And Other Images from America’s Library is the result of celebrated American photography curator Anne Wilkes Tucker’s excavation of nearly 500 images—out of a collection of over 14 million—permanently housed at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. While visitors to the exhibition might never see an ostrich, they will see the image entitled “Not an Ostrich” and a large selection of rare and handpicked works from the vaults of the world’s largest library, many never widely available to the public.

This exhibition spans across the history of photography—from daguerreotypes, the first photographic process, to contemporary digital prints. Iconic portraits of Abraham Lincoln, John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Cesar Chavez, and Elizabeth Taylor appear alongside unusual images, such as, Stanley Kubrick’s “Strong Man’s Family” (1947), John Vachon’s “Ice Fishing, Minnesota” (1956), Susana Raab’s “Chicken in Love, Athens, OH” (2006) and Nina Berman’s “Flammable Faucet #4, Monroeton, PA” (2011). Vivid color portrayals of America, across time, are highlighted in juxtapositions of popular travel views from the late 19th century, created by the Detroit Publishing Company using the then-latest “photochrom” technology, on a screen next to striking contemporary scenes captured by Carol M. Highsmith.

David Douglas Duncan,102, Who Photographed the Reality of War, Dies

The New York Times

Under the helmets, the faces are young and tormented, stubbled and dirty, taut with the strain of battle. They sob over dead friends. They stare exhausted into the fog and rain. They crouch in a muddy foxhole. This goddamn cigarette could be the last. There are no heroes in David Douglas Duncan’s images of war.

Dark and brooding, mostly black and white, they are the stills of a legendary combat photographer, an artist with a camera, who brought home to America the poignant lives of infantrymen and fleeing civilians caught up in World War II, the Korean conflict and the war in Vietnam.

“I felt no sense of mission as a combat photographer,” Mr. Duncan, who was wounded several times, told The New York Times in 2003. “I just felt maybe the guys out there deserved being photographed just the way they are, whether they are running scared, or showing courage, or diving into a hole, or talking and laughing. And I think I did bring a sense of dignity to the battlefield.”...

Winslow Homer and the Camera: Photography and the Art of Painting


Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Brunswick, ME
23 June - 28 October 2018

 

This exhibition explores the question of Homer’s relationship with the medium of photography and its impact on his artistic practice. As one attuned to appearances and how to represent them, Homer understood that photography, as a new technology of sight, had much to reveal. This exhibition thus adds an important new dimension to our appreciation of this pioneering American painter, demonstrating his recognition that photography did not undermine, but instead complemented his larger artistic interests.

Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Decisive Moment


International Center of Photography
New York, NY
23 May - 2 September 2018

 Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Decisive Moment examines Cartier-Bresson’s influential publication, widely considered to be one of the most important photobooks of the twentieth century. Pioneering for its emphasis on the photograph itself as a unique narrative form, The Decisive Moment was described by Robert Capa as “a Bible for photographers.” Originally titled Images à la Sauvette (“images on the run”) in the French, the book was published in English with a new title, The Decisive Moment, which unintentionally imposed the motto which would define Cartier-Bresson’s work. The exhibition details how the decisions made by the collaborators in this major project—including Cartier-Bresson, French art publisher Tériade, American publisher Simon & Schuster, and Henri Matisse, who designed the book’s cover—have shaped our understanding of Cartier-Bresson’s photographs. Through vintage gelatin silver prints, first-edition publications, periodicals, and correspondence, Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Decisive Moment brings new insights to this iconic work. 

Portfolio Showcase 11: Exhibition & Publication


The Center for Fine Art Photography
Fort Collins, CO
13 June - 7 July 2018
ARTISTS

Laura J. Bennett – Solo Exhibition Winner
JoAnn Carney
Teri Havens
Sharon Kain
Michael Knapstein
Melissa Lazuka
Florian Mueller
David Pace and Stephen Wirtz
Laura Pannack
Jerry Takigawa

What Is Art Photography? Catherine Edelman Offers Her Opinion

LensCulture

Debuting with the Ballad of Sexual Dependency by Nan Goldin in 1987, Catherine Edelman Gallery has been a leader in the fine art world for more than thirty years. Representing artists like Bruce Davidson, Michael Kenna, Joel-Peter Witkin, Jess T. Dugan and many more, the gallery is a respected institution in the US and beyond. In the past, the gallery has shown a wide variety of work, including documentary photography (Susan Meiselas, James Nachtwey), fashion photography (Annie Leibovitz, Herb Ritts), and traditional landscape photographs (Michael Kenna)...


National Portrait Gallery
London, UK
7 March - 27 May 2019 

A major new exhibition of works by Martin Parr, one of Britain’s best-known and most widely celebrated photographers. Only Human: Martin Parr, brings together some of Parr’s best-known photographs with a number of works never exhibited before to focus on one of his most engaging subjects – people. The exhibition will include portraits of people from around the world, with a special focus on Parr’s wry observations of Britishness, explored through a series of projects that investigate British identity today, including new works which reveal Parr’s take on the social climate in Britain in the aftermath of the EU referendum.

"Style: A Century of Fashion Photography, 1911-2011" at Getty


Blouin Artinfo

Chronicling the trends of fashion photography that have defined evolving ideas of style and beauty through the century, the J.Paul Getty Museum presents  Style: A Century of Fashion Photography, 1911-2011, June 26-October 21.

The exhibition includes more than 160 fashion images, including work by the likes of Herb Ritts, Lillian Bassman, Richard Avedon, Guy Bourdin, Erwin Blumenfeld, Louise Dahl-Wolfe, Hiro, and Scott Schuman. The show includes a variety of supplementary material, including illustrations, magazine covers, videos, and advertisements. Works by lesser-known but influential artists such as Corinne Day, Gleb Derujinsky, Toni Frissell, and Kourken Pakchanian are also included.

Robert Weingarten: Focus on Infinity


Los Angeles Public Library
6 June - 5 August 2018 

For the large-scale photographs in this exhibition, Los Angeles photographer Robert Weingarten established a single viewpoint, looking southeast over Santa Monica Bay, from which every photograph in the series would be made with the camera in exactly the same position. Each exposure would be made at precisely the same time of day—6:30 a.m.—measured by a quartz clock. All exposures were made with the lens focused on infinity and at the same aperture of f/22. Just two variables were allowed into this disciplined scheme: the shutter speed of the lens, which would be adjusted faster or slower depending on the quantity and quality of light available at 6:30 a.m. each day; and, the most variable element of all, changes in the scene that were introduced by the forces of nature. The resulting images are at once conceptual and an homage to a city at the edge of the North American continent, showcasing the unique light conditions that inform life here.

Chronicling the Lives of Women Along the Colombian-Venezuelan Border


The New York Times LENS Blog
 

Juanita Escobar likes to immerse herself in her projects. The self-taught photographer spent eight years living among the llaneros, the cowboys who work the plains of Colombia.  Now she has gone even farther, moving to what is perhaps her country’s most rural — and distant — 300 kilometer stretch of the Orinoco River, where she has been chronicling life along the border between Colombia and Venezuela...

International Photography Competition 2018


The Florida Museum of Photographic Arts (FMoPA)
Tampa, FL

Check out winners in each category (Conceptual, Abstract, Still Life, Documentary, Social, and Political Journalism, Nature, Science, and Animals, Places, Landscapes, and Drone, People and Portraits, & finally People’s Choice)...

11th Julia Margaret Cameron Award


The Photography Gala Awards

570 women photographers from 63 countries participated in the 11th edition of the Julia Margaret Cameron Award for Women Photographers Award submitting 5732 images. Given the quality of works, the juror, assisted by the team of curators of The Gala Awards have decided to award three photographers in this edition, that will share the First Prize. The prize of $3,000 will be divided among the three winners of the Award.

We're happy to announce that Monica Gorini from Italy, Diana Nicholette Jeon from United States, and Isabella Pacini from Germany, were selected as winners of the 11th edition of the Julia Margaret Cameron Award.

Their work will be exhibited in the 5th Biennial of Fine Art & Documentary Photography to be held in Barcelona this October.


British Journal of Photography

Europe boasts more than a hundred photography festivals, but few match the scale and ambition of Photo España in Madrid. This year, the organisation behind it, La Fábrica, celebrates the festival’s 20th edition with a typically eclectic summer season of activities throughout the Spanish capital, encompassing the work of more than 500 artists across dozens of venues that range from the small to the iconic.

“The festival is a collective project with a wide variety of institutions, both public and private, supporting it,” says director Claude Bussac, who is hoping that the 2018 edition will “push forward both the formal and geographical boundaries of photography… We aim to celebrate our 20th anniversary questioning photographic meaning and inviting photographers from every continent.”...

Dorothea Lange: Politics of Seeing at Barbican Centre


The Guardian

The Barbican in London is staging the first UK survey of the work of American documentary photographer Dorothea Lange (1895–1965), one of the most influential photographers of the 20th century. The exhibition charts Lange’s output and includes her celebrated Farm Security Administration work that captured the devastating impact of the Great Depression on the American population.

Dorothea Lange: Politics of Seeing
Barbican Art Gallery, London 
22 June – 2 September 2018


AnOther

American image-maker Saul Leiter was a famously private man, keeping a markedly low profile throughout his lifetime in spite of the widespread acclaim he garnered as a fashion photographer in the 60s and 70s. His modus operandi was one of constant, quiet observation, whether capturing glorious Kodachrome studies of the New York City streets or lensing models for the likes of Harper’s Bazaar and Elle. “There’s a great story that Grace Coddington tells in her biography,” Margit Erb, director of the Saul Leiter Foundation, tells AnOther. “She was to be photographed by the famous Saul Leiter and was told to meet him in one of the squares in Manhattan. She went there and stood and waited for about half an hour but he was a no-show. She went back to the office and said, ‘I tried to find him but I couldn’t,’ and the director said, ‘Oh no, he’s photographed you!’ Saul had a telephoto lens and he’d waited for her to arrive, photographed her from a distance as she stood there waiting – probably with her hips out in a very natural way – and he got the image.”...

Musée Nicéphore Niépce
Chalon-sur-Saône, FR
16 June - 16 September 2018 


(translated from French)

Offering an updated, broader vision of the pictorialist endeavour on a European scale, 'Artists’ Visions' results from recent research and discoveries and is the first exhibition dedicated to pictorial photography for over a decade in France. Sourced in the collections of the musée Nicéphore Niépce that preserves works by Robert Demachy and Charles Lhermitte, as well as prints by Constant Puyo, José Ortiz-Echagüe and Alfred Fauvarque-Omez, the exhibition brings together over two-hundred vintage prints. They are the work of various authors, some of them famous, others little known even unknown, until now. Most of these prints are being shown for the very first time. They were created over a seventy-year period, from the early 1890s to the late 1950s, showing that pictorial photography did not disappear after the First World War, contrary to what the history of photography traditionally lead us to believe. The narrative has changed and a new history must be taken into account acknowledging the permanence of the pictorialist ideals. These ideals were built on a shared ambition: to create photographs that wanted to do more than simply reproduce the real, photographs that truly interpreted it, like an artist’s vision.

British Journal of Photography

Yassine Alaoui Ismaili (Morocco), Paul Botes (South Africa), Anna Boyiazis (USA), Tommaso Fiscaletti & Nic Grobler (South Africa), and Phumzile Khanyile (South Africa) are the five winners of the seventh CAP Prize. Open to photographers of any age or background, the CAP Prize is awarded to work that engages with the African continent or its diaspora...
LensCulture

John Chiara’s one-of-a-kind mural-size camera obscura prints are luscious, moody and magical. He builds his own giant cameras (one which is large enough for him to climb inside) so he can expose light directly onto large sheets of photo-sensitive paper to capture images without needing film to act as an intermediate negative. His photos offer up ordinary urban landscapes that seem like three dimensional sculptures infused with light flares and liquid color. Somehow—through his mix of the direct process, hand-cut photo paper, filters and chemicals—everything looks real but “charged” with heightened energy.

Each of the unique prints is a collector’s dream, and a generous new book from Aperture and Pier 24 offers perfect reproductions with stunning production values...

Photography in Berlin

Galerie 36 is pleased to present the first comprehensive exhibition of the visionary advertising images by American photographer Bert Stern (1929 – 2013) from the early fifties to the late sixties. The exhibition “Shapes & Symbols” shows a selection of iconic photographs that emerged during the highly productive time of his rise to become one of the leading advertising photographers. Many of the works exhibited have never before been publicly displayed outside publications and magazines of their time and can now be seen for the first time in terms of their artistic value...

Robert Adams: Our Lives and Our Children


Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson
Paris, France
16 May - 29 July 2018

Robert Adams (born in 1937) is known for his photographic oeuvre on the changing landscape of the American West and his environmental conscience. This is the first exhibition in Paris to show the entire Our Lives and Our Children series, one of the photographer’s most striking visual essays on environmental destruction. One day, in the 1970s, the photographer noticed a column of smoke rising above the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant near Denver, Colorado and decided to document the potential destruction of a nuclear disaster.

Armed with a Hasselblad, hidden behind a shopping bag, he paced the town and its suburbs, parking lots and shopping malls, photographing people shaped by the consumer society and living their lives under this threat. He was particularly interested in the visible ties between people in the grip of a potential danger, known but invisible. Hidden beneath the apparent tranquillity of these women, men and children, there’s a taut line between the chance that seems to bring them together and the almost imperceptible danger of a nuclear disaster which Robert Adams believes is inevitable.

The Secret Photographer Who Captured Four Decades of Life in St. Petersburg


Hyperallergic

Late last year, 17 years after Masha Ivashintsova’s death, her relatives found a treasure trove of negatives and undeveloped film while cleaning out the family attic in St. Petersburg, Russia. But unlike most long-lost family photos, the 30,000 images show a unique aesthetic, one that Ivashintsova hid from her loved ones, inviting comparisons to Chicago street photographer Vivian Maier...

A Puzzle With No Solution: Roger Ballen’s Quest for Meaning Through Photography


The New York Times

Roger Ballen grew up immersed in the photography world. His mother, Adrienne, was an editor at Magnum, and the walls of his childhood home in Rye, N.Y., were filled with her colleagues’ images. “By the time I went out to photograph seriously, which was around the age of eighteen, I had a clear idea of the level I was aiming at,” Mr. Ballen, 68, writes in “Ballenesque, Roger Ballen: A Retrospective,” the first retrospective book of his career, which Thames & Hudson published in October.

While Mr. Ballen, an internationally renowned artist with nearly a dozen books to his name, has photographed virtually his entire life, he didn’t start thinking of himself as an artist until his late 40s. He stopped working as a geologist only in his 50s. He directed his first viral music video in his 60s...

GETTY MUSEUM APPOINTS JAMES A. GANZ TO SENIOR CURATOR OF PHOTOGRAPHS

The Getty Museum

 The Getty Museum has announced the appointment of James A. Ganz to Senior Curator of Photographs. Ganz will oversee the museum’s renowned collection of nearly 150,000 photographs, which represent the history of the medium from its inception to the present day. He joins the Getty after ten years at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, where he served as Curator of the Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts.

“Mr. Ganz’s experience is a perfect fit with the mission and scholarly focus of the Getty’s Department of Photographs. His many years of curating exhibitions and acquiring significant works will greatly enrich our collection and the work of our curatorial staff,” says Timothy Potts, director of the J. Paul Getty Museum. “He brings an energy, enthusiasm, and leadership that will help the department engage with an even broader audience and tell new and thoughtful stories about the history of photography up to the present day.”

“I have long admired the Getty’s commitment to photography, from the depth and breadth of its collections to its spacious galleries and ambitious exhibition and publication programs,” says Ganz. “I look forward to working with my new colleagues on developing and interpreting the museum’s photographic holdings for its diverse audiences, and exploring innovative ways to embrace the public’s special fascination with this dynamic art form.”


Ganz received his Ph.D. in art history from Yale University, his M.A. from Williams College, and his B.A. from Trinity College. His specializations include 19th-century European and American photography, as well as California-based photographers, including Carleton Watkins, Eadweard Muybridge, Willard Worden, Peter Stackpole, and Arnold Genthe. Prior to his time at the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco, Ganz was a curator for over ten years at the Sterling & Francine Clark Art Institute in Massachusetts, where he established the collection of photographs. While at the Clark, he taught the history of photography and of prints in the Williams College Graduate Program in the History of Art. 

Ganz will join the Getty in July 2018. 

Being: New Photography 2018


Museum of Modern Art (MOMA)
New York, NY
Until 19 August 2018


Every two years, MoMA’s celebrated New Photography exhibition series presents urgent and compelling ideas in recent photography and photo-based art. This year’s edition, Being, asks how photography can capture what it means to be human.

At a time when questions about the rights, responsibilities, and dangers inherent in being represented—and in representing others—are being debated around the world, the works featured in Being call attention to assumptions about how individuals are depicted and perceived. Many challenge the conventions of photographic portraiture, or use tactics such as masking, cropping, or fragmenting to disorient the viewer. In others, snapshots or found images are taken from their original context and placed in a new one to reveal hidden stories. While some of the works might be considered straightforward representations of individuals, others do not include images of the human body at all. Together, they explore how personhood is expressed today, and offer timely perspectives on issues of privacy and exposure; the formation of communities; and gender, heritage, and psychology.

Exploring new ground and the many forms that the photographic image can take, New Photography is a key part of the Museum’s contemporary program. Since 1985, the series has introduced new work by over 100 artists from around the world. In 2018, Being brings together an international group of 17 artists at various stages in their careers, all presenting their work at the Museum for the first time.

Lee Friedlander in Louisiana


New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA)
New Orleans, LA
27 April - 12 August 2018

One of the most famous living American photographers, Lee Friedlander has been visiting Louisiana since 1957 to document New Orleans jazz and to make artful street photographs. Lee Friedlander in Louisiana is the first major exhibition in any institution to examine the full scope and influence of Friedlander’s work in the region on the history of photography.


San Francisco Camerawork (SFC)
San Francisco, CA
3 May - 30 June 2018

SF Camerawork is proud to present Focal Points, an exhibition of the inaugural CatchLight Fellowship and Everyday Bay Area photography project, produced by CatchLight in partnership with United Photo Industries. CatchLight is a San Francisco Bay Area-based non-profit that annually recognizes three exceptional photographers who bring awareness to challenging social issues.

Featuring work from the 2017 CatchLight fellows, Tomas Van Houtryve, Sarah Blesener, and Brian L. Frank who were each paired with a media partner—the Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting, The Center for Investigative Reporting, and the Marshall Project, respectively, along with local artists from the Everyday Bay Area Collective, this traveling exhibition explores how visual storytelling has the power to drive social change. 

The Big Picture: A Transformative Gift from the Hall Family Foundation


Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
Kansas City, MO
28 April - 7 October 2018


In late 2015 the Hall Family Foundation, in continuing its long support of the photography program at The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, made a special $10 million grant to broaden and deepen this collection. The Big Picture: A Transformative Gift from the Hall Family Foundation features a selection of the more than 800 photographs acquired thanks to this generous gift.

This gift allowed the curators to build on the photography collection’s existing strengths—primarily its broad holding of American daguerreotypes and prints—and to enhance its representation of 19th-and 20th-century European and contemporary international works. These new pieces span the entire history of the medium, from an 1826 print by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, the inventor of photography, to a 2016 work by legendary musician and artist Patti Smith.

Mariana Yampolsky: Photographs from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)

Vincent Price Art Museum
Monterey Park, CA
20 March - 8 December 2018


In conjunction with On-Site: Neighborhood Partnerships with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, LACMA presents an exhibition at the Vincent Price Art Museum featuring a recent donation of works by Mexican photographer Mariana Yampolsky.

Mexican photographer Mariana Yampolsky (1925–2002) captured the beauty and desolation of Mexico and its history. American born, she moved to Mexico at the age of 19 and built an artistic practice honoring the cultural, natural, and architectural elements that fed her spiritually and inspired her to become a Mexican citizen. Combining a straightforward photo-documentary style with a poetic approach, Yampolsky has described her gaze as matching her imagery—precise and delicate, never overtly strident and always respectful.

On-Site: Neighborhood Partnerships with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art is a community engagement initiative that creates ways to make LACMA’s programs and collection accessible to the communities of Los Angeles County with the goal of broadening participation in cultural experiences. The exhibition and LACMA’s partnership with the Vincent Price Art Museum and East Los Angeles College are important components of the On-Site program.

Shape of Light: 100 Years of Photography and Abstract Art


Tate Modern
London, UK
Until 14 October 2018

Shape of Light is the first major exhibition to explore the relationship between the two, spanning the century from the 1910s to the present day. It brings to life the innovation and originality of photographers over this period, and shows how they responded and contributed to the development of abstraction. 
 
Key photographs are brought together from pioneers including Man Ray and Alfred Stieglitz, major contemporary artists such as Barbara Kasten and Thomas Ruff, right up to exciting new work by Antony Cairns, Maya Rochat and Daisuke Yokota, made especially for the exhibition.

State of the Art: Christopher Burkett's Race To Finish Decades of Work


ProPhotoDaily

The Oregon-based photographer is best known for producing large-format film prints of American landscapes. Over the past four decades, Burkett and his wife Ruth have lugged cumbersome photo gear across all 50 states to capture scenes ranging from blueberry fields in Maine to sunsets in his home state.

“It is awkward. It’s heavy. It’s a struggle with depth of field, a struggle with wind motion. But if you get an image you really have something really in-depth to work with,” Burkett told the PBS Newshour.

He added, “If you are really trying to work with photography you find out real rapidly that seeing things and photographing them can be quite different. And in fact, you have an image that is from that viewpoint of the camera is actually higher resolution than you normally experience the world from that viewpoint on that angle. So you have essentially a certain element of — I can’t really call a super realism because it’s real but it’s more real than what we normally see.”...

A Rare Collection of 19th-Century Photographs of Native Americans Goes Online


Hyperallergic

Between 1879 and 1902, a man named John N. Choate served as official photographer for the Carlisle Indian School, a federally-funded boarding school in Pennsylvania established to assimilate Native American children into Euro-American culture. Enrollment of indigenous youth was essentially a way to “civilize” them; the pithy motto of its founder, General Richard Henry Pratt, was “Kill the Indian, and save the man.” Choate, who was non-Native, often documented how students changed over as they received new haircuts and attire and shed aspects of their own culture.

Some of his records of this thorny past are among a collection of 19th-century photographs of North American Indians recently digitized and uploaded by the American Antiquarian Society as a scholarly finding aid...


IMDB

Set during the final days of the admired photo development system known as Kodachrome, a father and son hit the road in order to reach the Kansas photo lab before it closes its doors for good...

Willy Ronis, the heart and the eyes of Paris


The Eye of Photography

A key figure in the history of French photography, Willy Ronis is among the giants of so-called “humanist” photography devoted to capturing, with a brotherly eye, the essence of everyday life. In 1985, Willy Ronis began to scour his photography archive to select what he considered to be the essence of his work. He put together six albums, which thus constitute his “photographic testament.”

These albums are being shown to the public for the first time and make up the matrix of the exhibition which can be seen and heard from April 27 to September 29, 2018 at the Pavillon Carré de Baudouin, a venue located in the heart of the artistic Ménilmontant district and celebrating its tenth anniversary this year...


British Photo History

The world’s first photographic experiments, pictures by 20th-century greats Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Steichen, recent acquisitions by Linda McCartney gifted by Paul McCartney and his family, and newly commissioned works by Thomas Ruff, will go on display this autumn as part of the V&A’s new Photography Centre.

Opening on 12 October, the first phase of the Photography Centre, designed by David Kohn Architects, will more than double the space dedicated to photography at the V&A. The inaugural display will trace a history of photography from the 19th century to the present day through the theme of collectors and
collecting. Drawn from the V&A’s significantly expanded holdings, following the transfer of the Royal Photographic Society (RPS) collection, the display will show seminal prints and negatives by pioneers William Henry Fox Talbot, Julia Margaret Cameron and Frederick Scott Archer, alongside camera equipment, photographic publications and original documents to tell a broader story of international photography. It will also feature a digital wall to show the most cutting-edge photographic imagery.

To mark the opening, the V&A has commissioned internationally renowned German photographer Thomas Ruff to create a new body of work. Known for taking a critical and conceptual approach to photography, Ruff’s new series will be inspired by Linnaeus Tripe’s 1850s paper negatives of India and Burma from the V&A’s collection...

Tate Modern
London, UK
Until 3 December 2018


Ruwedel has spent many years photographing the North American landscape. The works in this display span 1995–2012 and include images of abandoned railways, nuclear testing sites and empty desert homes.

Each series explores how past events have been inscribed onto the earth’s surface, reflecting the artist’s belief that ‘at this point in history, pure nature is no longer a viable subject.’ He explains: ‘I have come to think of the land as being an enormous historical archive. I am interested in revealing the narratives contained within the landscape, especially those places where the land reveals itself as being both an agent of change and a field of human endeavour.’

Ruwedel merges documentary and conceptual methods of imagemaking. He repeatedly photographs the same subject or type of subject, an approach that relates to conceptual art practices of the 1960s and 1970s. He is also influenced by land artists who created large-scale outdoor artworks in the late 1960s using materials such as earth and rock.

Flint Institute of Arts
Flint, Michigan
21 April - 12 August 2018


This exhibition reexamines the important contemporary art movement that found its roots in the late 1960s in California and New York and continues today known as Photorealism. Aligned with Pop Art, Photorealism features ordinary elements of contemporary life such as vehicles, buildings, streets, and consumer products in an objective, often clinical, manner. Artists Richard Estes, Audrey Flack, and Ralph Goings use photography as a tool to help them reproduce the image as realistically as possible on canvas. 

The paintings in the exhibition demonstrate that Photorealism remains undiluted, conceptually coherent, and consistently compelling. The works can be appreciated for their technique, finesse, and appealing subject matter; but viewers can go deeper and enjoy the complexity and contradictions, the multiple means of an entrance that Photorealism affords. 
Smithsonian National Museum of African History and Culture
Washington D.C.

The Museum acquired Bill Adler’s Eyejammie Hip Hop Photography Collection in 2015, which provided the impetus to create the recent exhibition, Represent: Hip-Hop Photography. The Eyejammie Hip Hop Photography Collection consists of nearly 500 images from more than 40 photographers. This is the largest collection of hip-hop images held by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History & Culture.

Recognizing hip-hop as a culture that permeates many aspects of modern society, this is a timely show to include at the Museum. Created in the Bronx, New York, in the 1970s, hip-hop is nearly fifty years old. The local, youth based art form, has grown into an international phenomenon over the years. Using the four elements of hip-hop (MCing, breakdancing, graffiti, and DJing) as an organizational tool, I created four exhibition areas to highlight aspects of hip-hop: identity, community, activism, and creativity...

The New York Times

On an August morning in 1951, two American women met for the first time in the corridor of the Hotel Berchielli in Florence. Ninalee Allen, who was known as Jinx, was a vacationing nursery-school teacher. Ruth Orkin was a freelance photojournalist who, after chatting with Ms. Allen, asked if would she would pose for a photo essay about women traveling alone.

Jinx agreed, and they set off on what Jinx called a “photographic lark.” As they came to the Piazza della Repubblica, 15 men were loitering. Some were leaning on a wall. Two sat on a motor scooter. Nearly all were staring at the 6-foot-tall Ms. Allen. One leered and grabbed his crotch...

Washington D.C.
7- 10 June 2018

Join us June 7 – 10 in the nation’s capital as we celebrate the art of photography and the stories behind the images. For four days, Focus on the Story will convene some of the top names in photography. We want to bring together a community of photography lovers for a series of outstanding keynote presentations, panel discussions, workshops, exhibits, portfolio reviews, photo walks and community events.

Whether you are a professional, amateur, enthusiast or curious, here is your chance to spend four days celebrating, learning, seeing, living and breathing photography. What could be better, right?

News from the World of Photography: April 2018

*|MC:SUBJECT|*

2018 Professional Competition: Photographer of the Year - Alys Tomlinson, British


World Photography Organization

Ex Voto is a personal project by London-based photographer Tomlinson (age 43). The winning work encompasses formal portraiture, large format landscape and small, detailed still-life images of the ‘ex-votos’ (offerings of religious devotion) found at pilgrimage sites of Lourdes (France), Ballyvourney (Ireland) and Grabarka (Poland).

The photographer mainly explores themes of environment, belonging and identity.  She recently completed an MA (Distinction) in Anthropology of Travel, Tourism and Pilgrimage and has been recognised by a number of photography prizes.

Diane Arbus' daring early work: 'It was a story that went untold, until now'

The Guardian
 
In 1970, Diane Arbus was a struggling magazine photographer in New York City. She wanted to make more money, so she put together a series of photos in a plexiglass box, which she called “A box of ten photographs by Diane Arbus”, priced at $1,000.

The photos highlight the outcasts of American society, such as giants, dwarves
and transvestites. Arbus’s photos shocked and disgusted art crowds to the point they were spat on when exhibited. As Norman Mailer observed: “Giving a camera to Diane Arbus is like putting a live grenade in the hands of a child.”...

Brassai: The ‘Eye of Paris’


The New York Times LENS Blog

It’s hard to be stuck in a studio while longing to enjoy life outside. Brassaï, famed for his classic images of Paris, was neither a photographer nor a Parisian — he wanted to be a painter. But once he arrived in Paris in 1924, he gave up his brushes. The fact was, he was so attracted to Parisian life that he said he had no interest in confining himself “to the four walls of an atelier all alone.”  

That sentiment and others cited in “Brassai,” a book recently released by Spain’s Fundación Mapfre, were most likely colored by Brassaï’s retrospective regret for not returning to painting. His legacy would come from his peregrinations outside the studio...  

So beautiful: the beauty of women in iconic images
 

The Eye of Photography

In focus galerie, in Cologne, Germany, offers at the moment an exhibition which is a tribute to the beauty of women. So beautiful takes the viewer on a journey from 1940 up to today to discover photographs – in humanist, fashion, or conceptual contexts – that focus on the beauty of women. It takes the liberty to focus on elegance and aesthetics in the #MeToo discussion and is also a reaction to the tendency in contemporary photography, to show every day and uninspired things and events.

Among the photographers are  Lillian Bassman, Edouard Boubat, Lucien Clergue, Elliott Erwitt, René Groebli, FC Gundlach, William Klein, Helmut Newton, Jeanloup Sieff and more. “It’s difficult with beauty, we’re not in agreement on what it should mean,” said artist Gerhard Richter in 2005. “Certainly it is also because the term beauty is so hackneyed or sounds like “the good” and ‘the true’. But that does not change the value of such ideal qualities and the fact that people need beauty. For me, beauty has always been a criterion for the quality of artwork, of whatever kind and from what ever time. Beauty is very simple, first of all it is the opposite of destruction and dissolution and damage, and with that it is inseparably connected with form, without which nothing can happen.”

The Woman Behind the First Photography Gallery


Aperture

Helen Gee risked everything to open Limelight in 1954, selling prints by Ansel Adams, Berenice Abbott, and Robert Frank for less than fifty dollars each. Her tell-all memoir, Helen Gee: Limelight, a Greenwich Village Photography Gallery and Coffeehouse in the Fifties, is now available from Aperture as an e-book. Here, Denise Bethel’s introduction offers a preview of the late Gee’s story...

Stanley Kubrick’s little-known life as a still photographer


The Washington Post

Most of us know Stanley Kubrick as the legendary director of some of cinema’s most significant, landmark films. When we see his name, we think of “2001: A Space Odyssey,” “A Clockwork Orange,” “Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb” or “The Shining.” What most of us probably don’t know is that he started his creative endeavors as a still photographer. Even more surprising, he started down that path as a precocious 17-year-old who eventually landed a job as a staff photographer for Look magazine, the storied pictorial competitor to Henry Luce’s Life. A new exhibit opening May 3 at the Museum of the City of New York titled “Through a Different Lens: Stanley Kubrick Photographs,” brings together more than 120 photos taken by Kubrick during that time. Cumulatively, this exhibit provides us with a glimpse of the creative force the young Kubrick was and the one that he would eventually become...


Hyperallergic

PARIS — Dada virtuoso Raoul Hausmann’s photographic oeuvre from 1927 to 1936 exposes his oddball art antics at play with naiveté. Arriving as Vision in Action at the Jeu de Paume from Le Point du Jour in Cherbourg are over 130 of his relatively undiscovered, vintage black-and-white photographs, curated by Dada doyen Cécile Bargues. Startlingly enough, some of the photographs by this dada-driven demon are rather banal, cliché, and even conventional, while others are typical of odd, avant-garde compositional ideas and outré experiences. Taken together, they indicate where this Vienna-born pioneer of cultural agitation, collage, photomontage, and sound poetry took refuge shortly after the Nazis’ rise to power...

Segregated Influences: Wendel White and Tya Alisa Anthony


Colorado Photographic Arts Center (CPAC)
Denver, CO
20 April - 2 June 2018


The Colorado Photographic Arts Center is pleased to present Segregated Influences, an exhibition that explores the complex history of race in America through the photographs of Wendel White, Distinguished Professor of Art at Stockton University, and Tya Alisa Anthony, a Denver-based visual artist.

In Schools for the Colored, White photographs the architectural remains of structures once used as segregated schools for African Americans in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois. The exhibition presents 20 black-and-white images of school buildings that appear isolated from their surrounding landscapes, which are obscured from view using digital techniques. This technique is a representation of W.E.B. DuBois’ famous concept of “the veil,” a metaphor for the divide that separates the lives of black and white Americans.

Anthony’s ongoing series, Complexion, confronts the results of colorism perpetuated within the history of the media. Colorism, distinct from racism, involves discrimination against persons based on skin tone, regardless of their perceived racial identity.

Drawing from the archives of the historically African-American lifestyle digest, Jet Magazine, Anthony investigates the contrast between images published in the 1950s and today. “Unlike today’s Jet Magazine filled with wealthy black celebrities of various skin tones, in the 1950s they printed much fairer skinned women of color with European-inspired hairstyles and created a complex relationship between what was ‘acceptable’ and reality,” writes Anthony.

Although each artist takes a vastly different approach, both artists use the power of photography to illuminate America’s complex history of race in ways that can help increase our understanding of social conditions today.

Abbas: 1944 – 2018


Magnum Photos

Magnum photographer Abbas has died in Paris on Wednesday April 25, 2018, at the age of 74. In a career that spanned six decades, he covered wars and revolutions in Biafra, Bangladesh, Northern Ireland, Vietnam, the Middle East, Chile, Cuba, and South Africa during apartheid. He also documented life in Mexico over several years, and pursued a lifelong interest in religion and its intersection with society.

Magnum’s current president Thomas Dworzak paid tribute to the veteran photographer, who for many at the agency has been both a friend and mentor:

“He was a pillar of Magnum, a godfather for a generation of younger photojournalists. An Iranian transplanted to Paris, he was a citizen of the world he relentlessly documented; its wars, its disasters, its revolutions and upheavals, and its beliefs – all his life. It is with immense sadness that we lose him. May the gods and angels of all the world’s major religions he photographed so passionately be there for him.”...

Stephen Shore


Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
New York, NY
Through 29 May 2018

Stephen Shore encompasses the entirety of the artist’s work of the last five decades, during which he has conducted a continual, restless interrogation of image making, from the gelatin silver prints he made as a teenager to his current engagement with digital platforms.

One of the most significant photographers of our time, Stephen Shore (American, b. 1947) has often been considered alongside other artists who rose to prominence in the 1970s by capturing the mundane aspects of American popular culture in straightforward, unglamorous images. But Shore has worked with many forms of photography, switching from cheap automatic cameras to large-format cameras in the 1970s, pioneering the use of color before returning to black and white in the 1990s, and in the 2000s taking up the opportunities of digital photography, digital printing, and social media.

The artist’s first survey in New York to include his entire career, this exhibition will both allow for a fuller understanding of Shore’s work, and demonstrate his singular vision—defined by an interest in daily life, a taste for serial and often systematic approaches, a strong intellectual underpinning, a restrained style, sly humor, and visual casualness—and uncompromising pursuit of photography’s possibilities.

Auction Results: The Knowing Eye, Photographs & Photobooks


Swann Auction Galleries

Emoi Photographique: the body from every angle


The Eye of Photography

L’Emoi Photographique (The Photographic Emotion) is a photography festival that takes place in Angouleme in France from March 24 to April 29, 2018. The festival this year has three guests: ORLAN, Joana Choumali and Gerard Chauvin. It offers a program of twenty-eight exhibitions around the theme “The body from every angle”. Twenty-eight exhibitions whose diversity is the essence of the festival. The Eye of Photography invites you to discover a selection of  photographs from the exhibition.


The San Francisco Chronicle

As a 21-year-old art student at San Francisco State in 1962, Judy Dater took her very first photography class and, as she remembers it, fell in love with portraiture “at a time when everybody else was photographing landscapes.”

Dater was just getting comfortable behind the camera (“first a 35mm, before I fell in love with the magic of a 4-by-5,” she says) during a period when the West Coast f.64 group (including Ansel Adams, Brett Weston and Imogen Cunningham), founded in Oakland in the 1930s, remained influential in the Bay Area’s photography scene. Named for an aperture used to achieve maximum sharpness and depth of field with a large-format camera, the collective espoused an environmental, anti-pictorialist aesthetic — think of Adams’ mountains or Weston’s rippling sand dunes — that still held sway three decades later...

From Ghana to Paris: the stunning photography of Todd Webb - in pictures


The Guardian

Michigan-born photographer Todd Webb used his camera to showcase everyday life in Paris, New York, the American south-west and parts of Africa. His work was typified by seemingly simple pictures that were surprisingly complex when examined up close. In a booth at this year’s AIPAD at Pier 94 in New York, some of his finest images will be on display...


Magnum Photos

This retrospective exhibition commemorates the 80th birthday of the distinguished Czech photographer and provides a cross-section of his entire oeuvre. About 400 works that Josef Koudelka donated to this museum will form the backbone of the exhibition.

Complementing the selection will be picture loans from the Magnum Photo agency, hand-picked by the photographer and curator Irena Šorfová. Photos of the Soviet Invasion of Czechoslovakia (August 1968) will be prominently featured, along with original pictures and documentary materials from Josef Koudelka’s archive.

Two books will be published in Czech and English: one a catalog of Koudelka’s donated works; the other presenting a few selected series from the exhibition, essays and a biography of the artist.

New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA)
New Orleans, LA
2 March - 17 June 2018


Lee Friedlander took promotional portraits for a number of recording companies beginning in the mid-1950s and through the 1970s. Most well-known for his work with Atlantic Records, many of his session photographs became classic jazz, country, and rhythm and blues record album covers. Presented in the Great Hall, American Musicians includes some of Friedlander’s most dynamic color pictures, as well as intimate, but equally vivid, portraits taken while scouting talent with record label executives.

Lee Friedlander was born in 1934 and graduated from the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California, in 1956. That year he moved to New York City where he began photographing jazz musicians for Atlantic Records. Although he has always been based in New York, Lee Friedlander has spent time photographing Louisiana, and New Orleans in particular, continually since his first visit in 1957. Through his portraits of famous jazz musicians made into album covers for
Atlantic he helped promote jazz internationally, while his portraits of lesser-known artists in their homes have preserved a local history of the genre. A larger exhibition of the photographer’s works, Lee Friedlander in Louisiana, will open at NOMA on April 27.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
New York, NY
14 February - 28 May 2018


The American photographer William Eggleston (born 1939) emerged in the early 1960s as a pioneer of modern color photography. Now, fifty years later, he is arguably its greatest exemplar. This exhibition features a landmark gift to The Met by Jade Lau of the artist's most notable portfolio, Los Alamos. Comprising seventy-five dye transfer prints from color negatives made between 1965 and 1974, the series has never been shown in its entirety in New York City and includes the artist's first color photograph (Untitled, Memphis, 1965) of a young clerk pushing a train of shopping carts at a supermarket in Memphis, Tennessee.
Royal Museums Greenwich- National Maritime Museum
London, UK
23 March - 30 September 2018


Examine the ambiguities and absurdities of seaside life through this major exhibition of over 100 photographs. All four photographers share a love of the seaside which reveals itself in playful and often profound representations of the British by the sea while still bringing their own distinctive take on the seaside experience. Ray-Jones gives us a social anthropologist’s view, Hurn’s is a nostalgic love letter to the beach, Parr provides an often-satirical examination of class and cliché while Roberts explores our collective relationship with, and impact on, the coast.

The Great British Seaside includes images from the archival collections of each of the photographers, new films, and new work by Martin Parr.

The New York Times LENS Blog

Anne Wilkes Tucker was granted special access to the Library of Congress’ photographic archives of over 14 million pictures and has curated an exhibit featuring more than 440 images at the Annenberg Space for Photography in Los Angeles. Ms. Tucker, the curator emerita of Houston’s Museum of Fine Arts, chose a wide array of mostly rare and never before exhibited images that highlight the collection’s breadth and depth for the show “Not an Ostrich: And Other Images From America’s Library,” which opens April 21. Ms. Tucker spoke with James Estrin, and their conversation has been edited for clarity and brevity...

ARTNews

Chicana photographer Laura Aguilar, whose stunning retrospective at the Vincent Price Art Museum in Monterrey Park, California, now on view at the Frost Art Museum at Florida International University in Miami, made her one of the breakout stars of the Getty Foundation’s recent Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA initiative, has died. She was 58...

The Washington Post

Though a more elusive artist than some of her students, photography teacher Lisette Model’s own work had a voice. “Their audacity, their humanity and humor are what make her images live on into our time. I believe these qualities were also some of the strengths she brought to her teaching — ‘shoot from the gut’ and so on,” Ann Thomas, senior curator of photography at the Canadian Photography Institute, who also wrote an extensive biography about Model, told In Sight.

Thomas curated a show of 71 photographs from the collection of 293 prints from the Canadian Photography Institute of the National Gallery of Canada, comprising Model’s early street photographs in Paris, emboldened portraits along the Promenade des Anglais, as well as her better-known images of Coney Island, Sammy’s Bar in New York and the Running Legs series. The exhibition, “Lisette Model: Photographs from the Canadian Photography Institute of the National Gallery of Canada,” is on view at the Boca Raton Museum of Art from April 24 through Oct. 21...

The Guardian

The Association of Photographers, which represents the UK’s professional photographers, is celebrating its 50th anniversary with "AOP50", a retrospective of images curated by Zelda Cheatle. The following is a selection...