News from the World of Photography: April 2018

*|MC:SUBJECT|*

2018 Professional Competition: Photographer of the Year - Alys Tomlinson, British


World Photography Organization

Ex Voto is a personal project by London-based photographer Tomlinson (age 43). The winning work encompasses formal portraiture, large format landscape and small, detailed still-life images of the ‘ex-votos’ (offerings of religious devotion) found at pilgrimage sites of Lourdes (France), Ballyvourney (Ireland) and Grabarka (Poland).

The photographer mainly explores themes of environment, belonging and identity.  She recently completed an MA (Distinction) in Anthropology of Travel, Tourism and Pilgrimage and has been recognised by a number of photography prizes.

Diane Arbus' daring early work: 'It was a story that went untold, until now'

The Guardian
 
In 1970, Diane Arbus was a struggling magazine photographer in New York City. She wanted to make more money, so she put together a series of photos in a plexiglass box, which she called “A box of ten photographs by Diane Arbus”, priced at $1,000.

The photos highlight the outcasts of American society, such as giants, dwarves
and transvestites. Arbus’s photos shocked and disgusted art crowds to the point they were spat on when exhibited. As Norman Mailer observed: “Giving a camera to Diane Arbus is like putting a live grenade in the hands of a child.”...

Brassai: The ‘Eye of Paris’


The New York Times LENS Blog

It’s hard to be stuck in a studio while longing to enjoy life outside. Brassaï, famed for his classic images of Paris, was neither a photographer nor a Parisian — he wanted to be a painter. But once he arrived in Paris in 1924, he gave up his brushes. The fact was, he was so attracted to Parisian life that he said he had no interest in confining himself “to the four walls of an atelier all alone.”  

That sentiment and others cited in “Brassai,” a book recently released by Spain’s Fundación Mapfre, were most likely colored by Brassaï’s retrospective regret for not returning to painting. His legacy would come from his peregrinations outside the studio...  

So beautiful: the beauty of women in iconic images
 

The Eye of Photography

In focus galerie, in Cologne, Germany, offers at the moment an exhibition which is a tribute to the beauty of women. So beautiful takes the viewer on a journey from 1940 up to today to discover photographs – in humanist, fashion, or conceptual contexts – that focus on the beauty of women. It takes the liberty to focus on elegance and aesthetics in the #MeToo discussion and is also a reaction to the tendency in contemporary photography, to show every day and uninspired things and events.

Among the photographers are  Lillian Bassman, Edouard Boubat, Lucien Clergue, Elliott Erwitt, René Groebli, FC Gundlach, William Klein, Helmut Newton, Jeanloup Sieff and more. “It’s difficult with beauty, we’re not in agreement on what it should mean,” said artist Gerhard Richter in 2005. “Certainly it is also because the term beauty is so hackneyed or sounds like “the good” and ‘the true’. But that does not change the value of such ideal qualities and the fact that people need beauty. For me, beauty has always been a criterion for the quality of artwork, of whatever kind and from what ever time. Beauty is very simple, first of all it is the opposite of destruction and dissolution and damage, and with that it is inseparably connected with form, without which nothing can happen.”

The Woman Behind the First Photography Gallery


Aperture

Helen Gee risked everything to open Limelight in 1954, selling prints by Ansel Adams, Berenice Abbott, and Robert Frank for less than fifty dollars each. Her tell-all memoir, Helen Gee: Limelight, a Greenwich Village Photography Gallery and Coffeehouse in the Fifties, is now available from Aperture as an e-book. Here, Denise Bethel’s introduction offers a preview of the late Gee’s story...

Stanley Kubrick’s little-known life as a still photographer


The Washington Post

Most of us know Stanley Kubrick as the legendary director of some of cinema’s most significant, landmark films. When we see his name, we think of “2001: A Space Odyssey,” “A Clockwork Orange,” “Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb” or “The Shining.” What most of us probably don’t know is that he started his creative endeavors as a still photographer. Even more surprising, he started down that path as a precocious 17-year-old who eventually landed a job as a staff photographer for Look magazine, the storied pictorial competitor to Henry Luce’s Life. A new exhibit opening May 3 at the Museum of the City of New York titled “Through a Different Lens: Stanley Kubrick Photographs,” brings together more than 120 photos taken by Kubrick during that time. Cumulatively, this exhibit provides us with a glimpse of the creative force the young Kubrick was and the one that he would eventually become...


Hyperallergic

PARIS — Dada virtuoso Raoul Hausmann’s photographic oeuvre from 1927 to 1936 exposes his oddball art antics at play with naiveté. Arriving as Vision in Action at the Jeu de Paume from Le Point du Jour in Cherbourg are over 130 of his relatively undiscovered, vintage black-and-white photographs, curated by Dada doyen Cécile Bargues. Startlingly enough, some of the photographs by this dada-driven demon are rather banal, cliché, and even conventional, while others are typical of odd, avant-garde compositional ideas and outré experiences. Taken together, they indicate where this Vienna-born pioneer of cultural agitation, collage, photomontage, and sound poetry took refuge shortly after the Nazis’ rise to power...

PHOTOCULTURE Conversations Episode #8: Mary Beth Heffernan

PHOTOCULTURE Conversations Episode #8: Mary Beth Heffernan

Recipient of the first PAC·LA Contemporary Artist Grant, Heffernan worked in residency at the Huntington Library, where she applied her research-based practice to a rare book in the Huntington's collection.   "I hope my consideration of The Huntington's copy of Anatomy will yield insights about this book that is a representation of bodies, and also a body itself.”

News from the World of Photography: March 2018

*|MC:SUBJECT|*

Segregated Influences: Wendel White and Tya Alisa Anthony


Colorado Photographic Arts Center (CPAC)
Denver, CO
20 April - 2 June 2018


The Colorado Photographic Arts Center is pleased to present Segregated Influences, an exhibition that explores the complex history of race in America through the photographs of Wendel White, Distinguished Professor of Art at Stockton University, and Tya Alisa Anthony, a Denver-based visual artist.

In Schools for the Colored, White photographs the architectural remains of structures once used as segregated schools for African Americans in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois. The exhibition presents 20 black-and-white images of school buildings that appear isolated from their surrounding landscapes, which are obscured from view using digital techniques. This technique is a representation of W.E.B. DuBois’ famous concept of “the veil,” a metaphor for the divide that separates the lives of black and white Americans.

Anthony’s ongoing series, Complexion, confronts the results of colorism perpetuated within the history of the media. Colorism, distinct from racism, involves discrimination against persons based on skin tone, regardless of their perceived racial identity.

Drawing from the archives of the historically African-American lifestyle digest, Jet Magazine, Anthony investigates the contrast between images published in the 1950s and today. “Unlike today’s Jet Magazine filled with wealthy black celebrities of various skin tones, in the 1950s they printed much fairer skinned women of color with European-inspired hairstyles and created a complex relationship between what was ‘acceptable’ and reality,” writes Anthony.

Although each artist takes a vastly different approach, both artists use the power of photography to illuminate America’s complex history of race in ways that can help increase our understanding of social conditions today.

Abbas: 1944 – 2018


Magnum Photos

Magnum photographer Abbas has died in Paris on Wednesday April 25, 2018, at the age of 74. In a career that spanned six decades, he covered wars and revolutions in Biafra, Bangladesh, Northern Ireland, Vietnam, the Middle East, Chile, Cuba, and South Africa during apartheid. He also documented life in Mexico over several years, and pursued a lifelong interest in religion and its intersection with society.

Magnum’s current president Thomas Dworzak paid tribute to the veteran photographer, who for many at the agency has been both a friend and mentor:

“He was a pillar of Magnum, a godfather for a generation of younger photojournalists. An Iranian transplanted to Paris, he was a citizen of the world he relentlessly documented; its wars, its disasters, its revolutions and upheavals, and its beliefs – all his life. It is with immense sadness that we lose him. May the gods and angels of all the world’s major religions he photographed so passionately be there for him.”...

Stephen Shore


Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
New York, NY
Through 29 May 2018

Stephen Shore encompasses the entirety of the artist’s work of the last five decades, during which he has conducted a continual, restless interrogation of image making, from the gelatin silver prints he made as a teenager to his current engagement with digital platforms.

One of the most significant photographers of our time, Stephen Shore (American, b. 1947) has often been considered alongside other artists who rose to prominence in the 1970s by capturing the mundane aspects of American popular culture in straightforward, unglamorous images. But Shore has worked with many forms of photography, switching from cheap automatic cameras to large-format cameras in the 1970s, pioneering the use of color before returning to black and white in the 1990s, and in the 2000s taking up the opportunities of digital photography, digital printing, and social media.

The artist’s first survey in New York to include his entire career, this exhibition will both allow for a fuller understanding of Shore’s work, and demonstrate his singular vision—defined by an interest in daily life, a taste for serial and often systematic approaches, a strong intellectual underpinning, a restrained style, sly humor, and visual casualness—and uncompromising pursuit of photography’s possibilities.

Auction Results: The Knowing Eye, Photographs & Photobooks


Swann Auction Galleries

Emoi Photographique: the body from every angle


The Eye of Photography

L’Emoi Photographique (The Photographic Emotion) is a photography festival that takes place in Angouleme in France from March 24 to April 29, 2018. The festival this year has three guests: ORLAN, Joana Choumali and Gerard Chauvin. It offers a program of twenty-eight exhibitions around the theme “The body from every angle”. Twenty-eight exhibitions whose diversity is the essence of the festival. The Eye of Photography invites you to discover a selection of  photographs from the exhibition.


The San Francisco Chronicle

As a 21-year-old art student at San Francisco State in 1962, Judy Dater took her very first photography class and, as she remembers it, fell in love with portraiture “at a time when everybody else was photographing landscapes.”

Dater was just getting comfortable behind the camera (“first a 35mm, before I fell in love with the magic of a 4-by-5,” she says) during a period when the West Coast f.64 group (including Ansel Adams, Brett Weston and Imogen Cunningham), founded in Oakland in the 1930s, remained influential in the Bay Area’s photography scene. Named for an aperture used to achieve maximum sharpness and depth of field with a large-format camera, the collective espoused an environmental, anti-pictorialist aesthetic — think of Adams’ mountains or Weston’s rippling sand dunes — that still held sway three decades later...

From Ghana to Paris: the stunning photography of Todd Webb - in pictures


The Guardian

Michigan-born photographer Todd Webb used his camera to showcase everyday life in Paris, New York, the American south-west and parts of Africa. His work was typified by seemingly simple pictures that were surprisingly complex when examined up close. In a booth at this year’s AIPAD at Pier 94 in New York, some of his finest images will be on display...


Magnum Photos

This retrospective exhibition commemorates the 80th birthday of the distinguished Czech photographer and provides a cross-section of his entire oeuvre. About 400 works that Josef Koudelka donated to this museum will form the backbone of the exhibition.

Complementing the selection will be picture loans from the Magnum Photo agency, hand-picked by the photographer and curator Irena Šorfová. Photos of the Soviet Invasion of Czechoslovakia (August 1968) will be prominently featured, along with original pictures and documentary materials from Josef Koudelka’s archive.

Two books will be published in Czech and English: one a catalog of Koudelka’s donated works; the other presenting a few selected series from the exhibition, essays and a biography of the artist.

New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA)
New Orleans, LA
2 March - 17 June 2018


Lee Friedlander took promotional portraits for a number of recording companies beginning in the mid-1950s and through the 1970s. Most well-known for his work with Atlantic Records, many of his session photographs became classic jazz, country, and rhythm and blues record album covers. Presented in the Great Hall, American Musicians includes some of Friedlander’s most dynamic color pictures, as well as intimate, but equally vivid, portraits taken while scouting talent with record label executives.

Lee Friedlander was born in 1934 and graduated from the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California, in 1956. That year he moved to New York City where he began photographing jazz musicians for Atlantic Records. Although he has always been based in New York, Lee Friedlander has spent time photographing Louisiana, and New Orleans in particular, continually since his first visit in 1957. Through his portraits of famous jazz musicians made into album covers for
Atlantic he helped promote jazz internationally, while his portraits of lesser-known artists in their homes have preserved a local history of the genre. A larger exhibition of the photographer’s works, Lee Friedlander in Louisiana, will open at NOMA on April 27.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
New York, NY
14 February - 28 May 2018


The American photographer William Eggleston (born 1939) emerged in the early 1960s as a pioneer of modern color photography. Now, fifty years later, he is arguably its greatest exemplar. This exhibition features a landmark gift to The Met by Jade Lau of the artist's most notable portfolio, Los Alamos. Comprising seventy-five dye transfer prints from color negatives made between 1965 and 1974, the series has never been shown in its entirety in New York City and includes the artist's first color photograph (Untitled, Memphis, 1965) of a young clerk pushing a train of shopping carts at a supermarket in Memphis, Tennessee.
Royal Museums Greenwich- National Maritime Museum
London, UK
23 March - 30 September 2018


Examine the ambiguities and absurdities of seaside life through this major exhibition of over 100 photographs. All four photographers share a love of the seaside which reveals itself in playful and often profound representations of the British by the sea while still bringing their own distinctive take on the seaside experience. Ray-Jones gives us a social anthropologist’s view, Hurn’s is a nostalgic love letter to the beach, Parr provides an often-satirical examination of class and cliché while Roberts explores our collective relationship with, and impact on, the coast.

The Great British Seaside includes images from the archival collections of each of the photographers, new films, and new work by Martin Parr.

The New York Times LENS Blog

Anne Wilkes Tucker was granted special access to the Library of Congress’ photographic archives of over 14 million pictures and has curated an exhibit featuring more than 440 images at the Annenberg Space for Photography in Los Angeles. Ms. Tucker, the curator emerita of Houston’s Museum of Fine Arts, chose a wide array of mostly rare and never before exhibited images that highlight the collection’s breadth and depth for the show “Not an Ostrich: And Other Images From America’s Library,” which opens April 21. Ms. Tucker spoke with James Estrin, and their conversation has been edited for clarity and brevity...

ARTNews

Chicana photographer Laura Aguilar, whose stunning retrospective at the Vincent Price Art Museum in Monterrey Park, California, now on view at the Frost Art Museum at Florida International University in Miami, made her one of the breakout stars of the Getty Foundation’s recent Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA initiative, has died. She was 58...

The Washington Post

Though a more elusive artist than some of her students, photography teacher Lisette Model’s own work had a voice. “Their audacity, their humanity and humor are what make her images live on into our time. I believe these qualities were also some of the strengths she brought to her teaching — ‘shoot from the gut’ and so on,” Ann Thomas, senior curator of photography at the Canadian Photography Institute, who also wrote an extensive biography about Model, told In Sight.

Thomas curated a show of 71 photographs from the collection of 293 prints from the Canadian Photography Institute of the National Gallery of Canada, comprising Model’s early street photographs in Paris, emboldened portraits along the Promenade des Anglais, as well as her better-known images of Coney Island, Sammy’s Bar in New York and the Running Legs series. The exhibition, “Lisette Model: Photographs from the Canadian Photography Institute of the National Gallery of Canada,” is on view at the Boca Raton Museum of Art from April 24 through Oct. 21...

The Guardian

The Association of Photographers, which represents the UK’s professional photographers, is celebrating its 50th anniversary with "AOP50", a retrospective of images curated by Zelda Cheatle. The following is a selection...

A Maverick of Japanese Photography, Bound Tight to Ritual


The New York Times

“The Incomplete Araki” is a knowingly redundant title for an exhibition of Japan’s most prolific, most controversial, and most disobedient photographer. For more than 50 years, Nobuyoshi Araki has pushed the limits of production — he has taken an uncountable number of photographs, gathered into something like 500 books — and pushed the limits, too, of free expression. He was arrested once on obscenity charges, and Japanese and foreign authorities have censored his exhibitions of Tokyo streetscapes, blossoming flowers, and, most notoriously, women trussed up in the baroque rope bondage technique known as kinbaku-bi, or “the beauty of tight binding.”...

These Powerful Photos Capture Life For Black Americans During the 20th Century


Buzzfeed

Gordon Parks is a photographer whose name is synonymous with artistic genius and unwavering perseverance amid an era of bigotry and hate. Parks rose to prominence as one of the nation's preeminent photojournalists, hired to be the first black staff photographer for Life magazine. While his pictures expertly depict a wide range of topics, some of his most iconic photographs show aspects of African-American life that many of his white colleagues simply did not have access to. Because of this, Parks became the voice of a generation, able to capture and contextualize the African-American experience at a time when many sought to silence black voices in the US.

A two-part exhibition of his work titled Gordon Parks: I Am You, on view now at Jack Shainman Gallery in New York City, brings together some of his most iconic pictures...

The Train: RFK’s Last Journey


SFMOMA
San Francisco, CA 
17 March - 10 June 2018


On June 8, 1968, three days after the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy, his body was carried by a funeral train from New York City to Washington, D.C., for burial at Arlington Cemetery. The Train looks at this historical event through three distinct works. The first is a group of color photographs by commissioned photographer Paul Fusco. Taken from the funeral train, the images capture mourners who lined the railway tracks to pay their final respects. Looking from the opposite perspective, the second work features photographs and home movies by the spectators themselves, collected by Dutch artist Rein Jelle Terpstra in his project The People’s View (2014–18). The third, a work by French artist Philippe Parreno, is a 70mm film reenactment of the funeral train’s journey, inspired by Fusco’s original photographs. Bringing historical and contemporary works together in dialogue, this powerful, multidisciplinary exhibition sheds new light on this pivotal moment in American history.

Susan Meiselas: Mediations

Jeu de Paume
Concorde, Paris
6 February - 20 May 2018


The retrospective devoted to the American photographer Susan Meiselas (b. 1948, Baltimore) brings together a selection of works from the 1970s to the present day.

A member of Magnum Photos since 1976, Susan Meiselas questions documentary practice. She became known through her work in conflict zones of Central America in the 1970s and 1980s in particular due to the strength of her 
colour photographs. Covering many subjects and countries, from war to human rights issues and from cultural identity to the sex industry, Meiselas uses photography, film, video and sometimes archive material, as she relentlessly explores and develops narratives integrating the participation of her subjects in her works. The exhibition highlights Susan Meiselas’ unique personal as well as geopolitical approach, showing how she moves through time and conflict and how she constantly questions the photographic process and her role as witness.

In “One, Two, Three, More” Helen Levitt Reminds us that Street Photography Used to be Awkward 


Resource

Helen Levitt (1913-2009) spent sixty years in the streets of New York, photographing what she saw. Associated early in her career with contemporary Walker Evans, Levitt has been called “the most celebrated and least known photographer of her time.” The New York Times, meanwhile, describes her work as catching “fleeting moments of surpassing lyricism, mystery and quiet drama on the streets of her native New York.”...

Why Nan Goldin, Diane Arbus, and Brassaï’s Photos are Still So Important


Dazed

“History repeats itself so often that looking at it from a long view is forever important.” Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles (MOCA) curator, Lanka Tattersall, is reflecting on why it’s important to look at photography from the past. It’s a sentiment that drives MOCA’s upcoming show, Real Worlds: Brassaï, Arbus, Goldin, that uses the three seminal photographers as a means for understanding our world’s current social and political context. Not just because in these photographers’ contexts, the camera is used as a way to illuminate and restore truths for marginalised communities, but because the realities presented in their images are as cyclical as the earth’s rotation, and sadly still present today. “If you really think about it”, says Tattersall “photography is a document of someone standing before the camera and making their presence as an impression of light on a plate or a colour negative. From this transmission, their impression is present forever.”  

Real Worlds features 100 works from three of history’s most critical photobooks, Brassaï’s The Secret Paris of the 30s (1976), Nan Goldin’s The Ballad of Sexual Dependency (1986) and prints from the posthumous Diane Arbus: An Aperture Monograph (1972)...


The New York Times

At the last survey of new photography at the Museum of Modern Art two years ago, the atmosphere was so self-referential and hermetic that a visitor panted for oxygen. Often, the photos were images of images, taken off a computer screen or digitally created in the studio. It seemed as if photography, which continued to engage with the world after modernist painting and literature turned inward, had finally crumpled into solipsism.

A lot can change in two years...

News from the World of Photography: February 2018

*|MC:SUBJECT|*

Tate's first photography curator Simon Baker named new director of Maison Européenne de la Photographie


The Art Newspaper

Simon Baker, the Tate’s first photography curator, has been appointed director of the Maison Européenne de la Photographie (MEP), the prestigious photography centre in Paris. Baker will succeed Jean-Luc Monterosso, who has been the MEP's director since it opened in 1996 and whose mandate ends on 31 March.

Baker told The Art Newspaper that he intends to “devise a new and exciting programme of exhibitions that will showcase the best post-war and contemporary practice”.

Opening of the 8th edition of the Circulation(s) Festival


The Eye of Photography

Dedicated to young European photography, Circulation(s) festival offers for the eighth consecutive year a crossed perspective of Europe through photography. Its aim is to help the talents of young European photographers become visible and to allow their contemporary and artistic creations to be discovered. The program is articulated around photographers selected by a jury after an international call for applications, of guest photographers (from an art gallery and an art school) and photographers who participated in the carte blanche of this year’s godmother’s: Susan Bright, a British curator, teacher and author.Around this major exhibition gathering 50 European photographers, there is also; Little Circulation(s), a children’s exhibition, with a program and activities for a young audience; the Tribew Prize, which supports contemporary creation through publishing and distribution of digital books for art and culture; the public prize that rewards the visitors’ favorite among the exposed photographers; screenings, portfolios reviews and even outside exhibitions. Enjoy your visit!

The Earliest Days of American Photography


The New York Times LENS Blog
 

The most forged documents in financial history were the work of ordinary rascals who needed little skill to make money. All they needed was a camera.

Newspaper articles in the late 1850s began warning of the danger of counterfeit bank notes that had been made using photography. Both had appeared in the United States in the 1830s after President Andrew Jackson eliminated the federal banking system, allowing private banks to issue paper currency under guidelines set by each state. At one point, forgeries accounted for 40 percent of the nation’s currency, with photography often to blame.

“For a time, the ease of modification and duplication enabled by negative-positive photography seemed to be a threat rather than a benefit,” said Mazie Harris,  the curator of Paper Promises: Early American Photography, a new exhibition at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles which runs through May 27...

Photo Macau


Photo Macau
24 - 26 March 2018 


PHOTO MACAU | Art Fair is Asia’s newest international art fair dedicated to art photography and moving image, which aims to bring world-class fine art photography and video to one of Asia’s fastest growing economies.

Through a carefully curated collection of art and photo galleries from around the world, we aim to bring together the world’s leading photographers, curators, collectors, dealers and art lovers to become the art fair of reference in Asia for photography and moving image.

Ralph Gibson as you’ve never heard him!


The Eye of Photography
 

In a new exhibition at the Thierry Bigaignon Gallery, Ralph Gibson revisits his career… in music! Following the 2016 exhibition showing the recent, digital, large format color works of Ralph Gibson, the gallery offered the American artist to revisit fifteen of his most iconic photographs. Each photograph, shot between 1968 and 1990, comes with a musical piece which was specifically composed, played and recorded by the artist for this exhibit.

Working alongside Ralph Gibson in his New York studio, Thierry Bigaignon understood that music had a huge part in Gibson’s life. “Music is a universal language,” said the photographer. “All art strives to be music. Closing your eyes will turn any photograph 
in
an abstract souvenir. Music is different. It cannot be ignored. The ears don’t have eyelids!” The new exhibition all stems from that idea, the starting point of an unprecedented adventure...


The New York Times LENS Blog

By the time Ralph Gibson paid $4,000 to publish his first photography book, “The Somnambulist,” in 1970, he owed nine months’ rent at the Chelsea Hotel and two of his three Leicas were in pawn. He was 30, and he’d spent the three previous years — in his words — “constantly very, very broke,” reading Jorge Luis Borges, watching French New Wave films and meticulously crafting his surrealist collection of photographs at a time when art photography was not a viable commercial endeavor.

Nonetheless, it was the beginning of a long and successful career...

The Color of Humanity in Sally Mann’s South


The New Yorker
 

We’re in Virginia, where the photographer Sally Mann was born, in 1951, and where she still lives, making work so rooted in place that it is inseparable from history, from lore, and from the effects of slavery. Like Janus, she looks forward as she looks back, at all those bodies that made her and her place in Virginia, and into the landscape, filled with rutted earth, big or low clouds, storybook fantastic vegetation, and the Southern light that reminds so many of photography itself—dark, as Joan Didion wrote, and glowing “with a morbid luminescence.” That entire vision is a part of Mann’s photographs, as she asks in these images of family members, roads, rivers, churches, and the effects of blackness on whiteness and whiteness on itself: Abide with me. And it all does—voices, sounds, the invisible things that Mann’s haunted and haunting photo­graphs allow us to see....


The Guardian

He chased parades, ambushed hairdressers and refused to leave Ground Zero. Over PG Tips and ricotta at his Tuscan barn, Joel Meyerowitz relives his most stunning shots...

The Woman Who Was Robert Capa


Vantage


The year is 1936. On the outskirts of Barcelona, a small plane crash-lands. Miraculously, everyone on board survives, including two photographers, Robert Capa and Gerda Taro. They were risking their lives to cover the Spanish Civil War that had broken out months prior. Capa would take one of the most famous war photos in history. Taro would become the first female photographer to die in conflict — and be largely forgotten.

But it’s really a story about two identities so intertwined that it’s hard to keep them apart; difficult to know who’s who, who did what, and what it means to be a photographer...

 

Then They Came for Me: Incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II 


International Center of Photography (ICP)
New York, NY
26 January - 6 May 2018 

Then They Came for Me: Incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II examines a dark episode in US history when, in the name of national security, the government incarcerated 120,000 citizens and legal residents during World War II without due process or other constitutional protections to which they were entitled. Executive Order 9066, signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on February 19, 1942, set in motion the forced removal and imprisonment of all people of Japanese ancestry (citizens and non-citizens alike) living on or near the West Coast. This exhibition features works by renowned photographers Dorothea Lange, Ansel Adams, and others documenting the eviction of Japanese Americans and permanent Japanese residents from their homes as well as their subsequent lives in incarceration camps. Also included are photographs by incarcerated photographer Toyo Miyatake. This timely exhibition reexamines this history and presents new research telling the stories of the individuals whose lives were upended due to racial bigotry.

Peter Hujar: Speed of Life


The Morgan Library and Museum
New York, NY
26 January - 20 May 2018

 

The life and art of Peter Hujar (1934–1987) were rooted in downtown New York. Private by nature, combative in manner, well-read, and widely connected, Hujar inhabited a world of avant-garde dance, music, art, and drag performance. His mature career paralleled the public unfolding of gay life between the Stonewall uprising in 1969 and the AIDS crisis of the 1980s.

In his loft studio in the East Village, Hujar focused on those who followed their creative instincts and shunned mainstream success. He made, in his words, “uncomplicated, direct photographs of complicated and difficult subjects,” immortalizing moments, individuals, and subcultures passing at the speed of life.

Peter Hujar: Speed of Life—on view at the Morgan from January 26 through May 20—presents one hundred and forty photographs by this enormously important and influential artist. Drawn from the extensive holdings of his work at the Morgan and from nine other collections, the show and its catalog follow Hujar from his beginnings in the mid-1950s to his central role in the East Village art scene three decades later.

The Age of Gold and Daguerreotypes


The New York Times LENS Blog


The photographic process may depend on silver, but a new exhibit shows how gold — specifically, its discovery in California 170 years ago this week — was just as important as a subject for daguerreotypes. During the later half of the 19th century, gold fever was as intense — and short lived — as the nascent photographic process.

Gold and Silver: Images and Illusions of the Gold Rush, on view through April 2 at the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa, with a book co-published by the Canadian Photography Institute and RVB Books, explores the symbolism and materiality of precious metals: as a stabilizing element within the history of photography, and holding the promise of prosperity that shaped America...

Catherine Edelman Talks New Media


The Photography Show presented by AIPAD


"Some of the best work in the history of art comes out of anger and artists reacting to what’s happening. And that gives me hope."...

The Photography Show, held April 5-8 at Pier 94 in New York City, will feature more than 100 galleries from around the world. Two newly released videos show how the event brings together a community that fosters exceptional artists, nurtures the field of photography, and showcases the finest photography in the market. 

Roger Fenton: the First Great War Photographer


The New York Times LENS Blog

Robert Capa, the archetypical modern war photographer, once famously declared, “If your photographs aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough.” Good advice, though it didn’t apply to Roger Fenton, the godfather of the genre, who documented the Crimean War in 1855. That’s not just because he had to haul large cameras and unwieldy glass plate negatives (since fast Leica rangefinders had yet to be invented), but also because he shied away from photographing subjects that are now common: As a proper English gentleman, he wouldn’t photograph the corpses of soldiers, because doing so was unseemly.

Relying on long exposures made it impossible for Mr. Fenton to stop action and capture actual battles. But he did give the British public a view of the war by portraying the lives of British enlisted men and officers, as well as showing the armaments, supply routes and the many, many horses that were the critical military transportation technology of the day. He lived among the troops and traveled in a photo truck that doubled as his darkroom while photographing Russia’s defeat by an alliance that included Britain, France and the Ottoman Empire...


British Journal of Photography
 

Vanessa Winship’s biggest UK show to date, the first UK retrospective of Dorothea Lange, and a huge group exhibition including work by photographers such as Mary Ellen Mark, Dayanita Singh, Alec Soth, Chris Steele-Perkins, Daido Moriyama, Diane Arbus, Pieter Hugo, Bruce Davidson, and Boris Mikhailov – they’re all coming up this year at London’s Barbican Centre, in a season titled The Art of Change.

Running throughout the whole of 2018, The Art of Change season will explore “how artists respond to, reflect and potentially effect change in the social and political landscape”. The photography group show, Another Kind of Life: Photography at the Margins, opens from 28 February – 27 May, and includes 20 photographers selected by Barbican curator Alona Pardo. Bringing together over 300 works from the 1950s to now, including specialist magazines and photobooks as well as prints, the show considers photographers’ ongoing fascination with those on the margins of society and how they have engaged with these groups, and touches on themes such as gender, caste, gang culture, and street life.

Auction Results: Icons and Images: Photographs and Photobooks


Swann Galleries
15 February 2018

 

Joel Meyerowitz’s Career Is a Minihistory of Photography


The New York Times Magazine

1. Now wait a second, is this magic? Or has it all been carefully arranged with actors, lighting and special effects? The truth is more surprising: It’s neither. It’s simply a picture snapped by Joel Meyerowitz on a New York City street one day in 1975. No faces are immediately evident, just figures in camel-colored coats turned away from us, a puff of smoke with two people suspended in it. No, four people, if you count those shadows, six if you count the backs on which the shadows fall. In fact there are seven people, if we count the additional shadow in the foreground, the photographer’s — and further figures emerge as the eye adjusts to the deep background. It is a picture that just won’t sit still...

Multiple Medium: Photographs from the Collection


Cincinnati Art Museum
Cincinnati, OH
23 January - 25 March 2018


Photography is very good at making multiples. The capacity to produce many images and many copies of a given picture has raised doubts about photography’s status as a fine art medium throughout its history. Yet photographers of all kinds use series, sequence, combination, repetition and reproduction as potent artistic tools.

Drawn from the Museum’s rich photography collection, Multiple Medium presents rarely-seen treasures and recent acquisitions that illustrate and raise questions about the medium’s relationship with numerousness.

Ahmed Mater: Mecca Journeys


Brooklyn Museum
Brooklyn, NY
1 December 2017 - 8 April 2018


Ahmed Mater: Mecca Journeys takes visitors through the holiest city in the Islamic world. It presents a compelling portrait of the massive urban redevelopment now under way and its effects on residents and the millions of hajj pilgrims who travel there every year. Saudi artist Ahmed Mater has documented this unprecedented expansion for nearly a decade.

The exhibition is anchored by monumental photographs from his project Desert of Pharan: Unofficial Histories Behind the Mass Expansion of Mecca, alongside large-scale videos and installations. In addition to showing the influx of wealth, photographs detail the lives of workers on construction sites and of migrant groups.

"I need to be here, in the city of Mecca, now, experiencing, absorbing, and recording my place in this moment of transformation, after which things may never be the same again," states Mater. "It has become important for me to identify with this place and to understand how this constellation of change, as well as the forces that are shaping it, will affect the community of which I am a part."

Focusing on Mecca as both a symbolic site of worship and a contemporary urban center grappling with the consequences of unremitting growth, Mecca Journeys presents a portrait of the complex cultural dynamics at work in the city today.

Ellen Carey: Dings, Pulls, and Shadows



Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Fort Worth, TX
17 January - 22 July 2018


Since the 1990s, experimental photographer Ellen Carey has been making photographs that defy photographic conventions of depicting identifiable subjects. Instead, her works depict vibrant fields of color that are meditations on the very nature of photography as an image created by the action of light on a light-sensitive surface. The exhibition Ellen Carey: Dings, Pulls, and Shadows features seven key works that explore the artist’s interest in color, light, and the photographic process as the subject of her practice.

Frida Kahlo: Her Photos


Glenbow
Calgary, Canada
3 February - 21 May 2018


Glenbow is pleased to present the first Canadian showing of Frida Kahlo: Her Photos, an exhibition that has traveled to 12 cities in 7 countries, and has received more than half a million visitors.

For the first time in this country, visitors will be able to see a treasure trove of images previously locked away in the Kahlo estate archives for more than 50 years.

Frida Kahlo’s distinctive, colourful self-portraits and extraordinary life have made her one of the most recognized artists of the twentieth century. Less well known is her special relationship with photography. Throughout her life, Kahlo meticulously collected photographs of herself and her loved ones as well as scenes of Mexican culture, politics, art, history and nature. The exhibition Frida Kahlo: Her Photos gives us the opportunity to better understand the woman behind the artist: her origins, her roots, her friendships and romantic relationships, her constant fight with her fragile health, her political tendencies, and the strong role that photography played in her life and work.


International Center of Photography (ICP)
Caixa Forum Seville

Seville, Spain
7 February - 13 May 2018



This exhibition presents Robert Capa’'s color work for the first time. Capa regularly used color film from the 1940s until his death in 1954. Some of these photographs were published in magazines of the day, but the majority have never been printed, seen, or even studied. Over the years, this aspect of Capa’s career has virtually been forgotten. With over 100 contemporary color prints by the famous photojournalist, Capa in Color presents this work an integral part of his post-war career and fundamental in remaining relevant to magazines...

Capa in Color will explore how he started to see anew with color film and how his work adapted to a new postwar sensibility. The new medium required him to readjust to color compositions, but also to a postwar audience, interested in being entertained and transported to new places.

Capa in Color is drawn entirely from the Robert Capa Archive in ICP’s permanent collection. The Archive contains roughly 4,200 color transparencies - 35mm Kodachrome, 21⁄4 Ektachrome, and some larger Kodachrome sheet film. It also includes thousands of vintage black-and-white prints, negatives, tearsheets, and papers.

World Press Photo 2018 Photo Contest


World Press Photo
 

View the entire collection of images nominated for the 2018 World Press Photo Contest. The winners of the 61st World Press Photo of the Year and first, second and third prizes will be announced on the evening of Thursday 12 April at the World Press Photo Awards Show in Amsterdam.


The Guardian

The Representation of the People Act 1918 added 8.5 million women – those over 30 who owned property or were graduates voting in a university constituency – to the electoral roll. It extended the parliamentary vote to some women and paved the way for universal suffrage 10 years later. It also gave the vote to 5.6 million more men after their voting age was lowered to 21 and the property qualification abolished. The general election in December 1918 consulted an electorate three times the size of the one before it...

Photography: The First 150 Years


Dominic Winter Auctioneers
Gloucestershire, UK
9 March 2018

 

The Lesser-Known Photos of Gordon Parks, from Fashion to Artists’ Portraits


Hyperallergic

A perplexed giraffe peers from behind a woman bundled in a purple printed headscarf. She’s holding an umbrella, whose pattern of brown shapes framed by yellow borders mimics that of the animal. Photographer Gordon Parks captured the giraffe mid side-eyed glance, as if it’s thinking, “who is this woman and why is she stealing my look?” In a nearby image, a woman wearing a tiered wedding cake of a red ball gown, her diamond barrette like frosting, nestles into her date. They’re standing in the middle of busy Park Avenue, but they might as well be the only two people in the world...
 

30 PHOTOS FROM THE PRINT SWAP TO BE EXHIBITED AT MOPLA


feature shoot

The Print Swap, a worldwide initiative by Feature Shoot, is heading to the Month of Photography Los Angeles (MOPLA) this April in an exhibition curated by Paul Kopeikin, the director of the internationally renowned Kopeikin Gallery. All images included in The Print Swap are printed and mailed at random to participating photographers around the world, and thirty standout photographs from the last few months are part of this exhibition. Selected artists hail from points around the map, with exhibiting photographers based in the United States, Canada, Mexico, the UK, Germany, Norway, Ireland, Switzerland, and Malaysia.

A dreamlike thread runs through Kopeikin’s selections, from Cameron Karsten’s upside-down Puget Sound and Ellen Jantzen’s digitally altered New Mexico to the snow-covered street scenes of Stephen Chong and Navid Baraty, Merethe Wessel-Berg, and Garrod Kirkwood. Reflections of various sorts appear in work by Tori Gagne, Brindha Anantharaman, Andy Grant, Asher Carey, Cristian Ordonez, and Molly McDonough Mahler. Don Hudson takes us back in time with his 1974 photograph from Ann Arbor, Michigan. Wherever they roam, these 29 photographers bring with them a magical sense of the surreal.

The definitive Brassaï show, curated by ex-MoMA star Peter Galassi


The British Journal of Photography

It would be an understatement to say that the legacy of Gyula Halász – better known by his pseudonym, Brassaï – has been the object of extensive research and countless curatorial  projects. Yet the Fundación Mapfre, the private institution that has shown the highest devotion to photography in Spain, has entrusted Peter Galassi, the former chief curator of photography at Museum of Modern Art, to conduct what will probably be the definitive exhibition about the Hungarian-French photographer at its Barcelona gallery, the Garriga i Nogués exhibition hall (19 February to 13 May).

The exhibition could be considered to be Galassi’s biggest curatorial endeavour so far since he retired from MoMA, and the catalogue, published by Fundación Mapfre, can attest to the pertinence of this major survey of Brassaï, even after previous approaches carried out by John Szarkowski, Agnès de Gouvion-Saint-Cyr, Peter Pollack, Sylvie Aubenas, Quentin Bajac, Manuel Borja- Villel, Alain Sayag and Catherine Troiano, to name but a few...

 

Auction Result: MOMA: Bill Brandt


Christie's 
Online Auction

16 - 24 January 2018

‘MoMA: Bill Brandt’ is part of the next installment of online-only auctions of photographs from The Museum of Modern Art, New York, being sold to benefit the acquisition fund for the Museum’s Department of Photography. This auction brings together images by influential British photographer Bill Brandt (1904–1983) that span both his important reportages as well as his bold explorations of the female nude. Most of the prints in this grouping were made on the occasion of the landmark exhibition Bill Brandt presented by the Museum in 1969, signaling the first major exhibition in the United States dedicated to the artist’s work. This auction contains 43 photographs ranging from $2,000 to $10,000. 

PHOTOCULTURE: Interview with Ken Gonzales-Day

PHOTOCULTURE: Interview with Ken Gonzales-Day

"On the one hand we'd love to see all such boundaries disappear, and on the other hand, we're also trying to see that the different concerns, interests, and histories of particular communities are somehow reflected in the landscape, and in the museums, institutions, and newspapers that represent this city on some level."