PHOTOCULTURE Conversations #20: Sheila Bergman

Sheila Bergman is the Executive Director of UCR ARTS. Bergman oversees the California Museum of Photography and Barbara and Art Culver Center of the Arts. We talked about her vision for the museum and the desire to engage with the photography community at home and worldwide.

“What do we want our legacy to be? And what impact do we want to have?

News from the World of Photography: March 2019

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Beautiful and Unclichéd Photographs of Japanese Landscapes


AnOther
 

Spanish photographic duo Albarrán Cabrera first travelled to Japan six years ago, and have returned there every year since. Turning their lens to Japan’s landscapes and characters, Anna P Cabrera and Angel Albarrán offer a new perspective on the nation through their images via their choice of subject and innovative method of processing images – the pair incorporate both modern and traditional printing techniques into their practice, with additions such as Japanese paper and gold leaf bringing a distinctive warmth and unique palette to their colour prints...

Debunking the Myths of Robert Capa on D-Day


PetaPixel

I want to give you a brief overview of an investigation that began almost five years ago, led by me but involving the efforts of photojournalist J. Ross Baughman, photo historian Rob McElroy, and ex-infantryman and amateur military historian Charles Herrick.

Our project, in a nutshell, dismantles the 74-year-old myth of Robert Capa’s actions on D-Day, June 6, 1944, and the subsequent fate of his negatives. If you have even a passing familiarity with the history of photojournalism, or simply an awareness of twentieth-century cultural history on both sides of the Atlantic, you’ve surely heard the story; it’s been repeated hundreds, possibly thousands of times:

Robert Capa landed on Omaha Beach with the first wave of assault troops at 0630 on the morning of June 6, 1944 (D-Day), on freelance assignment from LIFE magazine.

He stayed there for 90 minutes, until he either inexplicably ran out of film or his camera jammed...

Rare 19th-century images show China at the dawn of photography


CNN Style
 
Before the arrival of photography, the Western imagination of China was based on paintings, written travelogues and dispatches from a seemingly far-off land. From the 1850s, however, a band of pioneering Western photographers sought to capture the country's landscapes, cities and people, captivating audiences back home and sparking a homegrown photography movement in the process. Among them were the Italian Felice Beato, who arrived in China in the 1850s to document Anglo-French exploits in the Second Opium War, and Scottish photographer John Thompson, whose journey up the Min River offered people in the West a rare look into the country's remote interior.

These are just some of the figures whose work features in a 15,000-strong photo collection amassed by New York antiquarian and collector Stephan Loewentheil. His 19th-century images span street scenes, tradespeople, rural life and architecture, showing -- in unprecedented detail -- everything from blind beggars to camel caravans on the Silk Road...

Patti Smith’s Talismanic Photos from Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera’s Home and Beyond


The New Yorker

In 2012, Patti Smith traveled to Mexico City to speak and perform at La Casa Azul, the former home of the artists Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. While visiting the property, which now serves as a museum, Smith took several black-and-white Polaroid photographs of objects she encountered: a pair of crutches that belonged to Kahlo; her worn corset; a white coverlet with crocheted trim, dangling from a wooden bed frame. Those images are part of a new exhibit of Smith’s photographs, titled “Wing,” which is now on display at the Diego Rivera Gallery, at the San Francisco Art Institute, adjacent to Rivera’s 1931 mural “The Making of a Fresco Showing the Building of a City.”...

Busy living everything with everyone, everywhere, all of the time


The British Journal of Photography

 Since he was first named director of the Maison Européenne de la Photographie, the centre for contemporary arts situated in the heart of Paris’ historic 4th arrondissement, one year ago, Simon Baker – formerly the Tate’s first-ever photography curator – has had to resist the urge to throw open the windows.

“It’s an old hôtel particulier, so it has very grand rooms, but they are essentially domestic spaces,” he says of the exhibition halls perused by the public since 1996. “At the moment I want to leave all the curtains and the windows open. You have this feeling of an opening up of the space.”...

 

The Electric Intimacy of Alice Springs


The Cut

It’s a joy to contemplate the photography of June Newton, a.k.a. Alice Springs. The Australian-born Springs is the 95-year-old widow of the provocative fashion photographer Helmut Newton, but that’s the least interesting thing about her.

Under Springs’s gaze, world-famous actresses like Catherine Deneuve, Charlotte Rampling, and Audrey Hepburn look like people, not icons — conversational, intent, their eyes telegraphing depths beneath. Springs respects their beauty, but doesn’t accept it as a mask. There are shadows beneath Deneuve’s perfect features; Hepburn looks gorgeous, but her age.

Vivid personalities leap from Springs’s portraits, which depict not just her subjects but her dialogue with them. Early on, Springs decided to forgo studio portraits and photograph people on their own territory, peeling back the protective facades that prominent people — especially the famous and beautiful — often construct...

The Extended Moment: Photographs from the National Gallery of Canada

The Morgan Library and Museum
New York, NY
Through 26 May 2019


The Extended Moment brings forth around seventy works that reveal the historical, technological, and aesthetic breadth of the collection, which is little known in this country. In the exhibition’s presentation at the Morgan, works of far-flung origins are placed side-by-side to highlight recurring trends and tensions in the history of the medium. Artists include Edward Burtynsky, Julia Margaret Cameron, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Lynne Cohen, John Herschel, Richard Learoyd, Lisette Model, Gordon Parks, Edward Steichen, and Josef Sudek.


The New Yorker

In 2007, Guy retrieved her pictures from Struth’s storage facility. The occasion was a show at White Columns, the venerable downtown nonprofit space, spotlighting the work of six art dealers who started as artists (one surprising inclusion was the power player Jeffrey Deitch). But it wasn’t until a 2015 solo outing at Cleopatra’s, the side project of a group of enterprising young women with day jobs in New York galleries, that interest in Guy’s work began to intensify. Last year, Hunters Point Press published Guy’s first eponymous monograph, a beautiful, slender book. Until March 9th, you can see Guy’s early work on view at the Upper East Side gallery Higher Pictures...

Polly Penrose Self-Portrait as an Accessory


The Eye of Photography

“My body is a prop.” _ Polly Penrose

Polly Penrose, an English photographer, makes her normal woman’s body (that’s how she defines herself) an accessory in response to a place, usually a home emptied of her residents.

The London photographer began by practicing self-portraits on the sly in houses waiting for new buyers. The procedure was and is still the same.

First, find out about and ask for permission from real estate agencies, painstakingly explaining the purpose of the process, judged in many cases, strange or even disturbing.

Then go on the spot, to impregnate the disused home while being attentive to the residual traces, to the geometry of the banality of the suburban houses.

Finally, perform self-timer snapshots in a handful of seconds, rush, pose hiding her face and, in most cases, achieve a disastrous or unwanted effect, accompanied by hematomas or small accidental injuries...

Mona Kuhn’s Abstraction of Being


The British Journal of Photography

"I wanted to stop time with photography. That's another reason I got into nudes, for the timeless aspect,” says Mona Kuhn, who has just published her sixth book with Steidl

“I got into photography because I’m a little restless, and I liked that it was fast,” says Brazilian photographer Mona Kuhn, who has just published her sixth book with Steidl, She Disappeared Into Complete Silence. Even so, the speed of photography haunted her, as Kuhn feared that her photographs would be consumed then discarded – like so many of the magazines she read and tossed away. “I wanted to stop time with photography,” she says. “That’s another reason I got into nudes, for the timeless aspect.”...

JOEL MEYEROWITZ: Selections from the Series “Aftermath”


The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College
Collegeville, PA
Until 11 May 2019


The people of New York City have always been an inspiration to Bronx-born photographer Joel Meyerowitz. Heavily influenced by the street photography of Robert Frank and Henri Cartier-Bresson, Meyerowitz captured his subjects with a compact 35mm camera. In the 1960s, when he began his investigation into street photography, he was unaware that he would become one of the first advocates of color photography. Now, his vibrantly colored and vividly patterned photographs of New Yorkers are some of his best-known artworks.

Discovering Contemporary Mexico Beyond the Daily Headlines: The Images of Graciela Iturbide


The Washington Post

What are the images that define contemporary Mexico? In the foreign eye, they are pictures of migrant caravans, escaped drug traffickers, beaches conjured by the American imagination.

Joan Didion once wrote of the Mexican state of Durango, “The very name hallucinates.” And so it seems with the country as a whole, a nation distorted in the public imagination for decades, reduced to a convenient caricature. It’s hard not to see the ellipses between that iconography and an American president whose politics hinge on the idea of a lawless Mexico, unpierced by nuance.

Which is why 2019 is the appropriate year for the world to discover Graciela Iturbide, who now has extensive exhibitions in Boston and Mexico City. For a half-century, Iturbide has traveled across her own country with a camera loaded with black-and-white film. She has taken pictures that are often described as dreamlike, surreal or painterly, but those words fall short...

An Unflinching View of Venezuela in Crisis


The New Yorker

Alejandro Cegarra’s photo series “State of Decay” is an unflinching portrait of Venezuela’s collapse. How this country went from being one of Latin America’s richest societies to one of its poorest is a disaster of bewildering proportions, one that defies easy explanation.

Venezuela has the largest proven oil reserves in the world, but since the 2014 crash in world oil prices, on which Venezuela depended for more than ninety percent of its export revenues, its economy has contracted continuously, unleashing an economic crisis worse than that experienced by Americans during the Great Depression.

In the past five years, three million of Venezuela’s thirty-two million people have fled the country. More than half of all Venezuelans lack enough food to meet their daily needs. The country’s hospital system has all but failed; countless Venezuelans have died owing to a lack of medical attention and the scarcity of medicines for treatable illnesses. Hyperinflation is expected to reach ten million percent this year. On top of everything else, Venezuela’s murder rate is among the world’s highest, making it one of the most dangerous countries in the world to live in...

Daido Moriyama: Hasselblad Award Winner 2019


The Hasselblad Foundation

The Hasselblad Foundation is pleased to announce that Japanese photographer Daido Moriyama is the recipient of the 2019 Hasselblad Foundation International Award in Photography for the sum of SEK 1,000,000 (approx. USD 110,000). The award ceremony will take place in Gothenburg, Sweden on October 13, 2019. A symposium will be held on October 14, followed by the opening of an exhibition of Moriyama’s work at the Hasselblad Center, and the release of a new book about the artist, published by Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König.

A Year of Quiet Contemplation Led to the Rebirth of Alec Soth’s Photography


The New York Times LENS Blog

After meditating during a flight to Helsinki, Alec Soth took a walk, sat down by a lake, and had an experience that could only be described as transcendental.

“It’s goofy talking about such a thing, but there were tears running down my face, the whole package,” he said. “Afterwards, walking back to my hotel, every time I saw someone I was like, ‘I love that person.’ It was probably not unlike what people experience on LSD.”

The experience in 2016, he said, changed the way he saw the world and, by extension, how he viewed his creative life. Mr. Soth had been a successful photographer for more than a decade. He had first drawn wide acclaim after his 2004 book, “Sleeping by the Mississippi,” and built a reputation as a skilled chronicler of American life in the tradition of photographers like Walker Evans and Robert Frank. He was, as the New York Times critic Hilarie M. Sheets once noted, especially adept at “finding chemistry with strangers,” particularly “loners and dreamers” he met in his travels...

Through a New Lens


What Will You Remember?

Whether or not you are fighting winter doldrums, here is a little show with big heart that’s sure to lift your spirits. It highlights a transformative slice of photographic history, the period following WWII. Feeling both relief and elation at having survived the war, unfettered European photographers invented an exuberant new genre that celebrated daily life. “Postwar Visions: European Photography, 1945-60” sheds light on this enduring burst of innovation at the MFA, Boston through June 23rd, 2019.

The horrors of war saw a robust backlash of humanism in the arts. For photography, the movement started in Germany with Otto Steinert, a former physician who created the collective known as “Subjektive Fotografie” (Subjective Photography). The group sought to elevate the ordinary and bring a sense of awe to the banal. This brought photography into the realm of abstraction, directly building upon tenets developed before the war at the Bauhaus, Germany’s legendary school of art, architecture and design founded by Walter Gropius a century ago in 1919 and shuttered by the Nazi regime just fourteen years later in 1933...

Beyond Truth: Photography After the Shutter


The Cleveland Museum of Art
Cleveland, OH
Through 26 May 2019


Just how truthful is photography? Despite the ability to manipulate selfies on our cell phones, many of us cling to the illusion that the medium has an inherent connection to truth. Even if a camera produces an accurate recording of a scene in front of the lens, many changes can be wrought during the transition from captured light to printed image. Beyond Truth explores figurative scenes and portraits in which artists have altered the “truth” through postproduction techniques ranging from composite printing, multiple exposures, and handwork on negatives and prints to digital capture and manipulation.

The exhibition, which includes photographs from the Akron Art Museum and the Fred and Laura Ruth Bidwell Collection, is drawn largely from the Cleveland Museum of Art’s holdings. The show marks the debut of 13 works owned by the museum, 7 of which are recent acquisitions. Among those are a 1936 retelling of the Narcissus myth by French photographer Laure Albin Guillot and a “portrait” by Trevor Paglen that was produced in 2017 not with a camera but by an Artificial Intelligence.

Ralph Eugene Meatyard: Stages for Being


Bates College Museum of Art
Lewiston, ME
25 October 2019 – 28 March 2020


Ralph Eugene Meatyard (1925–1972) moved to Lexington, Kentucky in 1950 and developed a passion for photography along with a career as an optician. Over the next two decades, he created the enigmatic images that would secure his place in the history of the medium by consciously challenging the concept of the camera as a mere recorder of the world. Meatyard’s photographs are seldom seen in Maine. Stages for Being celebrates his legacy with over eighty vintage prints chosen to explore his innovative practice of staging photographs.

PHOTOCULTURE Conversations #18: Darius Himes

Darius Himes is the International Head of Christie’s. We talk about the inner workings of the auction world, the emotional dynamics of auction bidding, and some of the treasures that he’s had the privilege to work with.

Himes is responsible for setting and implementing a global strategy for the department and managing the international team. He is based in New York, and brings with him a rich knowledge of the history of the medium, with a keen interest in the contemporary market. Most recently Himes was director of Fraenkel Gallery in San Francisco. Prior to that, he was a co-founder of Radius Books, a non-profit publisher of books on art and photography, and a founding editor of photo-eye Booklist, a quarterly magazine devoted to photography books. A widely respected lecturer and writer on photography and photobooks, his most recent title, Publish Your Photography Book, was co-authored and published in 2011. He received his Masters of Arts from St. John's College and his Bachelor of Fine Art’s degree in Photography from Arizona State University. Himes also lived in Haifa, Israel, where he oversaw and worked with a permanent collection of over 50,000 photographic objects drawn primarily from the Near and Middle East and dating as early as the 1870s.

We spoke on August 16 at Christie's Beverly Hills. 

Spotlight: Gabriel Figueroa and the Knotty the Aesthetics of the Female Body


AI-AP

Gabriel Figueroa’s series “Nodum” is a study in landscapes.
The project matches the landscapes of the female body with the desert landscape of Cuatro Ciénegas in the State of Coahuila
northen Mexico — one of the few places in the world, Figueroa notes, “to have gypsum dunes, warm pools in the middle of the desert and a marble quarry.” The work was also inspired and influenced by pre-Raphaelite paintings and the Japanese art of rope binding called shibari, as well as other icons from photography and paintings.

“However, as in all creative processes, this project followed its own evolutionary path and the resulting images are the consequence of an organic and spontaneous creative flow,” notes the photographer.

“In this manner, different implicit lines of work can be identified throughout these images,” he writes in his artist’s statement. “On one side, the fantasy of the nude female body, enveloped by the embrace of intricate knots; that surround it and invigorate the eroticism in an open-air setting. On the other hand, the quiet stillness of the landscape echoes the silent submission implicit in the bindings. Yet there are other elements that can be observed: the vestige, the marks, the ephemeral scar, the kiss of the rope as a symbolic element of the interventions on the human body and on the desertic landscape.”...

Portrait of Humanity: The Anonymous Project is restoring our collective memory, one colour slide at a time


The British Journal of Photography

Founded in 2017, the project has already rescued 700,000 colour slides, which tell the story ‘of all our lives’

When filmmaker Lee Shulman bought a box of vintage slides from
Ebay, he was hoping for some blurry snaps to flick through on a Sunday afternoon, and maybe a picture or two to keep. But when they arrived, ‘I nearly fell off my seat.’  What he saw amazed him: here were hundreds of snapshots of strangers’ lives. The poses were instantly recognisable: children grinning over birthday cakes, couples squinting on the beach – the simple magic of unstaged life, captured in rich Kodachrome colour.

The price of
colour
photography plummeted in the early Fifties, allowing people to snap away with newfound freedom. But the chemicals that produce the slides fade over time. If the photos were to disappear, then with them so would the memories of our collective human experience – and Shulman didn’t want to let that happen...

Untroubled Irving Glenn


MINA Image Centre
Beirut, Lebanon
16 January - 28 April 2019

 
Irving Penn (1917-2009), recognized as one of the masters of photography of the twentieth century, is widely admired for his iconic images of high fashion and for the remarkable portraits of the artists, writers, and celebrities who defined the cultural landscapes of his time. 

Drawing inspiration from Resonance, an exhibition organized by the Pinault Collection in 2014 at the Palazzo Grassi in Venice, the exhibition Untroubled seeks first and foremost to pay tribute to the photographer’s unique legacy.

The exhibition presents the photographs not in a linear, chronological sequence but arranged in a manner that brings out their subliminal affinities. Commercial projects cohabit with ethnographic studies, discarded refuse with sophisticated models, cultural celebrities with animal skulls. 

As Penn remarked, “It is all one thing”.

New Southern Photography


Ogden Museum of Southern Art
New Orleans, LA
6 October 2018 - 10 March 2019


New Southern Photography highlights the exciting and diverse breadth of photography being practiced in the American South today. The largest photography exhibition at the Ogden Museum to date, this exhibition features the work of twenty-five emerging, mid-career and established photographers. Each photographer is individually showcased with a monographic installation focusing on a single body of work within the context of a group exhibition. All types of lens-formed imagery are included from traditional analog and digital still photography to video installation and new media. New Southern Photography is available for travel to other institutions through 2021.

New Southern Photography explores the role photography plays in formulating the visual iconography of the modern New South. Regional identity in an interconnected and global world is central to the exhibition’s narrative. Themes and ideas addressed in New Southern Photography
include: memory, the experience of place in the American South, cultural mythology and reality, deep familial connections to the land, the tension between the past and present, and the transitory nature of change in the New South.

The goal of New Southern Photography is to create a space for conversation about the region. This exhibition not only highlights recent contributions the American South has made to the world through
photography, but serves as a platform to broaden the understanding and appreciation of this complicated, contested and often misunderstood region. New Southern Photography follows in the rich tradition of Southern literature, where storytelling is paramount.

Then They Came for Me: Incarceration of Japanese Americans During WWII and the Demise of Civil Liberties


The Eye of Photography

 Then They Came for Me: Incarceration of Japanese Americans during WWII and the Demise of Civil Liberties examines the terrifying period in U.S. history when the government scapegoated and imprisoned thousands of people of Japanese ancestry. This multimedia exhibition draws parallels to tactics chillingly resurgent today featuring imagery by noted American photographers Dorothea Lange and Ansel Adams, alongside works by incarcerated Japanese American artists Toyo Miyatake and Miné Okubo.

Presented by the Jonathan Logan Family Foundation in partnership with the National Japanese American Historical Society and J-Sei, the exhibition tells the story of the forced removal of 120,000 Japanese American citizens and legal residents from their homes during World War II without due process or other constitutional protections.

 

‘I Ranged Far and Wide’: Dawoud Bey on Imagining the Paths of Fugitive Slaves

ARTNEWS

When Chicago-based artist Dawoud Bey traveled to the outskirts of Cleveland in late 2017, he found a landscape largely unchanged since thousands of slaves had crossed it 200 years ago, seeking freedom in the north. There were no telephone lines or cell towers, just the scraggly brush that had made the passage so treacherous. “I ranged far and wide out there, since there were expansive rural landscapes that looked as they might have in the 18th and 19th centuries,” Bey said recently in an extensive email interview. “The landscape and history there has not been built over.”

Bey was at work on his series of black-and-white silver gelatin photographs, “Night Coming Tenderly, Black,” commissioned by Front International: Cleveland Triennial for Contemporary Art and now on view at the Art Institute of Chicago. The exhibition caps off an eventful couple of years for Bey that kicked off with his winning a coveted MacArthur “Genius” grant in fall 2017. Last summer, Front premiered “Night Coming Tenderly, Black” in Cleveland’s St. John’s Episcopal Church, once a stop on the Underground Railroad. Then September brought the publication of “Seeing Deeply,” a 400-page monograph from the University of Texas Press, as well as the opening of an exhibition at the National Gallery in Washington, DC, of his “Birmingham Project” photographs. (That show is up through March 24) In 2020 the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art will give Bey a full retrospective...

Graciela Iturbide’s Photos of Mexico Make ‘Visible What, to Many, Is Invisible’

The New York Times LENS Blog

Graciela Iturbide may be one of the most renowned photographers working today. Five decades into her journey with a camera, her work, most famously in indigenous communities in her native Mexico, has achieved that rare trifecta — admired by critics, revered by fellow photographers and adored by the public. She continues to travel, photograph and exhibit all over the world.

But it is becoming impossible to discuss her work without mentioning the Zapotec woman wearing live iguanas on her head. 

Ms. Iturbide made the photo after happening upon Zobeida Díaz at a farmer’s market while living with the Juchitán of southeastern Oaxaca in 1979. It took several tries — the iguanas kept moving around, falling off, reducing her subject to laughter — but on her contact sheet, Ms. Iturbide found her “Nuestra Señora de las Iguanas (Our Lady of the Iguanas),” an image so arresting that 40 years later, its popularity is still growing...


The British Journal of Photography
 

The World Press Photo Foundation has announced the six talents from North and Central America in its ongoing 6×6 Global Talent Program. Aimed at picking out under-recognized visual story-tellers from around the world, the 6×6 programme is now on its fifth region, out of the six identified around the world. This time, the talents picked out were: Dylan Hausthor, USA; Ian Willms, Canada; Mariceu Erthal García, Mexico; Nydia Blas, USA; Tomas Ayuso, Honduras; and Yael Esteban Martínez Velázquez, Mexico...

Over 6,000 Ottoman-Era Photographs Now Available Online


Hyperallergic

The Getty Research Institute has recently digitized over 6,000 19th- and early 20th-century Ottoman-era photographs, collected in the 1980s by French collector Pierre de Gigord during his travels through Turkey. The collection is now available to study and download for free online.

The photos encompass various walks of Ottoman life, depicting “landmark architecture, urban and natural landscapes, archeological sites of millennia-old civilizations, and the bustling life of the diverse people who lived over 100 years ago in the last decades of the waning Ottoman Empire,” according to the Iris, the Getty Research Institute’s blog.

The collection includes a 10-part panorama of Constantinople, which required stitching separate prints together to create a panoramic view of the Istanbul skyline in 1878. The shots can now be viewed in their entirety on a single screen. 82 glass plate negatives were digitized, along with 60 photographic albums documenting scenes of Ottoman life. Each individual image in the albums was photographed and digitized, allowing viewers to see up-close details alongside the calligraphic image captions...

Ansel Adams in Our Time


Museum of Fine Arts Boston
Boston, MA
13 December 2018 – 24 February 2019


Ansel Adams in Our Time traces the iconic visual legacy of Ansel Adams (1902–1984), presenting some of his most celebrated prints, from a symphonic view of snow-dusted peaks in The Tetons and Snake River, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming (1942) to an aerial shot of a knotted roadway in Freeway Interchange, Los Angeles (1967). The exhibition looks both backward and forward in time: his black-and-white photographs are displayed alongside prints by several of the 19th-century government survey photographers who greatly influenced Adams, as well as work by contemporary artists whose modern-day concerns centered on the environment, land rights, and the use and misuse of natural resources point directly to Adams’ legacy.

Adams’ stunning images were last on view at the MFA in a major exhibition in 2005; this new, even larger presentation places his work in the context of the 21st century, with all that implies about the role photography has played—and continues to play—in our changing perceptions of the land. The Adams photographs in the exhibition are drawn from the Lane Collection, one of the largest and most significant gifts in MFA history.

Telfair Museums Receives Donation of Works by American Photographer Bruce Davidson


Telfair Museums
Savannah, GA

Telfair Museums announced the acquisition of 347 photographs by photographer Bruce Davidson (American, B. 1933). This anonymous gift is a transformational addition to the museum’s permanent collection by a world-renowned photographer whose work is in significant museum collections across the world, including at the Art Institute of Chicago, the National Gallery of Art, and MoMA, among others.

The collection spans Davidson’s career from 1956 to 2008 and includes images from his most well-known series including Circus (1958), Brooklyn Gang (1959), Time of Change (1961-1965), East 100th Street (1970), a study of poverty and discrimination in Harlem, and Subway (1980), an essay on a particular American subculture.

Davidson is a prolific photographer recognized for his humanistic portrayals of all walks of life. Erin Dunn, Assistant Curator at Telfair Museums has curated Telfair’s photography collection since 2014 and says, “History and human nature are deftly revealed through the empathetic eye of Bruce Davidson. This momentous gift not only allows us to revel in the individual photographs of Davidson, but to appreciate his entire career’s worth of noteworthy subjects and imagery. The photographs stand on their own, but will also complement themes and subject matters already evident in Telfair Museums’ permanent collection.”

Photography plays a prominent role in Telfair’s robust schedule of annual exhibitions, and in recent years the museum has also traveled photography exhibitions drawn from its permanent collection to museums in New York, California, Texas, Florida, and Wisconsin. “It is difficult to overstate the impact that this gift will have on Telfair’s photography collection,” says Courtney McNeil, Chief Curator & Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs at Telfair Museums. “The foundation of the museum’s photography collection is one of the country’s largest collections of work by New York street photographer Helen Levitt, and Davidson’s work has many rich thematic parallels to that body of work.”

A Hundred Heroines: female photographers in the spotlight


The Guardian

Following a campaign by the Royal Photographic Society to highlight modern female photographers in a male-dominated profession, a list of a Hundred Heroines was announced on 14 December, 100 years since British women first voted in a general election...

The First Photograph


Harry Ransom Center
The University of Texas at Austin

After developing heliography and the First Photograph, Niépce traveled to England where he showed his invention to botanical illustrator Francis Bauer at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Bauer recognized the importance of Niépce's work and encouraged him to write about his invention for a presentation to the Royal Society. Although his proposal was rejected, Niépce left his handwritten memoir and his heliograph specimens (including the First Photograph) with Bauer, who dutifully inscribed the gifts, labeled them 1827 (the year of their presentation to him), and set them aside.

During the nineteenth century, the First Photograph passed from Bauer's estate through a variety of hands. After its last public exhibition in 1905, it slipped into obscurity. In 1952, photo-historians Helmut and Alison Gernsheim were able to locate the First Photograph when they were contacted by the widow of Gibbon Pritchard, who had found the Niépce heliograph in her husband's estate after his death. The Gernsheims verified the photograph's authenticity, and obtained it for their collection.

News from the World of Photography: December 2018

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Unearthing Photography’s Time Capsule


The New York Times

In March of 1985, the photographer Robert Frank arrived with a paper sack at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston to use Polaroid’s 20-by-24-inch camera. It was a hulking beast of an apparatus, worlds away from the diminutive 35-millimeter Leica that had freed him to roam the country while shooting “The Americans,” the 1959 book of photos that crowned him a king of counterculture and the most imitated photographer alive today.

He emptied the bag of salvaged miscellany he’d brought to shoot, jotted a few cryptic words on bits of paper, and then pinned them together with old photos and other ephemera onto timeworn corkboards. In the resulting six-paneled work — “Boston, March 20, 1985” we see the corkboards arranged in grids like signs at an old grocer’s. Few clues reveal Frank’s intentions, but we know that his fellow trailblazing photographers, Robert Heinecken, Dave Heath and John Wood, were somehow involved: The images show scrawled dedications to them.

The four renowned artists were brought together by two photographic historians, Susan E. Cohen and William S. Johnson, who pulled off a curatorial feat that would be unimaginable today. They persuaded Mr. Frank, Mr. Heinecken, Mr. Heath and Mr. Wood to collaborate with them on a project whose contours were hazy at best. And then they persuaded the Polaroid Corporation to finance it...

On View: The Extraordinary Lives and Work of Martine Franck and Inge Morath
 

ProPhoto Daily


“Martine, I want to come and see your contact sheets.”

That was what Henri Cartier-Bresson said when he first met Martin Franck in 1966. The two were married in 1970 (despite a 30-year age difference) and shared a passion for photography. But Franck’s own career as a photographer was overshadowed by that of her husband, one of the founders of the Magnum photo collective. Franck admits she put her husband’s career ahead of her own. It wasn’t always easy.

“A painful example comes from the year in which they were
married, when the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London sent out invitations to what was to be Franck’s first solo exhibition which highlighted her husband’s name and his presence at the launch. She promptly cancelled the show,” notes AnOther.

Now an exhibition at the 
Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson (through Feb. 10, 2019) shines an overdue spotlight on Franck’s work. The retrospective of 140 images serves also as a debut for the Fondation’s new and expanded space in Paris’s Marais district.

Meanwhile, the work and extraordinary life of pioneering Magnum photographer Inge Morath is celebrated in the new book Inge Morath: An Illustrated Biography...

Beyond the Myth of the War Photographer


The New York Times LENS


The myth of the war photographer is hard to dispel. Infused with machismo, the Hollywood archetype is the hard-living, scarf-wearing loner dashing from one war zone to the next, with romantic partners as expendable as bullets. But clichés ignore the doubts, fears and moral quandaries as well as the loneliness and pain that shadow those who document the depths of human depravity. Such emotional whiplash creates that other cliché — of the tragic, fallen heroes (or heroines) broken by the horrors they’ve witnessed.

The reality of the war photographer is, of course, far more nuanced...

A New Photographic Place Has Just Opened in Paris: La Comète!


The Eye of Photography

La Comète, Books & Photography is a library-gallery opened by PICTO lab.

Like a tribute to his grandfather Pierre Gassmann, mythical figure of French photography in the second half of the 20th century, Philippe Gassmann, current CEO of the PICTO group, chose to call this new venue La Comète, in memory of the first PICTO lab in La Comète street in Paris in the early 1950s.

La Comète is at 29 rue des Récollets in the 10th arrondissement of Paris. For PICTO it is a question of creating a kind of agora where professionals and amateurs will find different services to their needs … Thus, on the first floor of the bookstore is a new fine art photo workshop, where photographers and amateurs can find two forms of services: access to high definition and self-service quality scanners, and assisted inkjet printing with the lab’s expert board.

The artistic direction of La Comète is carried out by The Eyes, in the continuity of its expertise in the field of photo editing. It is a question of stimulating programming of installations, meetings, and workshops in the service of photographers and passionate about images.

Brassaï

SFMOMA
San Francisco, CA
17 November 2018 - 17 February 2019

 

Best known for his provocative and enigmatic images of Parisian life between the two world wars, the photographer Brassaï (born Gyula Halász) is one of the most prominent figures of twentieth-century photography. Called “the eye of Paris” by his friend Henry Miller, Brassaï’s work both celebrates and reveals the complexities and hidden sides of French society and culture.

This thematic survey of his career focuses on his celebrated depictions of 1930s Paris, where he photographed lovers, prostitutes, workers, and gatherings in cafés, bars, and dance halls with an intimate candor that’s still striking today. The exhibition also includes powerful portraits of his artist friends—Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dalí, and Henri Matisse, among others—and the city’s creative avant-garde. Brassaï brings together outstanding prints of the artist’s best work along with many never-before-seen photographs.

Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940–1950


The National Gallery of Art
Washington DC
4 November 2018 - 18 February 2019


 During the 1940s American photographer Gordon Parks (1912–2006) grew from a self-taught photographer making portraits and documenting everyday life in Saint Paul and Chicago to a visionary professional shooting for Ebony, Vogue, Fortune, and Life. For the first time, the formative decade of Parks’s 60-year career is the focus of an exhibition, which brings together 150 photographs and ephemera—including magazines, books, letters, and family pictures. The exhibition will illustrate how Parks’s early experiences at the Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information, and Standard Oil (New Jersey) as well as his close relationships with Roy Stryker, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and Ralph Ellison, helped shape his groundbreaking style. A fully illustrated catalog, with extensive new research and previously unpublished images, will accompany the exhibition.
 

Leonard Freed: Worldview


Jewish Museum of Belgium
Bruxelles, Belgium
18 October 2018 - 17 March 2019


Leonard Freed (1929-2006) is one of the most important reporters of the twentieth century. His photographs taken in the United States, Europe and the Middle East have made the front pages of many newspapers. Member of the famous Magnum agency, he is part of the great tradition of photographic reporting. Freed is one of the most famous representatives of concerned photography.

The retrospective, created by the Musée de l'Elysée in collaboration with Magnum Photos, Paris and the Fotomuseum in The Hague, traces the career of a man who lives by and for photography. In addressing the major events of the past fifty years - including the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the civil rights movement in the United States, post-war Germany and the Romanian revolution - Freed takes a penetrating and caring look at individuals inseparable from their environment. 

Nobuyoshi Araki: Integral Photo Lesson


The Eye of Photography

“Photograph with kindness, look with kindness, light with kindness”

For the first time, in these interviews where he comments one after the other 336 photographs covering his work from 1963 to 2010, the most famous contemporary Japanese photographer, Nobuyoshi Araki, tells his conception of his work and his many influences, from Eugène Atget to Yousuf Karsh or Robert Frank.

For Araki, “to live is to photograph”. In an approach that will pave the way for Nan Goldin and Sophie Calle, he claims the notion of photographic autofiction and documents his life often in its most intimate aspects such as his honeymoon or the untimely death of his wife.

For him  “documentary is a series of looks, followed by a discovery and an emotion” he reveals that “there is always an emotional connection” with his subject. “Taking photos is a face-to-face”.

Through a series of anecdotes mixing a lot of fun, a disarming frankness and an often poignant emotion, the artist remembers with remarkable precision the circumstances surrounding the taking of his photos. Inventor of the word “Erotos”, he says that the meeting of Eros and Thanatos has been his main focus all his life, since his children’s games in the prostitutes cemetery of Yoshiwara...


International Center of Photography
Caixa Forum Lleida
Lleida, Spain
27 September 2018 – 27 January 2019

 

This exhibition presents Robert Capa’'s color work for the first time. Capa regularly used color film from the 1940s until his death in 1954. Some of these photographs were published in magazines of the day, but the majority have never been printed, seen, or even studied. Over the years, this aspect of Capa’s career has virtually been forgotten. With over 100 contemporary color prints by the famous photojournalist, Capa in Color presents this work an integral part of his post-war career and fundamental in remaining relevant to magazines.

Capa in Color will explore how he started to see anew with color film and how his work adapted to a new postwar sensibility. The new medium required him to readjust to color compositions, but also to a postwar audience, interested in being entertained and transported to new places.

The exhibition is drawn entirely from the Robert Capa Archive in ICP’s permanent collection. The Archive contains roughly 4,200 color transparencies - 35mm Kodachrome, 21⁄4 Ektachrome, and some larger Kodachrome sheet film. It also includes thousands of vintage black-and-white prints, negatives, tearsheets, and papers.

Ansel Adams in Our Time


Museum of Fine Arts Boston
Boston, MA
13 December 2018 – 24 February 2019


Ansel Adams in Our Time traces the iconic visual legacy of Ansel Adams (1902–1984), presenting some of his most celebrated prints, from a symphonic view of snow-dusted peaks in The Tetons and Snake River, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming (1942) to an aerial shot of a knotted roadway in Freeway Interchange, Los Angeles (1967). The exhibition looks both backward and forward in time: his black-and-white photographs are displayed alongside prints by several of the 19th-century government survey photographers who greatly influenced Adams, as well as work by contemporary artists whose modern-day concerns centered on the environment, land rights, and the use and misuse of natural resources point directly to Adams’ legacy.

Adams’ stunning images were last on view at the MFA in a major exhibition in 2005; this new, even larger presentation places his work in the context of the 21st century, with all that implies about the role photography has played—and continues to play—in our changing perceptions of the land. The Adams photographs in the exhibition are drawn from the Lane Collection, one of the largest and most significant gifts in MFA history.

News from the World of Photography: November 2018

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Guns and poses: Deutsche Börse photography prize shortlist revealed


The Guardian

This year’s Deutsche Borse photography prize shortlist is a considered choice of four artists whose approaches draw on documentary, archival appropriation and conceptualism. They are: Susan Meiselas for her retrospective exhibition, Mediations; Laia Abril for her deeply-researched book, On Abortion; Arwed Messmer for his archival exhibition, RAF: No Evidence and Mark Ruwedel for his show, The Artist and Society.

This photographer wanted to humanize Ellis Island’s immigrants. His images are still powerful.


The Washington Post
 
To the new arrivals at Ellis Island in the early 1900s, the thin bespectacled man waving them down seemed to be a part of the immigration process.

They had spent weeks crossing the Atlantic Ocean in hopes of becoming Americans, and now that they had disembarked from the crowded ships, they hoped there were only a few steps remaining.

After being herded into an immense brick building, the crowds of newcomers were directed this way and that, told to sit, stand, open their luggage and, for a select few, found themselves cornered by Lewis Hine, a man toting a heavy, boxlike camera on a rickety tripod.

Usually, Hine did not speak their language. He motioned to them what he wanted to do. They waited anxiously while he set up the camera, and then the machine emitted a resounding bang. Sparks flew. Thick smoke filled the air. When it cleared, the immigrants were sent on to the next step — likely never knowing they had just become a part of one man’s project to make the country more welcoming toward them...

Roger Fenton's Photographs of the Crimea


The Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace
London, UK
Until 28 April 2019

 

This is the first exhibition to focus exclusively on Roger Fenton's pioneering photographs of the Crimean War, taken in 1855. Fenton was already an accomplished and respected photographer when he was sent by the publishers Agnew's to photograph a war that pitched Britain, France and Turkey as allies against Russia.  Arriving several months after the major battles were fought in 1854, Fenton focused on creating moving portraits of the troops, as well as capturing the stark, empty battlefields on which so many lost their lives. 

Published in contemporary newspaper reports, Fenton's photographs showed the impact of war to the general public for the first time.  Through his often subtle and poetic interpretations Fenton created the genre of war photography, showing his extraordinary genius in capturing the futility of war.

Time Travel Back to 1970s L.A. with These Vintage Photos


Los Angeles Magazine

 Thinking of ’70s L.A. now probably brings to mind the golden days of Laurel Canyon, antics on the Sunset Strip, or maybe a few New Age cults. But a new group show at Joseph Bellows Gallery peels away some of those layers of nostalgia to show images of how the region looked to photographers as they lived it.

Work in the show comes from photographers Bevan Davies, Philip Melnick, John Humble, Grant Mudford, Terry Wild, and Ave Pildas. The images selected from each artist capture small moments of how the city looked at the time. Some of the locations are still recognizable now, others have evolved more visibly in the ensuing decades...

 

Arbus, Untitled and Unearthly


The New York Times

Beginning in 1969 and continuing through the last two years of her life, Diane Arbus traveled regularly by bus to New Jersey to photograph people at residences for the developmentally and intellectually disabled. Her first destination, the coeducational Woodbridge State School, was just across the Hudson from her Manhattan apartment. Quite soon, though, she determined that an all-female institution in Vineland, in the southern part of the state, provided richer opportunities.

The photographs in the “Untitled” series, at the David Zwirner gallery through Dec. 15, are mostly taken in Vineland. Departing significantly from the work that built Arbus's reputation, they include some of the most mysterious and haunting pictures of her 15-year artistic career.

The “Untitled” exhibition is the first in Zwirner’s new partnership with the Fraenkel Gallery of San Francisco to co-represent the Arbus estate. Rather than start with her iconic portraits of sideshow freaks, cross-dressers, pro-Vietnam war demonstrators and nudists, the New York gallery opted to show this less familiar, late work, which until now has never been seen in its entirety...

V&A's impressive new Photography Centre opens with major commissions and month-long photography spotlight


Creative Boom

The world’s first photographic experiments and earliest cameras; works by pioneering female photographers, Julia Margaret Cameron, Agnes Warburg, Madame Yevonde and Cindy Sherman; pictures by 20th-century greats Alfred Stieglitz, Walker Evans, Berenice Abbott, Brassaï, Cecil Beaton and Irving Penn, and contemporary works by Martin Parr, Sian Bonnell, Mary McCartney, Peter Funch, Cornelia Parker and Hiroshi Sugimoto.

This is just some of what to expect at the V&A’s impressive new Photography Centre, which spans four new galleries, more than doubling the museum’s space dedicated to photography...


The New York Times

Quentin Bajac, the chief curator of photography at the Museum of Modern Art, will return to his native Paris to become director of the Jeu de Paume, France’s national photography museum.

Mr. Bajac has served as MoMA’s photography chief since January 2013, only the fifth person to hold the post since its creation in 1940. In New York, he organized a large retrospective of the American photographer Stephen Shore, as well as a century-spanning history of studio photography and an edition of MoMA’s “New Photography” series. He also was co-curator of an acclaimed revisionist presentation of MoMA’s permanent collection at the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris in 2017.

Before coming to MoMA, Mr. Bajac served as a photography curator at the Musée d’Orsay in Paris, then as chief curator of photography at the Centre Georges Pompidou.

Louis Stettner: Traveling Light


SF MOMA
San Francisco, CA
27 October 2018 - 27 May 2019 


Over the course of his eight-decade career, Louis Stettner created a singular approach to photographing everyday life. Born in Brooklyn in 1922, Stettner began working as a photographer in the 1930s and served in the U.S. Army in World War II before moving to Paris in 1947. There, he studied at the Institut des Hautes Études Cinématographiques, became friends with the influential photographer Brassaï (whose work will be on view on Floor 3 from November 17, 2018–February 18, 2019), and developed a unique point of view that melded the boldness of American street photography with the softer humanism more characteristic of his Paris contemporaries. For the rest of his life, he traveled between New York and Paris — his “two loves,” as he called them — constantly finding new inspiration in that geographical duality. From thoughtful images of rush-hour commuters to tranquil observations of daily routines, this thematic retrospective displays the remarkable breadth of Stettner’s work.

A New Home for the Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson in Paris


The New York Times

Henri Cartier-Bresson was a photojournalism pioneer, a man whose wartime images of Europe and portraits of personalities like Albert Camus and Samuel Beckett have become 20th-century classics.

Yet he never allowed himself to be photographed, and he never appeared on television.

“It meant that his face wasn’t widely
recognizable, and that he could blend in everywhere he went, without people knowing it was him,” said Agnès Sire, artistic director of the Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson in Paris, which was established in 2003.

One of his only known self-portraits, taken on a trip to Siena, Italy, is a view of his extended right leg, in trousers, with a winding road in the background. The so-called self-portrait was taken “as he was lying on a wall,” Ms. Sire said.

“The subject is completely banal: That’s what’s interesting about it,” she continued. “It’s a private moment — not a moment where you’re posing for a double-page spread in Paris Match magazine.”

The Siena picture is one of about 50,000 original prints that have moved from Montparnasse, on the Left Bank of Paris, to the foundation’s new and bigger home on the Right Bank, in the fashionable Marais district. More than 200,000 negatives and contact sheets have also been relocated...

Contact Warhol: Photography Without End


Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University
Stanford, CA
29 September 2018 - 6 January 2019

 

Photographs by Andy Warhol that have never before been displayed publicly are at the heart of the exhibition Contact Warhol: Photography Without End, which draws on a trove of over 130,000 photographic exposures that the Cantor Arts Center acquired from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts in 2014. The collection of 3,600 contact sheets and corresponding negatives represent the complete range of Warhol’s black-and-white photographic practice from 1976 until his unexpected death in 1987.

The exhibition brings to life Warhol’s many interactions with the social and celebrity elite of his time with portraits of stars such as Michael Jackson, Liza Minnelli, and Dolly Parton; younger sensations in the art world such as Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat; and political stars, including Nancy Reagan, Maria Shriver, and Arnold Schwarzenegger. Contact Warhol, curated by Stanford Professors Richard Meyer and Peggy Phelan, traces Warhol’s photography from the most fundamental level of the contact sheet to the most fully developed silkscreen paintings. 

Terror in focus: the Jewish photographer who captured the rise of Nazism


The Guardian

In 1920, Roman Vishniac and his new bride Luta arrived in Berlin. Having fled the turmoil of post-revolutionary Moscow, the couple had hastily been married by a station master in a Latvian border town, before traveling to Riga and on to the German capital. There, Vishniac was reunited with his wealthy parents, who had left Russia three years earlier, and he and Luta were married again in a register office before their union was blessed by a traditional Jewish ceremony. So began their new life in a city that an excited Vishniac described as “a living whole … the centre of western Europe”.

The story of their flight is emblematic of Vishniac’s extraordinary life, which was lived out, in part, against Europe’s turbulent early-to-mid 20th-century history. As a child he had experimented with scientific photography, attaching a microscope to a camera in order to produce magnified images of insects and plants. Having gone on to train as a biologist, he found work hard to come by in Berlin. Intrigued by the cosmopolitan nature of the city, he became a keen amateur photographer, strolling the city night and day with a Rolleiflex camera dangling from his neck...

A National Gallery show examines Gordon Parks’s early years


The Washington Post 


He was the youngest of his father’s 15 children. He wrote in his high school yearbook that he wanted to be “a general or a Jazz Sheik.”

Gordon Parks fell short of those goals, but in the process of failing, he became a poet, novelist and memoirist; the inventor of a new genre of film; a pianist, composer and librettist; and one of the greatest photographers of the 20th century. How did this happen?

If you love an artist’s mature work, his or her early work is almost always riveting. The drama is innate: How did it come to be? What were the breakthroughs? Who and what helped? What explains it?

“Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940-1950,” at the National Gallery of Art, sets out to answer these questions. But just as Parks himself got diverted on his way to becoming a “Jazz Sheik,” the curator, Philip Brookman, gets waylaid, and instead of rooting around in juvenilia, finds himself presenting a show with the force and cogency of a full-blown retrospective...


The New York Times Magazine

Robert Adams’s succinct preface to his 2010 book of photographs “What Can We Believe Where?” begins with uplift: “In common with many photographers,” he writes, “I began making pictures because I wanted to record what supports hope: the untranslatable mystery and beauty of the world.” Adams’s aim was true. Look at one of his photographs and you’ll see a record of mystery and beauty. The photographic elements are simple. Bright sunlight, generally; crisp shadow; the occasional moody nocturne. We feel as if we are being taught to see with a visual primer. Better yet, turn the pages of one of his books (he has made more than 50) or walk around an exhibition of his work, inhabiting the flow of his decisions. You are likely to feel your breath getting calmer and your senses quietened...

The Eye of Photography
 
“In the heart of the Sudan, and to the west of the White Nile, there is a strange and unreal land which the hand of time has hardly touched in passing.” – George Rodger

From 1939-47 Magnum photographer George Rodger covered some of the most violent atrocities of the second world war: from the brutality of the Burma campaign to horrific piles of corpses at the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp.

In 1948, in search of something less barbaric, Rodger arranged to document indigenous people of the Nuba mountains, in the former central Sudanese province of Kordofan, and the Latuka and other tribes of southern Sudan. In doing so, he created some of the most historically important and influential images taken in sub-Saharan Africa during the twentieth century.

Southern Sudan is released to coincide with an exhibition of the same name at David Hill Gallery, London, opening on 2nd November until 25th January.

‘George Rodger belongs to the great tradition of explorers and adventurers. His work is a moving testimony through time and space.’ Henri Cartier-Bresson

Hyperallergic

Time may just be an illusion, yet humans have the need to mark time in order to make sense of our lives. In "Time Frames: Contemporary East Asian Photography" at the Baltimore Museum of Art, works by contemporary East Asian photographers explore time through both subject matter and creative processes, as the artists grapple with their cultural and personal histories.

The exhibition highlights around 40 photographic works by Asian American artists and artists from Vietnam, Korea, Japan, and China that are rarely seen in the US. The photographs represent five ways that the featured artists have engaged with the concept of time: through individual and collective experience, reflection, duration and labor, progress and place, and displacement...

The British Journal of Photography

So far the wildfires in California have claimed the lives of 94 people and laid waste to 1,667,855 acres of land this year. And, according to Dutch paper NRC Handelsblad, they’ve also consumed a world-renown library of photobooks, put together over the last six years by Dutch collector Manfred Heiting.

Based at Cutberth Road, Malibu, Heiting’s collection included vintage photographs, posters, ceramics and art deco furniture – and at least 36,000 photobooks. Residents in this area were told to evacuate a week ago, and the coastal town is now “a war zone”, Heiting told NRC Handelsblad. At the time of the report on 20 November, Heiting has not yet been given the green light to visit his house but he stated that: “On satellite photos I can see that everything in my neighborhood has disappeared. Two or three houses may have survived. The rest was pulverized in a ten-minute fire storm.”

Once a director of Polaroid’s international division, Heiting started collecting photography in the 1970s, when he focused on gathering prints. In 2002 he sold this collection to the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, and started to focus on photobooks. His collection was considered one of the most complete in the world, including a copy of most of the important photobooks that appeared from 1888-1970 in Europe, the United States, the Soviet Union, and Japan.

Heiting’s expertise and collection were used in a series of compendiums published recently by Steidl – including The Soviet Photobook 1920-1941, The Japanese Photobook 1912-1980, and Czech and Slovak Photo Publications 1918-1998. He also worked on a website to make his archive more widely accessible, and used it in his lectures at the University of California.

According to NRC Handelsblad, the loss of Heiting’s collection is not just his loss, because he had recently donated his library to the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston. A few thousand books had already been transferred, but the rest was to stay with Heiting until 2023, for use in his research and publications. “The responsible curators were still visiting me at the beginning of October to make a definitive choice,” Heiting reportedly said. “It is terribly disappointing. For us all.”

“It is not easy now to put this loss away,” he adds. “But I have to close it soon. The collection will not come back.”

News from the World of Photography: October 2018

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Japan Modern: Photography from the
Gloria Katz and Willard Huyck Collection


Freer|Sackler Galleries of Asian Art
The Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC
29 September 2018 – 24 January 2019

 

Celebrating the Freer|Sackler’s recent acquisition of a major Japanese photography collection, this exhibition features a selection of works by groundbreaking twentieth-century photographers. Whether capturing evocative landscapes or the gritty realities of postwar Japan, this presentation focuses on Japanese artists’ search for a sense of place in a rapidly changing country. The images highlight destinations both rural and urban, in styles ranging from powerful social documentary to intensely personal. A selection of photobooks and experimental films adds to this multifaceted exploration.

How Gordon Parks Became Gordon Parks


The New York Times LENS Blog
 
At the beginning of the 1940s, Gordon Parks was a self-taught fashion and portrait photographer documenting daily life in both St. Paul and Chicago. By the end of the decade he was photographing for Life magazine. While his career has been examined closely, both in his own words and by others, this formative decade has attracted less attention than his experiences as the first black staff photographer at Life, and later as a groundbreaking Hollywood filmmaker.

A new book, “Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940-1950,” published by the National Gallery of Art, The Gordon Parks Foundation and Steidl, examines this transformation...

This is Cas | Vintage photography by Cas Oorthuys


Nederlands Fotomuseum
Rotterdam, Netherlands
15 September 2018 - 13 January 2019

 

Cas Oorthuys (1908-1975) spent his entire life, practically without interruption, taking pictures - and lots of them. He never left home without a camera - usually with two or three and sometimes more of them around his neck. By the time he died, he had accumulated an archive of almost half a million photographs. Like the 17th-century landscape painters who determined the look of the Netherlands for centuries afterward, Cas Oorthuys did this with photography: with wind, water, imposing cloud formations, and an open uncluttered landscape.

Cas Oorthuys did not shy away from anything. Risking his own life, he continued secretly taking pictures during the Second World War. His portrait of a starving woman with a piece of bread became an icon of the Dutch famine winter of 1944/1945. Afterward, his camera recorded Dutch post-war reconstruction in which he so perfectly captured the atmosphere of optimism and hard work. Light, air, and space returned to the Netherlands as reflected in his photography. He also spent this period traveling all over the world. For many people in the Netherlands, his photographs were their first introduction to cities in other countries.

Dorothea Lange: Politics of Seeing

Jeu de Paume
Concorde, Paris
16 October 2018 - 27 January 2019


 The Politics of Seeing features major works by the world-famous American photographer Dorothea Lange (1895, Hoboken, New Jersey–1966, San Francisco, California), some of which have never before been exhibited in France. The exhibition focuses on the extraordinary emotional power of Dorothea Lange’s work and on the context of her documentary practice. It features five specific series: the Depression period (1933-1934), a selection of works from the Farm Security Administration (1935-1939), the Japanese American internment (1942), the Richmond shipyards (1942-1944) and a series on a Public defender (1955-1957). Over one hundred splendid vintage prints taken between 1933 and 1957 are enhanced by the presence of documents and screenings broadening the scope of an œuvre often familiar to the public through images such as White Angel Breadline (1933) and Migrant Mother (1936), which are icons of photographic history. The majority of prints in this exhibition belong to the Oakland Museum of California, where Lange’s considerable archive, donated to the museum after her death by her husband Paul Shuster Taylor, is conserved.
 

Belgian Photographer Bieke Depoorter Receives the 2019 Larry Sultan Award


Pier 24 Photography

In a collaborative partnership with four major Bay Area arts organizations, Bieke Depoorter has been selected to receive the prestigious 2018 Larry Sultan Photography Award. The award, granted through a partnership of California College of the Arts, Headlands Center for the Arts, Pier 24 Photography, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, consists of a $10,000 cash award and an artist residency at Headlands Center for the Arts in Sausalito, CA. As the 2018 awardee, Depoorter will engage with the Bay Area photography community by working with students at the California College of the Arts this fall and giving a free, public lecture on November 8, 2018.

Photographer Bieke Depoorter (b. 1986, Belgium) travels the world to find her subjects, creating extraordinarily intimate photographs that straddle portraiture, documentary, and fiction. The relationships she creates with those she photographs are the key to her work. As Depoorter describes it, “The relationships I establish with my subjects are the foundation of my artistic practice…The resulting stories are always partially mine, partially theirs.”

Ara Guler, Poetic Photographer of Istanbul, Dies at 90


The New York Times

Ara Guler, a Turkish photographer who was best known for capturing poignant and nostalgic images of a bygone Istanbul but who also portrayed famous figures and everyday life in far-flung lands, died on Wednesday in the city he so lovingly chronicled. He was 90.

His death was announced by Magnum Photos, his agency, in a statement on its website.

Mr. Guler’s pictures reflected the shadows and sparkle of Istanbul, a city he once described in an interview as a sort of “Madwoman of Chaillot” who had grown old but never neglectful of how she looked: Touch her, he said, “and a jewel will appear.”...


British Journal of Photography

Eugene Richard’s first New York retrospective chronicles 50 years of the respected photographer’s work, covering the crumbling effects of poverty, racism, drug addiction, and death in rural America.

“You’re always looking for that time where everybody forgets you’re there and becomes themselves. Surprisingly they do, sometimes to the detriment of what you knew about them,” says Eugene Richards, who has devoted his career to documenting social injustice in America, and to injecting himself into intensely personal situations.

Richards’ style is up-close and unflinching, “ironically it’s the process of becoming as not there as you possibly can, if you hang around long enough people don’t care”. Though his photography has been described as poetic and lyrical, he has never thought of himself as an artist. “I went in with some knowledge of photography, but mostly with the idea of providing information,” he says...

Eugene Richards: The Run-on of Time


International Center of Photography
ICP Museum, New York, NY
27 September 2018 - 6 January 2019 


One of the most respected photographers of his generation, Eugene Richards has devoted his career to exploring profound aspects of human experience. Birth, death, family, and the grinding effects of poverty and prejudice, as well as the mental and physical health of individuals and communities, are recurring themes of his work. This exhibition—organized thematically, rather than by project—reveals Richards’s enduring concern with these subjects over the course of his nearly fifty-year career.

Richards’s style is unflinching yet poetic, and his photographs are deeply rooted in the texture of lived experience. Through photographs, writings, and moving-image works, Richards confronts difficult subjects with an impassioned honesty that can be challenging, lyrical, beautiful, and melancholy.

His work is informed by the subjective approach of Robert Frank and the social commitment of W. Eugene Smith. It is distinct from these precedents, however, in that it is more intimate and does not disguise its emotional investment. Richards is, in his own words, “very conscious of what it means to go into someone’s house and take very private moments away in pictures. The responsibility of the photographer is to respect people while—and this is most important—utilizing all your skills to reveal something true about their lives and their humanity.” This way of working results in photographs that can be seen as  more honest and more realistic than traditional documentary imagery.

Ultimately, Richards illuminates aspects of American society that are more easily, or more comfortably, ignored. Yet the tender inflection of his strong, unique voice makes encountering his work an unforgettable and rewarding experience.

Blue Prints: The Pioneering Photographs of Anna Atkins


New York Public Library
New York, NY
Until 17 February 2019


Anna Atkins (1799–1871) came of age in Victorian England, a fertile environment for learning and discovery. Guided by her father, a prominent scientist, Atkins was inspired to take up photography, and in 1843 began making cyanotypes—a photographic process invented just the year before—in an effort to visualize and distribute information about her collection of seaweeds. With great daring, creativity, and technical skill, she produced Photographs of British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions, the first book to be illustrated with photographs, and the first substantial application of photography to science. Ethereal, deeply hued, and astonishingly detailed, the resulting images led her and her friend Anne Dixon to expand their visual inquiry to flowering plants, feathers, and other subjects. This exhibition draws upon more than a decade of careful research and sets Atkins and her much-admired work in context, shedding new light on her productions and showcasing the distinctive beauty of the cyanotype process, which is still used by artists today.

Madame d'Ora, Pioneering Photographer of 20th Century Greats


Pro Photo Daily

Gustave Klimt wanted her to photograph him. So did Pablo Picasso and Marc Chagall. Josephine Baker and Maurice Chevalier turned to her, as did Emperor Charles I of Austria and Coco Chanel.

Dora Kallmus – known professionally as Madame d’Ora – was Austria’s first female photographer, and her client list was a who’s who of preeminent 20th-century artists and intellectuals, along with glittering names of Viennese society and Parisian fashion.

Kallmus, who died in 1963 in Vienna, left a body of work that, noted the AnOther blog recently, was a “varied and joyful testament to a life stretching across the 20th century’s seminal events; one lived beyond the strictures of society and alongside many of its most interesting characters.”

That work is now being celebrated in the exhibition “Make Me Look Beautiful, Madame d’Ora,” which runs through October 29 at the Leopold Museum in Vienna.

Larry Fink: The Boxing Photographs


Philadelphia Museum of Art
Philadelphia, PA
11 August 2018 - 1 January 2019

Larry Fink’s powerful, unsentimental photographs reveal the heart of close-knit communities. Here, he takes us inside what he calls “the deep fraternity” of the boxing gym, its intimacy and its grit, captured in more than seventy-five luminous gelatin-silver prints. Featured in the series are Philadelphia’s own Blue Horizon—one of the great American boxing arenas—and the local fighters who’ve had their dreams realized, or dashed, within its hallowed walls.

The Many Hats of Ralph Arnold: Art, Identity & Politics


Museum of Contemporary Photography (MoCP)
Columbia College, Chicago, IL
11 October - 21 December 2018 

 

During the tumultuous 1960s and 70s, the prolific artist Ralph Arnold made photocollages that appropriated and commented upon mass media portrayals of gender, sexuality, race and politics. Arnold’s complex visual arrangements of photography, painting and text were built upon his own multilayered identity as a black, gay veteran and prominent member of Chicago’s art community, hence the title for the exhibition, which is drawn from one of the artist’s more personal pieces. Arnold participated in some of the era’s most provocative exhibitions yet by the mid-1980s he increasingly focused on his teaching and service to the art community. This exhibition brings together Arnold’s most significant contributions to the art of collage, including a recently rediscovered triptych made for the 1968 MCA Chicago exhibition, Violence in Recent American Art. It also includes work by contemporaries and colleagues like Robert Rauschenberg, Ed Paschke, and Barbara Jones-Hogu to add further context and enrich our understanding of Arnold’s legacy.


Crocker Art Museum
Sacramento, CA
16 September 2018 - 6 January 2019


Duane Michals: The Portraitist presents the first comprehensive overview of inventive portraits by this influential photographer who, in the 1960s, broke away from established traditions of documentary and fine-art photography and is still creating original work today. Michals is widely recognized for his eye-catching portraits of actors, artists, musicians, writers, and other public figures. Striving to articulate his own distinct style and vision while distinguishing each subject’s individual personality, the artist empowers his sitters to express themselves in their own environments and through improvisation. He is perhaps best known for the sequences he assembles to convey personal visual narratives, often with handwritten messages and poems added to the photographic print surface. The exhibition spans nearly six decades, featuring more than 125 portraits collectively highlighting the artist’s expansive toolkit — sequenced images, multiple exposures, reflections, uncommon vantage points, collage, hand-painting, and other techniques.

Telfair Museums
Savannah, GA
17 August 2018 - 13 January 2019 


The Language of Vision: Early Twentieth-Century Photography thematically links four photographers from Telfair Museums’ permanent collection who made significant advances in the medium of photography before 1945: Ralph Steiner (American, 1899–1986), Manuel Álvarez Bravo (Mexican, 1902–2002), Walker Evans (American, 1903–1975), and Helen Levitt (American, 1913–2009).

At the turn of the 20th century, most photography was overly-romanticized, staged, or fulfilled a strictly documentary function. Connected historically and socially, the four artists in this exhibition instead employed straight photography, engaging with the camera’s technical capacity to capture what was in front of them without heavy manipulation in the darkroom.

As cameras became more portable during their lifetimes, these photographers literally took to the streets to document modern life on film. While objectively depicting the people and places of their day, they also created images born of their own artistic insight, distinguished by subject matter, cropping, vantage point, lighting, and the types of cameras they used.

Although these artists photographed during much of the 20th century, their work from the 1920s through ’40s elevated the status of photography as a whole. All four demonstrated that while mechanically made, their photographs reflected the subtle expressiveness of the individual, a pivotal development in the genre of photography as a distinct visual art form.

Their ability to capture the contemporary moment created timeless images that still reveal insights about the human condition today.

The Eye of Photography

The people in these photographs are from some of the 34 indigenous communities in the remotest parts of the world that Jimmy Nelson worked to make his second book about the strength and beauty of these cultures, Jimmy Nelson: Homage to Humanity.

The exhibition of the same name opens today (Wednesday, 19 Sept) at Atlas Gallery, in London W1. In both the exhibition and the book, the British-born photographer pays tribute to the thirty-four communities he encountered while traveling across five continents, from the Sharchop in the Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan to the Mundari in South Sudan.

His first book about indigenous peoples, Before They Pass Away (2013), was a bestseller and helped spark a global debate. Jimmy Nelson: Homage to Humanity, extends both the artist’s practice but also pushes the limits of technology, as he introduces readers to his subjects, through interviews, background material and then, via a mobile app triggered by the photographs in the book, behind-the-scenes 360 films shot on location...

Arch Daily

The shortlist for the 2018 Architectural Photography Awards have been revealed, bringing together 20 atmospheric images of the built environment. Categories this year ranged from a “portfolio of an individual building to a single abstract: with a professional camera or on a mobile phone.”

The 2018 edition saw a record number of entries, with photographs from 47 countries, including the UK (28%), USA (20%), Germany (6%), and China (5%). The 20 photographs were selected from four categories: exteriors, interiors, sense of place, and buildings in use.

The images will be exhibited at the World Architecture Festival in Amsterdam from 28th-30th November, where visitors can cast their vote for the winner, to be announced at the WAF Gala Dinner.

Public voting for the Mobile category is open until Friday 30th November. The awards are supported by the World Architecture Festival and PICSEL, and sponsored by Sto and Dornbracht.

The Boston Globe

The Museum of Fine Arts announced Thursday a major addition to its photographic holdings: the Howard Greenberg Collection. Greenberg is a longtime New York gallery owner. The acquisition, which was purchased for an undisclosed sum, comprises 447 photographs from 191 artists. Among them are 80 previously unrepresented at the MFA, including Jacob Riis, Frances Benjamin Johnston, and Inge Morath. Overall, the photographers are a who’s who of the medium: André Kertész, Walker Evans, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Lewis Hine, Dorothea Lange, Robert Frank, and Diane Arbus, among them.

“This acquistion is going to be truly transformational for us,” Anne Havinga said in a telephone interview. Havinga is the museum’s Estrellita and Yousuf Karsh chair, department of photography. “There are so many important photographs in this collection — and really extraordinary prints of the photographs.”

The MFA has some 15,000 photographs in its holdings, so the new acquisition increases that number by nearly 3 percent. An exhibition drawn from the Greenberg Collection is scheduled to open at the MFA in August. MARK FEENEY


New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA)
New Orleans, LA
7 September 2018 - 6 January 2019


NOMA celebrates its century-long relationship to photography with Past Present Future: Building Photography at the New Orleans Museum of Art. This three-part presentation will include first, a partial recreation of a groundbreaking 1918 show at the Delgado Museum of Art (later renamed the New Orleans Museum of Arrt), presenting vintage prints of photographs that were included in the original exhibition. The second component of the exhibition presents an impressive group of works acquired within the past seven years that demonstrate the museum’s commitment to expanding its representation of diverse cultural perspectives from around the globe. The final section will consist of works that have been promised to the institution, signaling how the collection will continue to grow into the future. Past Present Future, along with the recent release of a new book about the collection, Looking Again: Photography at the New Orleans Museum of Art, mark this important moment in the institution’s long relationship with photography, looking at its past with an eye towards its future.

The Wittliff Collections
Texas State University, San Marcos, TX
August 27 - December 18, 2018


Dubbed a “poet of the ordinary” by the Los Angeles Times, Keith Carter came of age during the turbulent sixties and seventies. From his experiences, he has developed a singular, haunting style that captures both the grit and the glory of the human spirit. Showcasing a broad array of his work, Keith Carter: Fifty Years spans delicate, century-old processes as well as digital-age techniques yielding an enduring vision of the world around us. These photographs use contrasts of natural light and darkness to explore the mythos of time and terrain, the familiar, the magical, and the varied creatures that inhabit our earth. The human form—depleted or energized, solitary or with a beloved partner— becomes a meditation on aging and loss, which have affected Carter profoundly in recent years. Yet these losses have spurred in him a sense of discovery, not despair.

Carter is an internationally recognized artist and educator who holds the endowed Walles Chair of Art at Lamar University. He has received the Texas Medal of Arts, the Lange-Taylor Prize from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, and the Regent’s Professor Award from the Texas State University System. His photography has been shown in more than 100 solo exhibitions in thirteen countries.

This exhibition, featuring well over 100 images taken from every phase of Carter’s career, was organized by The Wittliff Collections, which hold the major archive of Keith Carter’s photography.

Nevada Museum of Art
Reno, NV
September 29, 2018 - January 27, 2019 


This major retrospective exhibition rediscovers and celebrates the work of Anne Brigman (1869-1950), who is best known for her iconic landscape photographs made in the early 1900s depicting herself and other female nudes outdoors in the Sierra Nevada. Brigman’s photography was considered radical for its time. To objectify her own nude body as the subject of her photographs at the turn of the twentieth century was groundbreaking; to do so outdoors in a near-desolate wilderness setting was revolutionary. Although the term feminist art was not coined until nearly seventy years after Brigman made her first photographs, the suggestion that her camera gave her the power to redefine her place as a woman in society establishes her as an important forerunner in the field.

Brigman’s significance spanned both coasts: in Northern California, where she lived, she was known as a poet, a critic, a proponent of the Arts & Crafts philosophy, and a member of the Pictorialist photography movement. On the East Coast, her work was promoted by Alfred Stieglitz, who elected her as a fellow of the prestigious Photo-Secession. From 1903 to 1944 Anne Brigman maintained ongoing correspondence with Alfred Stieglitz, exchanging nearly 100 letters during this time. Brigman is also noted for her honest art criticism and opinioned voice on cultural and fine art topics, and as a published poet.

Museum Ludwig
Cologne, Germany
Au­gust 31, 2018 – Jan­uary 6, 2019


Diane Ar­bus, Boris Beck­er, Karl Bloss­feldt, Walk­er Evans, Lee Fried­lan­der, Can­di­da Höfer, Gabriele and Hel­mut Noth­helfer, Ta­ta Ronkholz, Al­bert Renger-Patzsch, Au­gust San­der, Hu­go and Karl Hu­go Sch­mölz, Gar­ry Wino­grand, Pi­et Zwart—across gen­er­a­tions, all th­ese pho­to­g­ra­phers cont­in­u­al­ly fol­lowed themes over de­cades in their work. In the case of San­der, th­ese se­ries formed an at­las of Peo­ple of the Twen­ti­eth Cen­tu­ry, while Höfer has cre­at­ed an archive of public spaces and their codes of rep­re­sen­ta­tion, and Bloss­feldt ca­t­a­logued the for­mal va­ri­e­ty of fau­na and flo­ra. “S­traight pho­tog­ra­phy” brought to­gether the vary­ing re­cep­tion of pho­tog­ra­phy as artis­tic and doc­u­men­tary in a par­tic­u­lar way.

This sur­vey ex­hi­bi­tion pre­sents the mu­tu­al in­flu­ence be­tween Ger­man and Amer­i­can po­si­tions in the dense cul­tu­r­al land­s­cape of the Rhine­land from the 1960s to the 1990s. This is where the first pho­tog­ra­phy gal­leries were lo­cat­ed in the 1970s, which were en­thu­si­as­tic sup­port­ers of Au­gust San­der, Flo­rence Hen­ri, Pi­et Zwart, and Karl Bloss­feldt, as well as Amer­i­can pho­to­g­ra­phers in the 1960s such as Walk­er Evans, Diane Ar­bus, Lee Fried­lan­der, and Gar­ry Wino­grand, and pop­u­larized them by cont­in­u­al­ly en­gag­ing with the public. At the same time, Bernd and Hil­la Bech­er were high­ly in­flu­en­tial through their teach­ing at the Kun­s­takademie Düs­sel­dorf. And, not least, im­por­tant so­lo and group ex­hi­bi­tions had a last­ing im­pact on the re­cep­tion. In the 1950s, L. Fritz Gru­ber showed Au­gust San­der in the Pho­tok­i­na pho­tog­ra­phy shows. In 1976 the Kun­sthalle Düs­sel­dorf ex­hibit­ed pho­to­graphs by Walk­er Evans, and around the same time Klaus Hon­nef cu­rat­ed im­por­tant group ex­hi­bi­tions of doc­u­men­tary pho­tog­ra­phy at the Rheinisch­es Lan­des­mu­se­um in Bonn.

News from the World of Photography: September 2018

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Henry Wessel, Whose Lens Captured Life in the West, Is Dead at 76


The New York Times

Henry Wessel Jr., a distinguished photographer of the American West who captured not so much its vast grandeur as its small moments of daily life — the roadside novelty, the trimmed shrubbery, the man in a business suit on an empty beach — died on Friday at his home in Point Richmond, Calif. He was 76.

The cause was pulmonary fibrosis, Calvert Barron, his partner of 38 years, said. Mr. Wessel had been undergoing treatment for lung cancer, she said.

Mr. Wessel, whose work resides alongside that of the most admired artists of his generation, worked in a classic documentary tradition for nearly 50 years, photographing the world as he happened upon it....

How Garry Winogrand Transformed Street Photography


The New Yorker
 
A new documentary, “All Things Are Photographable,” traces how the legendarily prolific photographer pulled his art form into modernity...

EyeEm Announces this Year’s 100 Award Finalists


British Journal of Photography


EyeEm have announced the 100 finalist photographers in this year’s award, which saw a staggering 700,000 entries

EyeEm is currently the world’s largest photography competition, and this year it welcomed a record 700,000 entries. The submissions came from more than 100,000 photographers, hailing from over 150 countries, who have now been whittled down to 100 finalists.

The daunting task of selecting the finalists from this number came down to a panel of industry experts that included Nik Schulte, Image Director of High Snobiety; Jose Cabaco, the Global Creative Concept & Storytelling Director at Adidas; Lucy Pike, Director of Photography at WeTransfer; and Sasha Dudkina, last year’s EyeEm Photographer of the Year, among others. Together, they selected the top 10 images from each of the nine categories, and the 10 shortlisted photographers for Photographer of the Year.

The Anxious Hopeful Faces of Young People in Shenzhen, China


The New Yorker

 In Chinese, the name of Shenzhen, the sprawling, coastal megatropolis famed for its affluence and factories, means “deep drains.” A generation ago, Shenzhen was an impoverished fishing village of thirty thousand and relied on these drains, which flowed from surrounding rivers and streams, to feed its paddy fields. Today, the city teems with twenty million inhabitants, a symbol of both miraculous transformation and the excesses of vertiginous development.

In October of last year, the photographer Christopher Anderson received an open commission from Shenzhen’s Daken Art Organization to document life in China. For three weeks, he walked streets that “seemed to have been built overnight,” snapping the photos that are collected in “Approximate Joy,” his book due out in September. (An exhibition at Danziger Gallery, in New York, opens September 13th.) Instead of panoramas of glittering skylines and cloud-piercing towers, though, Anderson chose to tell the story of Shenzhen through the study of faces. Many of his photos are tightly cropped, decontextualized portraits that feel at once unnervingly intimate and otherworldly...

 

On View: Exploring the "NeoRealismo" Life of Mid-Century Italy


ProPhotoDaily

New York is getting real this month. Or rather, it’s getting “NeoRealismo.”

Beginning on Sept. 6 and running through Dec. 8 at New York University’s Grey Art Gallery is “NeoRealismo: The New Image in Italy, 1932-1960,” the first major museum exhibition to spotlight key Italian photographers recording life during the era. The exhibition, curated by critic and journalist Enrica Viganò, pairs work from 60 Italian artists with the original publications in which their images circulated, from illustrated magazines and photography books to exhibition catalogs.

Also on view will be excerpts from important films from post-war neorealism directors Vittorio De Sica, Roberto Rossellini and Luchino Visconti, alongside related movie posters.

On Sept. 12 New York’s Howard Greenberg Gallery will open an exhibition featuring Italian photography from the era, while the Museum of Modern Art will begin featuring post-war Italian photography from its own collection.

The Social Consciousness of Sid Grossman, a Photographer of the People

Hyperallergic

There’s an iconic photograph of folk singer Woody Guthrie, his skin weathered with sun, cigarette at his lips, the line of his guitar strap on a clean diagonal, as if triangulating man, instrument, and negative space. It was shot by Sid Grossman, of New York’s radical Photo League, in 1948, the year the collective was blacklisted during the Red Scare and declared a subversive organization, both for its documentation of the city’s impoverished communities and its Communist affiliations. (Guthrie, for his part, was long associated with various communist groups — without becoming an official member himself.)

This photo is not part of Sid Grossman: Photography, Politics, and the Ethical Image, an exhibition dedicated to the photographer’s life and work from the late 1930s and mid-1940s, now on view at the Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM).


lensculture

In the best tradition of great artists, John Chiara creates art that makes the old and familiar seem fresh, new and alive with possibilities and wonder. For his latest series of one-of-a-kind mural-size photographs of New York City, he designed and hand-built a giant camera that barely fits in the bed of a large rental pickup truck. Always looking up toward the skyline, he scouts through the city for the right combination of iconic architecture, perfect light and shadows, and surprising bits of pleasing chaos in the foreground...

Four to Follow #10

Witness

Sharing stories from across the African continent by the talented members of the African Photojournalism Database (APJD).

In this ‘Four to Follow’, meet the CaiRollers, Egypt’s own roller derby team; ask what it means to ‘move on’ for survivors of terrorism and violent conflict in Nigeria; find out about the women working for ‘semolina and gas’ in esparto fields in Tunisia; and glimpse daily life on the streets of the Republic of Congo.

While the issues, regions
and approaches of this month’s stories are incredibly diverse, a passion for visual storytelling links the four APJD members — Eman Helal, Nourredine Ahmed, Etinosa Yvonne and Victoire Douniama. Each began a career in a different field before deciding to pursue photography full time...

Picturing Mexico through the Eyes of Lola Alvarez Bravo


Feature Shoot

Lola Álvarez Bravo (1903-1993) was a singular figure in twentieth-century art, a woman whose independence defined the spirit of the era. “I had a strange need for something and I didn’t know what it was. I was in intense rebellion against certain things that they thought I should do because I was a ‘little woman’ and a ‘young lady,’” Álvarez Bravo told Olivier Debroise for Sin título [Biography of Lola Álvarez Bravo] in 1979.

“They thought I would respond to a predetermined social plan. But I felt a strange rebelliousness. I wanted to be something. . . . It was an internal rebellion.”

That something propelled her to tremendous heights, with a career that spans more than half a century as an artist, curator, activist, and educator. As one of the few leading women artists in Mexico during the post-revolutionary renaissance, Álvarez Bravo would become an integral figure in a coterie that included Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and David Alfaro Siqueiros...

Walter Bosshard / Robert Capa – The Race for China


The Eye of Photography


Walter Bosshard (1892–1975) was the first Swiss photojournalist to become internationally famous as a result of his reportages. As early as 1930, his photo reportages had already reached an audience of millions. Starting in 1931, Bosshard concentrated on China. As a photographer and writer, he followed the devastating war with Japan and the power struggle between nationalists and communists but also dedicated himself to everyday life and street scenes. As well as the classics, this exhibition by the Fotostiftung Schweiz also presents many unknown photographs, which have only recently come to light. These are juxtaposed with China photos by the star reporter Robert Capa. Capa worked in the same places as his friend Walter Bosshard and competed with him for features in the magazine Life.

Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize Shortlist Announced


British Journal of Photography

Photographs of a woman holding her baby, two shoppers, a drum majorette, and a child from a remote village in Sierra Leone have all been shortlisted for the National Portrait Gallery’s prestigious Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize this year. The prize winners will be announced at an award ceremony at the NPG on 16 October, with the overall winner receiving £15,000 and other cash prizes awarded to the shortlisted photographers at the judges’ discretion.

Two of the images were shot in London, with Max Barstow behind a striking photograph of two women in a busy shopping street in the city centre (above). The image comes from his series Londoners and in it, he says, his aim has been to “make unposed portraits with the intensity of images made by great studio photographers such as Richard Avedon and Irving Penn”.

Written in Light: Early Photography


Moderna Museet
Stockholm, Sweden
26 May 2018 - 13 January 2019

The exhibition Written in Light – Early Photography explores Moderna Museet’s collection of photography from the second half of the 19th century. Here you can see works by a few of history’s most prominent and fascinating photographers: Julia Margaret Cameron, Nils Strindberg, Carleton E. Watkins and many more.

Photography means “written in light”. Ever since it was first invented, photography has continued to develop and is constantly finding new applications and purposes. With the breakthrough of digital images, and their omnipresence in social media, photography is once again in a period of change. This gives all the more reason to reflect on how the history of photography impacts on contemporary photographic culture.

Thanks to two significant acquisitions in the mid-1960s, the Helmut Gernsheim Duplicate Collection, and the Helmer Bäckström Photohistorical Collection, some of the most prominent and admired photographers in history are represented at Moderna Museet, including portrait photographer Julia Margaret Cameron, Hill & Adamson, and landscape photographer Carleton E. Watkins.

Other fascinating photographic portfolios in the Moderna Museet collection are Nils Strindberg’s documentation of Salomon August Andrée’s Arctic Balloon expedition in 1897. And the exhibition also shows the Danish artist Joachim Koester’s work Message from Andrée (2005), which borrows its visual material from Strindberg’s documentation of the expedition.


Portland Art Museum
Portland, Oregon
9 December 2017 - 21 October 2018


Long before co-founding Aperture magazine or establishing the groundbreaking photography program at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, renowned modernist photographer Minor White (American, 1908-1976) moved to Portland, where he sowed the seeds of what would become a forceful artistic vision. This exhibition of White’s rarely exhibited early works celebrates the artist’s influence on the region, and honors the Museum’s dedication to acquiring and exhibiting photography as the institution enters its 125th year.

...The first phase of In the Beginning (on view December 9, 2017, through May 6, 2018) presents approximately 60 photographs of waterfront industrial buildings, Portland Civic Theatre portraits, night scenes, and images of Minor White teaching workshops in Oregon during the late 1950s and early 1960s. The second phase of the exhibition (on view May 12 through October 21, 2018) will feature downtown and Front Street scenes, photographs of Eastern Oregon, and images of two historic houses that White photographed for the Museum in 1942.

Philadelphia Museum of Art
Philadelphia, PA
26 June - 14 October 2018


Billie Holiday with her pit bull. Jacob Lawrence in his Coast Guard uniform. Georgia O’Keeffe with her Model A Ford. See how photographers helped craft the public personas of their creative subjects in this stunning collection of rare photographs from the Museum’s collection. The exhibition features works by Dorothy Norman, Man Ray, Richard Avedon, Alice O’Malley, and many others who captured some of the most fascinating artists and performers of the past 150 years.

LSU Museum of Art
Shaw Center for the Arts

Baton Rouge, LA
12 June - 14 October 2018 


Confluence by Jerry Uelsmann features sixty-five photographs from the artist’s recent series of work, produced from 2014 to 2017. 

While the aesthetics of these artworks align with Uelsmann’s esteemed and unique imagery, these black-and-white photographs evoke a new conversation, one inspired by an unlikely friendship with European art history scholar, Moa Petersen, Ph.D. Confluence demonstrates the natural flow of Uelsmann’s and Petersen’s intellectual friendship. Dealing with personal themes touching on the nature of love and loss, inner strength and self-love, this exhibition provides an intimate view of Uelsmann in his current chapter in life.

Uelsmann is renowned for his mastery of images that are visually fabricated silver prints. These photographs start with a camera, but are constructed in the darkroom. With his keen eye, he assembles these works with unrivaled dark room skills. Using multiple negatives and several enlargers, he creates single analog images through the dodging and burning of light and the masking of images from different negatives to make single works. Uelsmann takes pictures and makes new negatives as a catalog of images for future visual montages. No single negative made is to be printed alone; instead, each negative is like a sketch waiting to be realized in an entirely new work. His masterful works are precursors to the electronic manipulation now rendered by computers in photo-shopped images. 

Photography challenged the veracity of paintings in the 19th century and later was seen by American modernist “straight” photographers to reveal “truth” by artists like Ansel Adams and Edward Weston. In opposition to that stance, a post-modern Uelsmann manipulates images to seek surreal and poetic “truths.” Thematically his photographs explore nature and the human condition.