News from the World of Photography: December 2018

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On View: The Extraordinary Lives and Work of Martine Franck and Inge Morath
 

ProPhoto Daily


“Martine, I want to come and see your contact sheets.”

That was what Henri Cartier-Bresson said when he first met Martin Franck in 1966. The two were married in 1970 (despite a 30-year age difference) and shared a passion for photography. But Franck’s own career as a photographer was overshadowed by that of her husband, one of the founders of the Magnum photo collective. Franck admits she put her husband’s career ahead of her own. It wasn’t always easy.

“A painful example comes from the year in which they were
married, when the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London sent out invitations to what was to be Franck’s first solo exhibition which highlighted her husband’s name and his presence at the launch. She promptly cancelled the show,” notes AnOther.

Now an exhibition at the 
Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson (through Feb. 10, 2019) shines an overdue spotlight on Franck’s work. The retrospective of 140 images serves also as a debut for the Fondation’s new and expanded space in Paris’s Marais district.

Meanwhile, the work and extraordinary life of pioneering Magnum photographer Inge Morath is celebrated in the new book Inge Morath: An Illustrated Biography...

Beyond the Myth of the War Photographer


The New York Times LENS


The myth of the war photographer is hard to dispel. Infused with machismo, the Hollywood archetype is the hard-living, scarf-wearing loner dashing from one war zone to the next, with romantic partners as expendable as bullets. But clichés ignore the doubts, fears and moral quandaries as well as the loneliness and pain that shadow those who document the depths of human depravity. Such emotional whiplash creates that other cliché — of the tragic, fallen heroes (or heroines) broken by the horrors they’ve witnessed.

The reality of the war photographer is, of course, far more nuanced...

A New Photographic Place Has Just Opened in Paris: La Comète!


The Eye of Photography

La Comète, Books & Photography is a library-gallery opened by PICTO lab.

Like a tribute to his grandfather Pierre Gassmann, mythical figure of French photography in the second half of the 20th century, Philippe Gassmann, current CEO of the PICTO group, chose to call this new venue La Comète, in memory of the first PICTO lab in La Comète street in Paris in the early 1950s.

La Comète is at 29 rue des Récollets in the 10th arrondissement of Paris. For PICTO it is a question of creating a kind of agora where professionals and amateurs will find different services to their needs … Thus, on the first floor of the bookstore is a new fine art photo workshop, where photographers and amateurs can find two forms of services: access to high definition and self-service quality scanners, and assisted inkjet printing with the lab’s expert board.

The artistic direction of La Comète is carried out by The Eyes, in the continuity of its expertise in the field of photo editing. It is a question of stimulating programming of installations, meetings, and workshops in the service of photographers and passionate about images.

Brassaï

SFMOMA
San Francisco, CA
17 November 2018 - 17 February 2019

 

Best known for his provocative and enigmatic images of Parisian life between the two world wars, the photographer Brassaï (born Gyula Halász) is one of the most prominent figures of twentieth-century photography. Called “the eye of Paris” by his friend Henry Miller, Brassaï’s work both celebrates and reveals the complexities and hidden sides of French society and culture.

This thematic survey of his career focuses on his celebrated depictions of 1930s Paris, where he photographed lovers, prostitutes, workers, and gatherings in cafés, bars, and dance halls with an intimate candor that’s still striking today. The exhibition also includes powerful portraits of his artist friends—Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dalí, and Henri Matisse, among others—and the city’s creative avant-garde. Brassaï brings together outstanding prints of the artist’s best work along with many never-before-seen photographs.

Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940–1950


The National Gallery of Art
Washington DC
4 November 2018 - 18 February 2019


 During the 1940s American photographer Gordon Parks (1912–2006) grew from a self-taught photographer making portraits and documenting everyday life in Saint Paul and Chicago to a visionary professional shooting for Ebony, Vogue, Fortune, and Life. For the first time, the formative decade of Parks’s 60-year career is the focus of an exhibition, which brings together 150 photographs and ephemera—including magazines, books, letters, and family pictures. The exhibition will illustrate how Parks’s early experiences at the Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information, and Standard Oil (New Jersey) as well as his close relationships with Roy Stryker, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and Ralph Ellison, helped shape his groundbreaking style. A fully illustrated catalog, with extensive new research and previously unpublished images, will accompany the exhibition.
 

Leonard Freed: Worldview


Jewish Museum of Belgium
Bruxelles, Belgium
18 October 2018 - 17 March 2019


Leonard Freed (1929-2006) is one of the most important reporters of the twentieth century. His photographs taken in the United States, Europe and the Middle East have made the front pages of many newspapers. Member of the famous Magnum agency, he is part of the great tradition of photographic reporting. Freed is one of the most famous representatives of concerned photography.

The retrospective, created by the Musée de l'Elysée in collaboration with Magnum Photos, Paris and the Fotomuseum in The Hague, traces the career of a man who lives by and for photography. In addressing the major events of the past fifty years - including the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the civil rights movement in the United States, post-war Germany and the Romanian revolution - Freed takes a penetrating and caring look at individuals inseparable from their environment. 

Nobuyoshi Araki: Integral Photo Lesson


The Eye of Photography

“Photograph with kindness, look with kindness, light with kindness”

For the first time, in these interviews where he comments one after the other 336 photographs covering his work from 1963 to 2010, the most famous contemporary Japanese photographer, Nobuyoshi Araki, tells his conception of his work and his many influences, from Eugène Atget to Yousuf Karsh or Robert Frank.

For Araki, “to live is to photograph”. In an approach that will pave the way for Nan Goldin and Sophie Calle, he claims the notion of photographic autofiction and documents his life often in its most intimate aspects such as his honeymoon or the untimely death of his wife.

For him  “documentary is a series of looks, followed by a discovery and an emotion” he reveals that “there is always an emotional connection” with his subject. “Taking photos is a face-to-face”.

Through a series of anecdotes mixing a lot of fun, a disarming frankness and an often poignant emotion, the artist remembers with remarkable precision the circumstances surrounding the taking of his photos. Inventor of the word “Erotos”, he says that the meeting of Eros and Thanatos has been his main focus all his life, since his children’s games in the prostitutes cemetery of Yoshiwara...


International Center of Photography
Caixa Forum Lleida
Lleida, Spain
27 September 2018 – 27 January 2019

 

This exhibition presents Robert Capa’'s color work for the first time. Capa regularly used color film from the 1940s until his death in 1954. Some of these photographs were published in magazines of the day, but the majority have never been printed, seen, or even studied. Over the years, this aspect of Capa’s career has virtually been forgotten. With over 100 contemporary color prints by the famous photojournalist, Capa in Color presents this work an integral part of his post-war career and fundamental in remaining relevant to magazines.

Capa in Color will explore how he started to see anew with color film and how his work adapted to a new postwar sensibility. The new medium required him to readjust to color compositions, but also to a postwar audience, interested in being entertained and transported to new places.

The exhibition is drawn entirely from the Robert Capa Archive in ICP’s permanent collection. The Archive contains roughly 4,200 color transparencies - 35mm Kodachrome, 21⁄4 Ektachrome, and some larger Kodachrome sheet film. It also includes thousands of vintage black-and-white prints, negatives, tearsheets, and papers.

Ansel Adams in Our Time


Museum of Fine Arts Boston
Boston, MA
13 December 2018 – 24 February 2019


Ansel Adams in Our Time traces the iconic visual legacy of Ansel Adams (1902–1984), presenting some of his most celebrated prints, from a symphonic view of snow-dusted peaks in The Tetons and Snake River, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming (1942) to an aerial shot of a knotted roadway in Freeway Interchange, Los Angeles (1967). The exhibition looks both backward and forward in time: his black-and-white photographs are displayed alongside prints by several of the 19th-century government survey photographers who greatly influenced Adams, as well as work by contemporary artists whose modern-day concerns centered on the environment, land rights, and the use and misuse of natural resources point directly to Adams’ legacy.

Adams’ stunning images were last on view at the MFA in a major exhibition in 2005; this new, even larger presentation places his work in the context of the 21st century, with all that implies about the role photography has played—and continues to play—in our changing perceptions of the land. The Adams photographs in the exhibition are drawn from the Lane Collection, one of the largest and most significant gifts in MFA history.