News from the World of Photography: June 2018

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Not an Ostrich: And Other Images from America's Library


Annenberg Space for Photography 
Los Angeles, CA
21 April - 9 September 2018


Not an Ostrich: And Other Images from America’s Library is the result of celebrated American photography curator Anne Wilkes Tucker’s excavation of nearly 500 images—out of a collection of over 14 million—permanently housed at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. While visitors to the exhibition might never see an ostrich, they will see the image entitled “Not an Ostrich” and a large selection of rare and handpicked works from the vaults of the world’s largest library, many never widely available to the public.

This exhibition spans across the history of photography—from daguerreotypes, the first photographic process, to contemporary digital prints. Iconic portraits of Abraham Lincoln, John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Cesar Chavez, and Elizabeth Taylor appear alongside unusual images, such as, Stanley Kubrick’s “Strong Man’s Family” (1947), John Vachon’s “Ice Fishing, Minnesota” (1956), Susana Raab’s “Chicken in Love, Athens, OH” (2006) and Nina Berman’s “Flammable Faucet #4, Monroeton, PA” (2011). Vivid color portrayals of America, across time, are highlighted in juxtapositions of popular travel views from the late 19th century, created by the Detroit Publishing Company using the then-latest “photochrom” technology, on a screen next to striking contemporary scenes captured by Carol M. Highsmith.

David Douglas Duncan,102, Who Photographed the Reality of War, Dies

The New York Times

Under the helmets, the faces are young and tormented, stubbled and dirty, taut with the strain of battle. They sob over dead friends. They stare exhausted into the fog and rain. They crouch in a muddy foxhole. This goddamn cigarette could be the last. There are no heroes in David Douglas Duncan’s images of war.

Dark and brooding, mostly black and white, they are the stills of a legendary combat photographer, an artist with a camera, who brought home to America the poignant lives of infantrymen and fleeing civilians caught up in World War II, the Korean conflict and the war in Vietnam.

“I felt no sense of mission as a combat photographer,” Mr. Duncan, who was wounded several times, told The New York Times in 2003. “I just felt maybe the guys out there deserved being photographed just the way they are, whether they are running scared, or showing courage, or diving into a hole, or talking and laughing. And I think I did bring a sense of dignity to the battlefield.”...

Winslow Homer and the Camera: Photography and the Art of Painting


Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Brunswick, ME
23 June - 28 October 2018

 

This exhibition explores the question of Homer’s relationship with the medium of photography and its impact on his artistic practice. As one attuned to appearances and how to represent them, Homer understood that photography, as a new technology of sight, had much to reveal. This exhibition thus adds an important new dimension to our appreciation of this pioneering American painter, demonstrating his recognition that photography did not undermine, but instead complemented his larger artistic interests.

Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Decisive Moment


International Center of Photography
New York, NY
23 May - 2 September 2018

 Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Decisive Moment examines Cartier-Bresson’s influential publication, widely considered to be one of the most important photobooks of the twentieth century. Pioneering for its emphasis on the photograph itself as a unique narrative form, The Decisive Moment was described by Robert Capa as “a Bible for photographers.” Originally titled Images à la Sauvette (“images on the run”) in the French, the book was published in English with a new title, The Decisive Moment, which unintentionally imposed the motto which would define Cartier-Bresson’s work. The exhibition details how the decisions made by the collaborators in this major project—including Cartier-Bresson, French art publisher Tériade, American publisher Simon & Schuster, and Henri Matisse, who designed the book’s cover—have shaped our understanding of Cartier-Bresson’s photographs. Through vintage gelatin silver prints, first-edition publications, periodicals, and correspondence, Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Decisive Moment brings new insights to this iconic work. 

Portfolio Showcase 11: Exhibition & Publication


The Center for Fine Art Photography
Fort Collins, CO
13 June - 7 July 2018
ARTISTS

Laura J. Bennett – Solo Exhibition Winner
JoAnn Carney
Teri Havens
Sharon Kain
Michael Knapstein
Melissa Lazuka
Florian Mueller
David Pace and Stephen Wirtz
Laura Pannack
Jerry Takigawa

What Is Art Photography? Catherine Edelman Offers Her Opinion

LensCulture

Debuting with the Ballad of Sexual Dependency by Nan Goldin in 1987, Catherine Edelman Gallery has been a leader in the fine art world for more than thirty years. Representing artists like Bruce Davidson, Michael Kenna, Joel-Peter Witkin, Jess T. Dugan and many more, the gallery is a respected institution in the US and beyond. In the past, the gallery has shown a wide variety of work, including documentary photography (Susan Meiselas, James Nachtwey), fashion photography (Annie Leibovitz, Herb Ritts), and traditional landscape photographs (Michael Kenna)...


National Portrait Gallery
London, UK
7 March - 27 May 2019 

A major new exhibition of works by Martin Parr, one of Britain’s best-known and most widely celebrated photographers. Only Human: Martin Parr, brings together some of Parr’s best-known photographs with a number of works never exhibited before to focus on one of his most engaging subjects – people. The exhibition will include portraits of people from around the world, with a special focus on Parr’s wry observations of Britishness, explored through a series of projects that investigate British identity today, including new works which reveal Parr’s take on the social climate in Britain in the aftermath of the EU referendum.

"Style: A Century of Fashion Photography, 1911-2011" at Getty


Blouin Artinfo

Chronicling the trends of fashion photography that have defined evolving ideas of style and beauty through the century, the J.Paul Getty Museum presents  Style: A Century of Fashion Photography, 1911-2011, June 26-October 21.

The exhibition includes more than 160 fashion images, including work by the likes of Herb Ritts, Lillian Bassman, Richard Avedon, Guy Bourdin, Erwin Blumenfeld, Louise Dahl-Wolfe, Hiro, and Scott Schuman. The show includes a variety of supplementary material, including illustrations, magazine covers, videos, and advertisements. Works by lesser-known but influential artists such as Corinne Day, Gleb Derujinsky, Toni Frissell, and Kourken Pakchanian are also included.

Robert Weingarten: Focus on Infinity


Los Angeles Public Library
6 June - 5 August 2018 

For the large-scale photographs in this exhibition, Los Angeles photographer Robert Weingarten established a single viewpoint, looking southeast over Santa Monica Bay, from which every photograph in the series would be made with the camera in exactly the same position. Each exposure would be made at precisely the same time of day—6:30 a.m.—measured by a quartz clock. All exposures were made with the lens focused on infinity and at the same aperture of f/22. Just two variables were allowed into this disciplined scheme: the shutter speed of the lens, which would be adjusted faster or slower depending on the quantity and quality of light available at 6:30 a.m. each day; and, the most variable element of all, changes in the scene that were introduced by the forces of nature. The resulting images are at once conceptual and an homage to a city at the edge of the North American continent, showcasing the unique light conditions that inform life here.

Chronicling the Lives of Women Along the Colombian-Venezuelan Border


The New York Times LENS Blog
 

Juanita Escobar likes to immerse herself in her projects. The self-taught photographer spent eight years living among the llaneros, the cowboys who work the plains of Colombia.  Now she has gone even farther, moving to what is perhaps her country’s most rural — and distant — 300 kilometer stretch of the Orinoco River, where she has been chronicling life along the border between Colombia and Venezuela...

International Photography Competition 2018


The Florida Museum of Photographic Arts (FMoPA)
Tampa, FL

Check out winners in each category (Conceptual, Abstract, Still Life, Documentary, Social, and Political Journalism, Nature, Science, and Animals, Places, Landscapes, and Drone, People and Portraits, & finally People’s Choice)...

11th Julia Margaret Cameron Award


The Photography Gala Awards

570 women photographers from 63 countries participated in the 11th edition of the Julia Margaret Cameron Award for Women Photographers Award submitting 5732 images. Given the quality of works, the juror, assisted by the team of curators of The Gala Awards have decided to award three photographers in this edition, that will share the First Prize. The prize of $3,000 will be divided among the three winners of the Award.

We're happy to announce that Monica Gorini from Italy, Diana Nicholette Jeon from United States, and Isabella Pacini from Germany, were selected as winners of the 11th edition of the Julia Margaret Cameron Award.

Their work will be exhibited in the 5th Biennial of Fine Art & Documentary Photography to be held in Barcelona this October.


British Journal of Photography

Europe boasts more than a hundred photography festivals, but few match the scale and ambition of Photo España in Madrid. This year, the organisation behind it, La Fábrica, celebrates the festival’s 20th edition with a typically eclectic summer season of activities throughout the Spanish capital, encompassing the work of more than 500 artists across dozens of venues that range from the small to the iconic.

“The festival is a collective project with a wide variety of institutions, both public and private, supporting it,” says director Claude Bussac, who is hoping that the 2018 edition will “push forward both the formal and geographical boundaries of photography… We aim to celebrate our 20th anniversary questioning photographic meaning and inviting photographers from every continent.”...

Dorothea Lange: Politics of Seeing at Barbican Centre


The Guardian

The Barbican in London is staging the first UK survey of the work of American documentary photographer Dorothea Lange (1895–1965), one of the most influential photographers of the 20th century. The exhibition charts Lange’s output and includes her celebrated Farm Security Administration work that captured the devastating impact of the Great Depression on the American population.

Dorothea Lange: Politics of Seeing
Barbican Art Gallery, London 
22 June – 2 September 2018


AnOther

American image-maker Saul Leiter was a famously private man, keeping a markedly low profile throughout his lifetime in spite of the widespread acclaim he garnered as a fashion photographer in the 60s and 70s. His modus operandi was one of constant, quiet observation, whether capturing glorious Kodachrome studies of the New York City streets or lensing models for the likes of Harper’s Bazaar and Elle. “There’s a great story that Grace Coddington tells in her biography,” Margit Erb, director of the Saul Leiter Foundation, tells AnOther. “She was to be photographed by the famous Saul Leiter and was told to meet him in one of the squares in Manhattan. She went there and stood and waited for about half an hour but he was a no-show. She went back to the office and said, ‘I tried to find him but I couldn’t,’ and the director said, ‘Oh no, he’s photographed you!’ Saul had a telephoto lens and he’d waited for her to arrive, photographed her from a distance as she stood there waiting – probably with her hips out in a very natural way – and he got the image.”...

Musée Nicéphore Niépce
Chalon-sur-Saône, FR
16 June - 16 September 2018 


(translated from French)

Offering an updated, broader vision of the pictorialist endeavour on a European scale, 'Artists’ Visions' results from recent research and discoveries and is the first exhibition dedicated to pictorial photography for over a decade in France. Sourced in the collections of the musée Nicéphore Niépce that preserves works by Robert Demachy and Charles Lhermitte, as well as prints by Constant Puyo, José Ortiz-Echagüe and Alfred Fauvarque-Omez, the exhibition brings together over two-hundred vintage prints. They are the work of various authors, some of them famous, others little known even unknown, until now. Most of these prints are being shown for the very first time. They were created over a seventy-year period, from the early 1890s to the late 1950s, showing that pictorial photography did not disappear after the First World War, contrary to what the history of photography traditionally lead us to believe. The narrative has changed and a new history must be taken into account acknowledging the permanence of the pictorialist ideals. These ideals were built on a shared ambition: to create photographs that wanted to do more than simply reproduce the real, photographs that truly interpreted it, like an artist’s vision.

British Journal of Photography

Yassine Alaoui Ismaili (Morocco), Paul Botes (South Africa), Anna Boyiazis (USA), Tommaso Fiscaletti & Nic Grobler (South Africa), and Phumzile Khanyile (South Africa) are the five winners of the seventh CAP Prize. Open to photographers of any age or background, the CAP Prize is awarded to work that engages with the African continent or its diaspora...
LensCulture

John Chiara’s one-of-a-kind mural-size camera obscura prints are luscious, moody and magical. He builds his own giant cameras (one which is large enough for him to climb inside) so he can expose light directly onto large sheets of photo-sensitive paper to capture images without needing film to act as an intermediate negative. His photos offer up ordinary urban landscapes that seem like three dimensional sculptures infused with light flares and liquid color. Somehow—through his mix of the direct process, hand-cut photo paper, filters and chemicals—everything looks real but “charged” with heightened energy.

Each of the unique prints is a collector’s dream, and a generous new book from Aperture and Pier 24 offers perfect reproductions with stunning production values...

Photography in Berlin

Galerie 36 is pleased to present the first comprehensive exhibition of the visionary advertising images by American photographer Bert Stern (1929 – 2013) from the early fifties to the late sixties. The exhibition “Shapes & Symbols” shows a selection of iconic photographs that emerged during the highly productive time of his rise to become one of the leading advertising photographers. Many of the works exhibited have never before been publicly displayed outside publications and magazines of their time and can now be seen for the first time in terms of their artistic value...