News from the World of Photography: August 2018

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Life and Dreams: Contemporary Chinese Photography and Media Art


The Walther Collection
Neu-Ulm, Germany
Until 18 November 2018

 

The Walther Collection presents Life and Dreams: Contemporary Chinese Photography and Media Art, the first extensive exhibition of works by Chinese artists represented in The Walther Collection. Featuring forty-three artists, Life and Dreams showcases a wide range of groundbreaking photography and media art produced by internationally recognized figures such as Yang Fudong, Zhang Peili, Ai Weiwei, Song Dong, Cao Fei, and Zhang Huan during an era of momentous social and economic change. It also incorporates new acquisitions and selected loans of significant media art by innovative younger artists such as Sun Xun, Lu Yang, and Cheng Ran to provide an up-to-the-minute account of the main directions and key achievements in contemporary Chinese photography and media art during the past three decades.

This Land


Pier 24
San Francisco, CA
1 June 2018 - 31 March 2019

This Land focuses on work made throughout the United States within the past decade. The photographers assembled here examine aspects of the country’s current social climate, from the mundane to the politicized.

The exhibition’s title is drawn from Woody Guthrie’s song “This Land Is Your Land” (1940). Viewed by many as an alternative national anthem, it alludes to the uneasy tensions fundamental to our vision of this nation filled with promise and peril, possibilities and letdowns. At the bottom of the sheet of paper on which Guthrie handwrote the song’s lyrics, he noted, “all you can write is what you see.” The artists included in this exhibition use cameras rather than pens, creating photographs that speak to what they see in the United States today.

Lucas Foglia: Human Nature


Museum of Contemporary Photography (MoCP)
Columbia College, Chicago, IL
19 July - 30 September 2018

 

The relationship between humans and nature is both symbiotic and fraught. In the present era of climate change, scientists and conservationists are scrambling to find solutions to myriad challenges such as resource depletion, ecosystem transformation, overpopulation, and species extinction. As our destruction of the natural world becomes more pervasive, our interactions with wilderness are in turn increasingly restrained, and the experiences we do have with nature often occur in human-made environments. In fact, we are spending more time than ever indoors, even as social science research indicates that a connection to nature is vital to our well-being.

Lucas Foglia (American, b. 1983) is interested in these complexities, and particularly in disputing the notion that people and nature are at odds. He began his project Human Nature (2006–16) in order to probe our relationship to the wilderness and to explore our fundamental need to commune with nature. With the skills of a seasoned photographer, and often with a touch of humor, he documents leisure activities, exploration, and some of the science behind climate change—often in remote locations. 

China Is Still Sorting Through Its Colorful Bike-Share Graveyards


The Atlantic

 In March, author Alan Taylor posted “The Bike-Share Oversupply in China: Huge Piles of Abandoned and Broken Bicycles,” showing just some of the millions of bicycles that had been rapidly built and dumped into Chinese cities by bike-share companies looking to get in on the next big thing, only to crash hard. In the months since, more of those bike-share startups have gone bankrupt or consolidated, and the bicycle graveyards remain. Municipal governments are still wrangling with the fallout, confiscating derelict or illegally parked bikes, crafting new laws, and working out what to do with millions of abandoned bicycles. In a few cases, plans have been announced to refurbish and distribute some of the bikes to smaller neighboring towns, in others, wholesale recycling has begun, and bicycles are being crushed into cubes. The scale of the situation was so large to begin with, it will be a long time before the bicycle graveyards fade away.
 

Pentti Sammallahti, Finland’s top photographer


The Economist

Under a low sun, a frog with a thuggish expression swims alone in a pond, its black reflection a crisply outlined mirror image on the still water. It stares straight ahead; an eye-to-eye confrontation seems imminent. This sinister yet amusing picture was taken by Pentti Sammallahti, a 68-year-old Finnish photographer with an unusual status: he is at once feted and deliberately low-profile.

His modest prices—prints start at €600 ($702)—are part of the explanation. Peter Fetterman, who exhibited Mr Sammallahti’s work at the Masterpiece fair in London this month, says he “is the best photographer whose work you can afford.”...

Artist Collier Schorr on the Medium and the Message


AnOther

After 20 years of making pictures that span fashion, art and collage Collier Schorr’s studio is, predictably, a bit of a mess. “[It’s] small, and in disarray,” she tells me, smiling, before the opening of her new solo exhibition, In Front of the Camera at London’s Modern Art gallery. “It’s constantly being cleaned, and then I do collages for a fashion story, and it becomes a complete hellhole of scraps of paper. And what happens then is that pictures float around and get mixed up and get lost and get found years later.”...


IPPAWARDS

The iPhone Photography Awards (IPPAWARDS) is proud to announce the winners of the 11th Annual Awards. This year’s winners were selected from thousands of entries submitted by iPhone photographers from over 140 countries around the world...

The First Photograph


Harry Ransom Center
The University of Texas at Austin

The First Photograph, or more specifically, the earliest known surviving photograph made in a camera, was taken by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826 or 1827. The image depicts the view from an upstairs window at Niépce's estate, Le Gras, in the Burgundy region of France. Learn more about the First Photograph through the links provided on the Harry Ransom Center website.

Overlooked Stories From Latin American Photographers


The New York Times LENS Blog

In the South Bronx’s Melrose neighborhood, second only to Times Square as New York’s busiest, residents may soon find plenty of reasons to stop and enjoy the view.

Hustling to the subway or bustling among shoppers on tightly packed sidewalks, they can happen upon arresting new sights: images of life in Latin America and the Caribbean, mounted on a chain-link fence along a sidewalk, arrayed in a community garden or displayed on the grounds of Immaculate Conception School.

Melrose is becoming a gallery, inside and out. For its Latin American Foto Festival, the Bronx Documentary Center is again sharing photography with the community it calls home. The festival, running July 12 to 22, busts past the white walls of exhibition spaces with eight installations, seven beyond the center.  

Photo essays from more than a dozen acclaimed and emerging documentary photographers from Colombia, Peru, Ecuador, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and Mexico, as well as contributions from FotoKids, which teaches photography to Guatemalan children, will hang in and outside neighborhood landmarks and city streets...  

Cortona on the Move: International Photography Festival


Cortona On The Move
Cortona, Italy
12 July - 30 September 2018


Founded in 2011 by the Associazione Culturale ONTHEMOVE, the principal objective of Cortona On The Move is to spread and promote contemporary photography by bringing new creative talents and novel forms of visual communication to the forefront.

Under the artistic direction of Arianna Rinaldo, the festival provides a continuing exchange between field experts and a ceaseless search for work which represents the ongoing evolution of the photographic language, all showcased within the enchanting Etruscan hilltown of Cortona.

Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings


Peabody Essex Museum
Salem, Massachusetts
30 June - 23 September 2018

For more than forty years, Sally Mann has made experimental and hauntingly beautiful images that have made her one of the country’s most influential and distinguished photographers. The artist’s first major traveling exhibition, Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings, explores themes of family, memory, mortality, and home as well as the Southern landscape as repository of personal and collective memory. Some 115 photographs — many of which have not been exhibited or published previously — offer a sweeping overview of Mann’s artistic achievement, vision, and drive.

Here Sarah Kennel, PEM's Byrne Family Curator of Photography, talks about the pioneering artist and the enduring power of photography to tell important stories...

How Amy Arbus Confronted the Death of Her Mother, Diane


AnOther

In 1992, Amy Arbus took a masterclass with Richard Avedon at the International Center of Photography in New York and embarked on a project that would forever change her relationship to the medium. She took a single roll of black and white self-portraits in a bathtub, where she began to confront and consider the death of her mother Diane Arbus, who committed suicide in one on July 26, 1971.

Then 38 years old, it had been 21 years since her mother’s death, and Arbus set about revisiting a scene she had never witnessed herself. The result was an intense series of eight photographs, which will be on view in Tub Pictures at The Schoolhouse Gallery in Provincetown, MA, from next week until August 8, 2018. We caught up with Arbus to discuss this powerful body of work, and the ways in which it transformed her life...


New Mexico Museum of Art
Santa Fe, New Mexico
Until 4 November 2018


Shifting Light offers a twenty-first century perspective on the museum’s long-term engagement with the popular medium of photography. Organized into the broad categories of land and place, culture and identity, community and interconnection, and vision and creativity, the exhibition juxtaposes photographs in ways that amplify their meanings and suggest new narratives. Ansel Adams’ famous 1940 photograph Moonrise, Hernandez is paired with a 1975 landscape by Thomas Barrow from his series Cancellations, while Alfred Stieglitz’s 1918 portrait of Georgia O’Keeffe keeps company with images by Anne Noggle and Joyce Neimanas.

Christie's

A landmark sale features rare examples of works by 19th and 20th-century American masters of the medium, including Alfred Stieglitz, Edward Steichen, Dorothea Lange, Edward Weston, Paul Strand and many more...
 
On 4 and 5 October, key works by Steiglitz will be offered at Christie’s in New York in a dedicated sale, An American Journey: The Diann G. and Thomas A. Mann Collection of Photographic Masterworks. The Mann Collection contains his most iconic works from the Photo-Secessionist period, printed as oversized photogravures; each example is signed and mounted. 
 
Included in the sale are prints of The Terminal (1892), The Hand of Man (1902), and the artists’ own print of The Steerage (1907). Perhaps Steiglitz’s most frequently reproduced photograph, The Steerage was exhibited in both the 1917 Society of Independent Artists’ show in New York and the 1944 Philadelphia Museum of Art exhibition that surveyed his work and personal collection.

These key prints come to auction alongside rare examples of works by Steiglitz’s counterparts in the Photo-Secession, including Edward Steichen, Gertrude Käsebier and Clarence White, and Modernist masterworks by Edward Weston, Paul Strand 
and Charles Sheeler.

SFMOMA
San Francisco, CA
21 July - 21 October 2018 


From war and human rights to cultural identity and domestic violence, Susan Meiselas’s (American, b. 1948) work covers a wide range of subjects and countries. This retrospective brings together projects from the beginning of her career in the 1970s to the present day, including her iconic portraits of carnival strippers, vivid color images of the conflicts in Central America in the 1980s, and an ongoing investigation into the history and aftermath of the Kurdish genocide.

A member of Magnum Photos since 1976, Meiselas creates work that raises provocative questions about documentary practice, and the relationship between photographer and subject. The exhibition highlights her unique working method, combining photography, video, sound, and installation to explore different scales of time and conflict, ranging from the personal to the geopolitical.

The Los Angeles Times

In the early 1970s, a decade into shooting conflicts around the world, Don McCullin said in the exhibition catalog "The Concerned Photographer 2": "I haven't got very much longer to go at being a war photographer. I mean the chips are down already."

And yet a few years ago, at 80, McCullin could be found in Iraq, camera in hand.

McCullin is a giant in the field of war reportage, though you'd barely know it from his show at the Hauser & Wirth gallery in Los Angeles. Billed as the London-born, Somerset-based photojournalist's first gallery exhibition in the U.S., it's more missed opportunity than proper introduction. At just under 30 pictures, it presents a thin slice — more frosting than cake — of a broad and deep career chronicling military, political, social and economic strife...
Tate Modern
London, UK
Until 14 October 2018


Shape of Light is the first major exhibition to explore the relationship between the two, spanning the century from the 1910s to the present day. It brings to life the innovation and originality of photographers over this period, and shows how they responded and contributed to the development of abstraction. 
 
Key photographs are brought together from pioneers including Man Ray and Alfred Stieglitz, major contemporary artists such as Barbara Kasten and Thomas Ruff, right up to exciting new work by Antony Cairns, Maya Rochat and Daisuke Yokota, made especially for the exhibition.