News from the World of Photography: April 2019

V&A Photography Centre receives major donation from Sir Elton John and David Furnish


British Photographic History

The V&A has announced a new, long-term collaboration with Sir Elton John and David Furnish to revolutionise public access to photography. Comprising a significant donation towards the museum’s recently opened Photography Centre, for which gallery 101 will be renamed ‘The Sir Elton John and David Furnish Gallery’, the partnership will also include a major co-curated temporary exhibition, to be announced in due course...

2019 Portfolio Prize Winner: Mark McKnight


Aperture

Mark McKnight is a modern-day modernist. His black-and-white photographs of skin and sand, brick and tar, with their rich tones and sparkling light, are redolent of twentieth-century masterworks, those pictures by men like Edward Weston who cast the world in silver-gelatin. Weston once said the camera should be used for recording the “quintessence of the thing itself, whether polished steel or palpitating flesh.” But for McKnight, who was born in Los Angeles to a New Mexican, Hispana-identified mother, something was missing from Weston’s vision. Something that would ignite a flame of recognition in a young queer man with ideas about male beauty more expansive than the Eurocentric standard. Something that would make “straight” photography a little less straight...

A Mexican Photographer Explores the Enduring Bonds of Her Indigenous Culture


The New York Times LENS Blog
 
The homes, streets and shops that make a community tangible may crumble, and its residents may scatter, but the invisible bonds of culture, love and longing endure. This is not mere nostalgia. It sustains life itself.

Among the indigenous people from Yalálag in Mexico’s Oaxaca state, these ties bind them to one another, no matter where they may have migrated in search of opportunity. Citlali Fabián’s parents hailed from there, moved to Mexico City, and returned to Oaxaca City, which is 90 grueling kilometers away from Yalálag. But no matter where Ms. Fabián lived, her heritage kept her — and others — close to the cradle of her people, who descended from the Zapotecs.

“Why is it that despite the distance and separation there is that need to stay connected?” Ms. Fabián said. “We who are born away from there, how do we keep the same preference to work, or to celebrate as if they were still there, or the music? It’s interesting how years and generations pass, and we still dance to the same music my grandparents and parents did. It’s the same dance they taught me. It’s very interesting to see the reconnection of generations. You don’t have to live in a specific place. It’s beautiful to create — and recreate — a community when you are away from it.”

Her project, “Soy de Yalálag” — I’m From Yalálag — is a quiet look at the town, its residents and its diaspora, focusing not on what they lack materially, but the richness of a culture that endures and sustains. It is deeply personal, which gives her images of festivals, family and friends an emotional heft that reassures and reaffirms...

Federico Borella wins Photographer of the Year


The British Journal of Photography

Federico Borella has been named Photographer of the Year at the 2019 Sony World Photography Awards, winning the $25,000 prize for his series Five Degrees – a look at male suicide in the farming community of Tamil Nadu, southern India, which is facing its worst drought in 140 years. The Italian photographer’s work takes its lead from a Berkeley University study, which found a correlation between climate change and increased suicide rates among Indian farmers, and explores the impact of both via images of the farming landscape, mementoes of the farmers, and portraits of their survivors.

“As global warming changes the face of life ever more rapidly – particularly in developing and underdeveloped nations – the work of artists such as Borella becomes ever more needed,” commented Mike Trow, chair of the professional jury. He added that this year’s submissions “provoked a lot of debate and interest amongst the jury” with works “pushing the boundaries of photography and challenging the perceptions and expectations the audience”. 

High Museum Names Sarah Kennel Curator of Photography


Art News

 The High Museum of Art in Atlanta has appointed Sarah Kennel as its curator of photography, a position she currently holds at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts. She starts at the museum on July 1.

“I am delighted to join the High at a vital moment of growth for the photography program and am inspired by the institution’s commitment to curatorial excellence, relevance, and equity,” Kennel stated in a release. “The High has played a key role in defining the range of American photographic practice, especially with its commitment to civil rights and Southern photography.”

The High holds one of the largest collections of photography from the Civil Rights Movement, and the museum’s gallery for photography recently expanded by 3,000 square feet during the museum’s collection reinstallation. Among the photographers in its collection are such artists as Eugene Atget, Wynn Bullock, Harry Callahan, and Evelyn Hofer.

Rand Suffolk, director of the High, said, “Sarah’s myriad accomplishments as a curator and scholar, together with her commitment to innovation and inclusion, make her exceptionally well-suited to lead the continued growth of our active photography department.”

 

Cantor wins major photography archive and endowment for Stanford


Datebook

Ansel Adams made only six “museum sets” containing 75 of his best pictures. That’s why when he offered one to a Los Angeles money management firm shortly before his death, its officers jumped at the opportunity.

That purchase, 38 years ago, started a collection that grew to 1,000 images by seven major American photographers before the firm, Capital Group, decided to give it all away to one university. An informal competition was held among 20 top university art museums nationwide, and on Tuesday, March 12, Stanford University announced its Cantor Arts Center as the victor.

The Capital Group Foundation Photography Collection at Stanford University is accompanied by a $2 million endowment, and a full-time curator will be hired to manage it. The collection goes deep into the careers of Adams, Edward S. Curtis, Edward Weston, Wright Morris, John Gutmann, Gordon Parks and Helen Levitt. All of the prints were made by the artists.

Cantor plans to mount the premiere in September, with a show of selections from the Adams 75, plus the 386 images by Weston...

Photographs: New York Auction 4 April 2019 Results

Phillips Auctions


Vice

In the nearly two centuries since Daguerre's classic 1838 Parisian street scene, exposed for several minutes, miraculously capturing two men who stayed still long enough to show up on the negative, attitudes towards street photography, photographing in public, and the possibility of the medium—digital or not—to achieve any sense of objective truth have changed continuously. And the debates have been contentious. For years, many traditionalists treated the genre with a rigid sense of rules prescribed by street-photo-godfather Henri Cartier-Bresson. No double exposures, no printing techniques that might obscure the original content on the negative, no cropping that could change what was captured. Some insisted on including the edges of the negative on their prints as “proof” that the original photo had not been altered.

And then Photoshop and digital photography opened up a whole new can of worms...

Luigi Ghirri: The Map and the Territory


Jeu de Paume
Concorde, Paris
12 February - 2 June 2019


This first retrospective of photographs taken outside his native Italy by Luigi Ghirri (1943- 1992) focuses on the 1970s. It covers a decade in which Luigi Ghirri produced a corpus of colour photographs unparalleled in Europe at that time.

Luigi Ghirri, who was a trained surveyor, began taking photographs at weekends in the early 1970s, devising projects and themes as he roamed up and down the streets, the piazzas and the suburbs of Modena. He cast an attentive and affectionate eye on the signs of the outside world, observing, without openly commenting on them, the changes wrought by humans to the landscape and the housing in the Reggio Emilia, his province of birth. It was a barometer for a local vernacular exposed to the advent of new forms of housing, leisure and advertising. “I am interested in ephemeral architecture, in the provincial world, in objects generally regarded as bad taste, as kitsch, but which have never been that for me, in objects charged with desires, dreams, collective memories [...], windows, mirrors, stars, palm trees, atlases, globes, books, museums and human beings seen through images.”

The Winning Photos of the 2019 Wet Plate Competition


The British Journal of Photography

Modern Collodion has just announced the winners of the 2019 Wet Plate Competition, the second annual contest for wet plate collodion photographers around the world after launching last year.

This year, over 220 photos were submitted by 90 photographers based in 19 different countries. The judges, Michael Godek, Giles Clement, Alex Timmermans, Tom DeLooza, and Paul Barden, spent nearly a month on “difficult deliberation” before deciding on the handful of winning wet plates.

50 years of Arles: Les Rencontres d’Arles 2019 programme


The British Journal of Photography

The biggest and most respected photo festival returns for its 50th year with 50 exhibitions that celebrate its history and influence, as well as championing cutting-edge photography and emerging talent

50 years ago, photographer Lucien Clergue, writer Michel Tournier and historian Jean-Maurice Rouquette put together the first edition of Les Rencontres d’Arles in the city’s town hall. They had three exhibitions – a group show tracing the history of photography, and solo shows by Gjon Mili and Edward Weston. Now it’s the largest and most prestigious photography festival in the world, and this summer, they celebrate 50 years with 50 exhibitions, looking back on their history and heritage, as well as championing cutting-edge photography and emerging talent.

Running from 01 July till 22 September, the festival is lead by director Sam Stourdzé for the sixth year. Last year, Stourdzé was criticised by a group of eminent photography specialists in an open letter urging him to include more women in the main programme. A year on, it seems they’ve taken the criticism on board. Marina Gadonneix, Germaine Krull, Helen Levitt, Evangelia Kranioti, Libuse Jarcovjakova, Camille Fallet, and Pixy Liao, among many more, appear on the main programme with solo shows; the festival also includes a section titled Replay, which is dedicated to female-led narratives...

Dorothea Lange: Politics of Seeing


Frist Art Museum
Nashville, TN
15 March – 27 May 2019


Dorothea Lange (1895–1965) is widely recognized as one of the most important documentary photographers of the twentieth century. She was a prominent advocate of the medium’s power to effect change and used her camera as a political tool to expose what she saw as injustices and inequalities. Lange was also a formidable woman of remarkable vigor and resilience. Having overcome adversity during her childhood in New Jersey, she went on to become a successful portrait photographer of San Francisco’s elite. In 1933, she took her camera to the streets for the first time to document the unemployed people—economically devastated by the Great Depression—she saw from her studio window. Later, she focused her attention on migrant farm laborers and refugees streaming into California from the Dust Bowl states in search of work. During much of this time, Lange worked for the government’s newly established Resettlement Administration (later called the Farm Security Administration), and her photographs were meant to be powerful arguments for federal assistance.

Although Lange’s photographs were taken more than fifty years ago, many of the issues they address remain relevant today: poverty, environmental degradation, treatment of immigrants, the erosion of rural communities, racial discrimination, and women’s rights. They also speak to the continuing role of visual images in shaping public opinion and political positions.

The exhibition encompasses more than 150 objects, including vintage and modern photographs, letters and a video.

Anthony Hernandez: L.A. Landscapes


Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
Kansas City, MO
19 April 2019 - 18 August 2019


For nearly 50 years, Anthony Hernandez has photographed the social landscape of his native Los Angeles. His pictures convey an abiding human concern for issues of class and race as they impact, and are shaped by, urban environments. The exhibition features selections from several bodies of work made between 1978 and 2012, highlighting Hernandez’s mid-to-late career achievements.

Black and white photographs from the series Automotive Landscapes, Public Transit Areas, Public Use Areas, and Public Fishing Areas focus on the everyday activities of people as they negotiate the unforgiving concrete landscapes that dominate Los Angeles, a city reliant on automotive transport.

Large-scale color photographs from the two series Everything and Forever focus on the city’s overlooked, fringe landscapes. Made while Hernandez walked the Los Angeles River basin, Everything transforms drainage ditches and storm drains –“wastelands” rarely seen by car – into somber, geometric abstractions. For Forever, Hernandez adopted the point of view of the homeless, focusing on spare, material traces that mark this way of life. Through Hernandez’s empathetic lens, these pictures emphasize the emotional and psychological impact of living on the streets, giving symbolic weight to the simplest of objects.

Martin Parr’s Only Human

The British Journal of Photography

When the Portrait Gallery was established in London in the mid-19th century, its role was envisioned “to consist of those persons who are most honourably commemorated in British history”. Opening in an era when photography was still a new and untried technology, the National Portrait Gallery (as it later became known) was intended to be the national repository of the images, chiefly paintings and drawings, of those men and, much later, women who represented what was best among the British hierarchy of achievements, skills and aptitudes. Its function was to hold up a mirror to Britain that reflected its qualities back to those who came to observe them, as object lessons about how to aspire to, or more simply respect, the qualities and moral standing of the great and the good.

This conception of the NPG may still be widespread in the public mind, as even Martin Parr thought his work would be an ill-fit for a contemporary exhibition along these lines. “I never thought of myself as a portrait photographer,” he says, “and when I first met Phillip Prodger [NPG’s former head of photographs], I told him I had only a few celebrity portraits. I just put a lightbox together and sent them to him, though I was quite surprised at what I had.” Prodger, however, had other ideas, seeing in Parr the work of a social observer who could also offer a portrait of a nation at a key point in its history. So it is that the NPG put together Only Human, on show from 07 March to 27 May, bringing together some of Parr’s most famous photographs alongside a number of works never exhibited before...

A living legend steps away from photography and then returns with ‘I Know How Furiously Your Heart is Beating


The Washington Post

If you have been following the world of photography over the past 10-plus years, you no doubt have heard of and are familiar with the work of American photographer Alec Soth. A member of the prestigious Magnum Photos cooperative, Soth has published numerous monographs of photography and has exhibited far and wide to high acclaim.

Soth first came to prominence around 2004 after his work (also a book) “Sleeping by the Mississippi” caused waves of excitement among some of the industry’s most prominent gatekeepers at the prestigious Review Santa Fe in 2003, where it took the Santa Fe Prize (now called the Santa Fe Fellowship). He subsequently became a member of the aforementioned world-famous photo cooperative and published more books, including “Niagara” and “Songbook.” Along the way, Soth cemented his place as one of the most important photographers working today.

In addition to publishing books and holding exhibitions of his work, Soth is also known for his engaging online presence through his Instagram handle @littlebrownmushroom. He has also published work through an imprint (http://www.littlebrownmushroom.com/shop/) of the same name (everything at the site’s online store is sold out). Having said all of that, Soth tried to pull back from photography for a spell before his latest book, “I Know How Furiously Your Heart is Beating” came out this year. Elaborating on that point, Soth has said:

“After the publication of my last book about social life in America, Songbook, and a retrospective of my four, large-scale American projects, Gathered Leaves, I went through a long period of rethinking my creative process. For over a year I stopped traveling and photographing people. I barely took any pictures at all.

"When I returned to photography, I wanted to strip the medium down to its primary elements. Rather than trying to make some sort of epic narrative about America, I wanted to simply spend time looking at other people and, hopefully, briefly glimpse their interior life.

"In order to try and access these lives, I made all of the photographs in interior spaces. While these rooms often exist in far-flung places, it’s only to emphasize that these pictures aren’t about any place in particular. Whether a picture is made in Odessa or Minneapolis, my goal was the same: to simply spend time in the presence of another beating heart.”

The resulting work is a compilation of images that are, according to the publisher, “fundamentally about intimate encounters in private rooms.” The book coincides with a host of solo exhibitions at the following venues: Weinstein Hammons, Minneapolis; Sean Kelly Gallery, N.Y.; Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco; and Loock Gallery, Berlin.

The title of Soth’s latest book is taken from the poet Wallace Stevens’s short poem, “Gray Room.”...

News from the World of Photography: March 2019

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Beautiful and Unclichéd Photographs of Japanese Landscapes


AnOther
 

Spanish photographic duo Albarrán Cabrera first travelled to Japan six years ago, and have returned there every year since. Turning their lens to Japan’s landscapes and characters, Anna P Cabrera and Angel Albarrán offer a new perspective on the nation through their images via their choice of subject and innovative method of processing images – the pair incorporate both modern and traditional printing techniques into their practice, with additions such as Japanese paper and gold leaf bringing a distinctive warmth and unique palette to their colour prints...

Debunking the Myths of Robert Capa on D-Day


PetaPixel

I want to give you a brief overview of an investigation that began almost five years ago, led by me but involving the efforts of photojournalist J. Ross Baughman, photo historian Rob McElroy, and ex-infantryman and amateur military historian Charles Herrick.

Our project, in a nutshell, dismantles the 74-year-old myth of Robert Capa’s actions on D-Day, June 6, 1944, and the subsequent fate of his negatives. If you have even a passing familiarity with the history of photojournalism, or simply an awareness of twentieth-century cultural history on both sides of the Atlantic, you’ve surely heard the story; it’s been repeated hundreds, possibly thousands of times:

Robert Capa landed on Omaha Beach with the first wave of assault troops at 0630 on the morning of June 6, 1944 (D-Day), on freelance assignment from LIFE magazine.

He stayed there for 90 minutes, until he either inexplicably ran out of film or his camera jammed...

Rare 19th-century images show China at the dawn of photography


CNN Style
 
Before the arrival of photography, the Western imagination of China was based on paintings, written travelogues and dispatches from a seemingly far-off land. From the 1850s, however, a band of pioneering Western photographers sought to capture the country's landscapes, cities and people, captivating audiences back home and sparking a homegrown photography movement in the process. Among them were the Italian Felice Beato, who arrived in China in the 1850s to document Anglo-French exploits in the Second Opium War, and Scottish photographer John Thompson, whose journey up the Min River offered people in the West a rare look into the country's remote interior.

These are just some of the figures whose work features in a 15,000-strong photo collection amassed by New York antiquarian and collector Stephan Loewentheil. His 19th-century images span street scenes, tradespeople, rural life and architecture, showing -- in unprecedented detail -- everything from blind beggars to camel caravans on the Silk Road...

Patti Smith’s Talismanic Photos from Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera’s Home and Beyond


The New Yorker

In 2012, Patti Smith traveled to Mexico City to speak and perform at La Casa Azul, the former home of the artists Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. While visiting the property, which now serves as a museum, Smith took several black-and-white Polaroid photographs of objects she encountered: a pair of crutches that belonged to Kahlo; her worn corset; a white coverlet with crocheted trim, dangling from a wooden bed frame. Those images are part of a new exhibit of Smith’s photographs, titled “Wing,” which is now on display at the Diego Rivera Gallery, at the San Francisco Art Institute, adjacent to Rivera’s 1931 mural “The Making of a Fresco Showing the Building of a City.”...

Busy living everything with everyone, everywhere, all of the time


The British Journal of Photography

 Since he was first named director of the Maison Européenne de la Photographie, the centre for contemporary arts situated in the heart of Paris’ historic 4th arrondissement, one year ago, Simon Baker – formerly the Tate’s first-ever photography curator – has had to resist the urge to throw open the windows.

“It’s an old hôtel particulier, so it has very grand rooms, but they are essentially domestic spaces,” he says of the exhibition halls perused by the public since 1996. “At the moment I want to leave all the curtains and the windows open. You have this feeling of an opening up of the space.”...

 

The Electric Intimacy of Alice Springs


The Cut

It’s a joy to contemplate the photography of June Newton, a.k.a. Alice Springs. The Australian-born Springs is the 95-year-old widow of the provocative fashion photographer Helmut Newton, but that’s the least interesting thing about her.

Under Springs’s gaze, world-famous actresses like Catherine Deneuve, Charlotte Rampling, and Audrey Hepburn look like people, not icons — conversational, intent, their eyes telegraphing depths beneath. Springs respects their beauty, but doesn’t accept it as a mask. There are shadows beneath Deneuve’s perfect features; Hepburn looks gorgeous, but her age.

Vivid personalities leap from Springs’s portraits, which depict not just her subjects but her dialogue with them. Early on, Springs decided to forgo studio portraits and photograph people on their own territory, peeling back the protective facades that prominent people — especially the famous and beautiful — often construct...

The Extended Moment: Photographs from the National Gallery of Canada

The Morgan Library and Museum
New York, NY
Through 26 May 2019


The Extended Moment brings forth around seventy works that reveal the historical, technological, and aesthetic breadth of the collection, which is little known in this country. In the exhibition’s presentation at the Morgan, works of far-flung origins are placed side-by-side to highlight recurring trends and tensions in the history of the medium. Artists include Edward Burtynsky, Julia Margaret Cameron, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Lynne Cohen, John Herschel, Richard Learoyd, Lisette Model, Gordon Parks, Edward Steichen, and Josef Sudek.


The New Yorker

In 2007, Guy retrieved her pictures from Struth’s storage facility. The occasion was a show at White Columns, the venerable downtown nonprofit space, spotlighting the work of six art dealers who started as artists (one surprising inclusion was the power player Jeffrey Deitch). But it wasn’t until a 2015 solo outing at Cleopatra’s, the side project of a group of enterprising young women with day jobs in New York galleries, that interest in Guy’s work began to intensify. Last year, Hunters Point Press published Guy’s first eponymous monograph, a beautiful, slender book. Until March 9th, you can see Guy’s early work on view at the Upper East Side gallery Higher Pictures...

Polly Penrose Self-Portrait as an Accessory


The Eye of Photography

“My body is a prop.” _ Polly Penrose

Polly Penrose, an English photographer, makes her normal woman’s body (that’s how she defines herself) an accessory in response to a place, usually a home emptied of her residents.

The London photographer began by practicing self-portraits on the sly in houses waiting for new buyers. The procedure was and is still the same.

First, find out about and ask for permission from real estate agencies, painstakingly explaining the purpose of the process, judged in many cases, strange or even disturbing.

Then go on the spot, to impregnate the disused home while being attentive to the residual traces, to the geometry of the banality of the suburban houses.

Finally, perform self-timer snapshots in a handful of seconds, rush, pose hiding her face and, in most cases, achieve a disastrous or unwanted effect, accompanied by hematomas or small accidental injuries...

Mona Kuhn’s Abstraction of Being


The British Journal of Photography

"I wanted to stop time with photography. That's another reason I got into nudes, for the timeless aspect,” says Mona Kuhn, who has just published her sixth book with Steidl

“I got into photography because I’m a little restless, and I liked that it was fast,” says Brazilian photographer Mona Kuhn, who has just published her sixth book with Steidl, She Disappeared Into Complete Silence. Even so, the speed of photography haunted her, as Kuhn feared that her photographs would be consumed then discarded – like so many of the magazines she read and tossed away. “I wanted to stop time with photography,” she says. “That’s another reason I got into nudes, for the timeless aspect.”...

JOEL MEYEROWITZ: Selections from the Series “Aftermath”


The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College
Collegeville, PA
Until 11 May 2019


The people of New York City have always been an inspiration to Bronx-born photographer Joel Meyerowitz. Heavily influenced by the street photography of Robert Frank and Henri Cartier-Bresson, Meyerowitz captured his subjects with a compact 35mm camera. In the 1960s, when he began his investigation into street photography, he was unaware that he would become one of the first advocates of color photography. Now, his vibrantly colored and vividly patterned photographs of New Yorkers are some of his best-known artworks.

Discovering Contemporary Mexico Beyond the Daily Headlines: The Images of Graciela Iturbide


The Washington Post

What are the images that define contemporary Mexico? In the foreign eye, they are pictures of migrant caravans, escaped drug traffickers, beaches conjured by the American imagination.

Joan Didion once wrote of the Mexican state of Durango, “The very name hallucinates.” And so it seems with the country as a whole, a nation distorted in the public imagination for decades, reduced to a convenient caricature. It’s hard not to see the ellipses between that iconography and an American president whose politics hinge on the idea of a lawless Mexico, unpierced by nuance.

Which is why 2019 is the appropriate year for the world to discover Graciela Iturbide, who now has extensive exhibitions in Boston and Mexico City. For a half-century, Iturbide has traveled across her own country with a camera loaded with black-and-white film. She has taken pictures that are often described as dreamlike, surreal or painterly, but those words fall short...

An Unflinching View of Venezuela in Crisis


The New Yorker

Alejandro Cegarra’s photo series “State of Decay” is an unflinching portrait of Venezuela’s collapse. How this country went from being one of Latin America’s richest societies to one of its poorest is a disaster of bewildering proportions, one that defies easy explanation.

Venezuela has the largest proven oil reserves in the world, but since the 2014 crash in world oil prices, on which Venezuela depended for more than ninety percent of its export revenues, its economy has contracted continuously, unleashing an economic crisis worse than that experienced by Americans during the Great Depression.

In the past five years, three million of Venezuela’s thirty-two million people have fled the country. More than half of all Venezuelans lack enough food to meet their daily needs. The country’s hospital system has all but failed; countless Venezuelans have died owing to a lack of medical attention and the scarcity of medicines for treatable illnesses. Hyperinflation is expected to reach ten million percent this year. On top of everything else, Venezuela’s murder rate is among the world’s highest, making it one of the most dangerous countries in the world to live in...

Daido Moriyama: Hasselblad Award Winner 2019


The Hasselblad Foundation

The Hasselblad Foundation is pleased to announce that Japanese photographer Daido Moriyama is the recipient of the 2019 Hasselblad Foundation International Award in Photography for the sum of SEK 1,000,000 (approx. USD 110,000). The award ceremony will take place in Gothenburg, Sweden on October 13, 2019. A symposium will be held on October 14, followed by the opening of an exhibition of Moriyama’s work at the Hasselblad Center, and the release of a new book about the artist, published by Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König.

A Year of Quiet Contemplation Led to the Rebirth of Alec Soth’s Photography


The New York Times LENS Blog

After meditating during a flight to Helsinki, Alec Soth took a walk, sat down by a lake, and had an experience that could only be described as transcendental.

“It’s goofy talking about such a thing, but there were tears running down my face, the whole package,” he said. “Afterwards, walking back to my hotel, every time I saw someone I was like, ‘I love that person.’ It was probably not unlike what people experience on LSD.”

The experience in 2016, he said, changed the way he saw the world and, by extension, how he viewed his creative life. Mr. Soth had been a successful photographer for more than a decade. He had first drawn wide acclaim after his 2004 book, “Sleeping by the Mississippi,” and built a reputation as a skilled chronicler of American life in the tradition of photographers like Walker Evans and Robert Frank. He was, as the New York Times critic Hilarie M. Sheets once noted, especially adept at “finding chemistry with strangers,” particularly “loners and dreamers” he met in his travels...

Through a New Lens


What Will You Remember?

Whether or not you are fighting winter doldrums, here is a little show with big heart that’s sure to lift your spirits. It highlights a transformative slice of photographic history, the period following WWII. Feeling both relief and elation at having survived the war, unfettered European photographers invented an exuberant new genre that celebrated daily life. “Postwar Visions: European Photography, 1945-60” sheds light on this enduring burst of innovation at the MFA, Boston through June 23rd, 2019.

The horrors of war saw a robust backlash of humanism in the arts. For photography, the movement started in Germany with Otto Steinert, a former physician who created the collective known as “Subjektive Fotografie” (Subjective Photography). The group sought to elevate the ordinary and bring a sense of awe to the banal. This brought photography into the realm of abstraction, directly building upon tenets developed before the war at the Bauhaus, Germany’s legendary school of art, architecture and design founded by Walter Gropius a century ago in 1919 and shuttered by the Nazi regime just fourteen years later in 1933...

Beyond Truth: Photography After the Shutter


The Cleveland Museum of Art
Cleveland, OH
Through 26 May 2019


Just how truthful is photography? Despite the ability to manipulate selfies on our cell phones, many of us cling to the illusion that the medium has an inherent connection to truth. Even if a camera produces an accurate recording of a scene in front of the lens, many changes can be wrought during the transition from captured light to printed image. Beyond Truth explores figurative scenes and portraits in which artists have altered the “truth” through postproduction techniques ranging from composite printing, multiple exposures, and handwork on negatives and prints to digital capture and manipulation.

The exhibition, which includes photographs from the Akron Art Museum and the Fred and Laura Ruth Bidwell Collection, is drawn largely from the Cleveland Museum of Art’s holdings. The show marks the debut of 13 works owned by the museum, 7 of which are recent acquisitions. Among those are a 1936 retelling of the Narcissus myth by French photographer Laure Albin Guillot and a “portrait” by Trevor Paglen that was produced in 2017 not with a camera but by an Artificial Intelligence.

Ralph Eugene Meatyard: Stages for Being


Bates College Museum of Art
Lewiston, ME
25 October 2019 – 28 March 2020


Ralph Eugene Meatyard (1925–1972) moved to Lexington, Kentucky in 1950 and developed a passion for photography along with a career as an optician. Over the next two decades, he created the enigmatic images that would secure his place in the history of the medium by consciously challenging the concept of the camera as a mere recorder of the world. Meatyard’s photographs are seldom seen in Maine. Stages for Being celebrates his legacy with over eighty vintage prints chosen to explore his innovative practice of staging photographs.

Spotlight: Gabriel Figueroa and the Knotty the Aesthetics of the Female Body


AI-AP

Gabriel Figueroa’s series “Nodum” is a study in landscapes.
The project matches the landscapes of the female body with the desert landscape of Cuatro Ciénegas in the State of Coahuila
northen Mexico — one of the few places in the world, Figueroa notes, “to have gypsum dunes, warm pools in the middle of the desert and a marble quarry.” The work was also inspired and influenced by pre-Raphaelite paintings and the Japanese art of rope binding called shibari, as well as other icons from photography and paintings.

“However, as in all creative processes, this project followed its own evolutionary path and the resulting images are the consequence of an organic and spontaneous creative flow,” notes the photographer.

“In this manner, different implicit lines of work can be identified throughout these images,” he writes in his artist’s statement. “On one side, the fantasy of the nude female body, enveloped by the embrace of intricate knots; that surround it and invigorate the eroticism in an open-air setting. On the other hand, the quiet stillness of the landscape echoes the silent submission implicit in the bindings. Yet there are other elements that can be observed: the vestige, the marks, the ephemeral scar, the kiss of the rope as a symbolic element of the interventions on the human body and on the desertic landscape.”...

Portrait of Humanity: The Anonymous Project is restoring our collective memory, one colour slide at a time


The British Journal of Photography

Founded in 2017, the project has already rescued 700,000 colour slides, which tell the story ‘of all our lives’

When filmmaker Lee Shulman bought a box of vintage slides from
Ebay, he was hoping for some blurry snaps to flick through on a Sunday afternoon, and maybe a picture or two to keep. But when they arrived, ‘I nearly fell off my seat.’  What he saw amazed him: here were hundreds of snapshots of strangers’ lives. The poses were instantly recognisable: children grinning over birthday cakes, couples squinting on the beach – the simple magic of unstaged life, captured in rich Kodachrome colour.

The price of
colour
photography plummeted in the early Fifties, allowing people to snap away with newfound freedom. But the chemicals that produce the slides fade over time. If the photos were to disappear, then with them so would the memories of our collective human experience – and Shulman didn’t want to let that happen...

Untroubled Irving Glenn


MINA Image Centre
Beirut, Lebanon
16 January - 28 April 2019

 
Irving Penn (1917-2009), recognized as one of the masters of photography of the twentieth century, is widely admired for his iconic images of high fashion and for the remarkable portraits of the artists, writers, and celebrities who defined the cultural landscapes of his time. 

Drawing inspiration from Resonance, an exhibition organized by the Pinault Collection in 2014 at the Palazzo Grassi in Venice, the exhibition Untroubled seeks first and foremost to pay tribute to the photographer’s unique legacy.

The exhibition presents the photographs not in a linear, chronological sequence but arranged in a manner that brings out their subliminal affinities. Commercial projects cohabit with ethnographic studies, discarded refuse with sophisticated models, cultural celebrities with animal skulls. 

As Penn remarked, “It is all one thing”.

New Southern Photography


Ogden Museum of Southern Art
New Orleans, LA
6 October 2018 - 10 March 2019


New Southern Photography highlights the exciting and diverse breadth of photography being practiced in the American South today. The largest photography exhibition at the Ogden Museum to date, this exhibition features the work of twenty-five emerging, mid-career and established photographers. Each photographer is individually showcased with a monographic installation focusing on a single body of work within the context of a group exhibition. All types of lens-formed imagery are included from traditional analog and digital still photography to video installation and new media. New Southern Photography is available for travel to other institutions through 2021.

New Southern Photography explores the role photography plays in formulating the visual iconography of the modern New South. Regional identity in an interconnected and global world is central to the exhibition’s narrative. Themes and ideas addressed in New Southern Photography
include: memory, the experience of place in the American South, cultural mythology and reality, deep familial connections to the land, the tension between the past and present, and the transitory nature of change in the New South.

The goal of New Southern Photography is to create a space for conversation about the region. This exhibition not only highlights recent contributions the American South has made to the world through
photography, but serves as a platform to broaden the understanding and appreciation of this complicated, contested and often misunderstood region. New Southern Photography follows in the rich tradition of Southern literature, where storytelling is paramount.

Then They Came for Me: Incarceration of Japanese Americans During WWII and the Demise of Civil Liberties


The Eye of Photography

 Then They Came for Me: Incarceration of Japanese Americans during WWII and the Demise of Civil Liberties examines the terrifying period in U.S. history when the government scapegoated and imprisoned thousands of people of Japanese ancestry. This multimedia exhibition draws parallels to tactics chillingly resurgent today featuring imagery by noted American photographers Dorothea Lange and Ansel Adams, alongside works by incarcerated Japanese American artists Toyo Miyatake and Miné Okubo.

Presented by the Jonathan Logan Family Foundation in partnership with the National Japanese American Historical Society and J-Sei, the exhibition tells the story of the forced removal of 120,000 Japanese American citizens and legal residents from their homes during World War II without due process or other constitutional protections.

 

‘I Ranged Far and Wide’: Dawoud Bey on Imagining the Paths of Fugitive Slaves

ARTNEWS

When Chicago-based artist Dawoud Bey traveled to the outskirts of Cleveland in late 2017, he found a landscape largely unchanged since thousands of slaves had crossed it 200 years ago, seeking freedom in the north. There were no telephone lines or cell towers, just the scraggly brush that had made the passage so treacherous. “I ranged far and wide out there, since there were expansive rural landscapes that looked as they might have in the 18th and 19th centuries,” Bey said recently in an extensive email interview. “The landscape and history there has not been built over.”

Bey was at work on his series of black-and-white silver gelatin photographs, “Night Coming Tenderly, Black,” commissioned by Front International: Cleveland Triennial for Contemporary Art and now on view at the Art Institute of Chicago. The exhibition caps off an eventful couple of years for Bey that kicked off with his winning a coveted MacArthur “Genius” grant in fall 2017. Last summer, Front premiered “Night Coming Tenderly, Black” in Cleveland’s St. John’s Episcopal Church, once a stop on the Underground Railroad. Then September brought the publication of “Seeing Deeply,” a 400-page monograph from the University of Texas Press, as well as the opening of an exhibition at the National Gallery in Washington, DC, of his “Birmingham Project” photographs. (That show is up through March 24) In 2020 the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art will give Bey a full retrospective...

Graciela Iturbide’s Photos of Mexico Make ‘Visible What, to Many, Is Invisible’

The New York Times LENS Blog

Graciela Iturbide may be one of the most renowned photographers working today. Five decades into her journey with a camera, her work, most famously in indigenous communities in her native Mexico, has achieved that rare trifecta — admired by critics, revered by fellow photographers and adored by the public. She continues to travel, photograph and exhibit all over the world.

But it is becoming impossible to discuss her work without mentioning the Zapotec woman wearing live iguanas on her head. 

Ms. Iturbide made the photo after happening upon Zobeida Díaz at a farmer’s market while living with the Juchitán of southeastern Oaxaca in 1979. It took several tries — the iguanas kept moving around, falling off, reducing her subject to laughter — but on her contact sheet, Ms. Iturbide found her “Nuestra Señora de las Iguanas (Our Lady of the Iguanas),” an image so arresting that 40 years later, its popularity is still growing...


The British Journal of Photography
 

The World Press Photo Foundation has announced the six talents from North and Central America in its ongoing 6×6 Global Talent Program. Aimed at picking out under-recognized visual story-tellers from around the world, the 6×6 programme is now on its fifth region, out of the six identified around the world. This time, the talents picked out were: Dylan Hausthor, USA; Ian Willms, Canada; Mariceu Erthal García, Mexico; Nydia Blas, USA; Tomas Ayuso, Honduras; and Yael Esteban Martínez Velázquez, Mexico...

Over 6,000 Ottoman-Era Photographs Now Available Online


Hyperallergic

The Getty Research Institute has recently digitized over 6,000 19th- and early 20th-century Ottoman-era photographs, collected in the 1980s by French collector Pierre de Gigord during his travels through Turkey. The collection is now available to study and download for free online.

The photos encompass various walks of Ottoman life, depicting “landmark architecture, urban and natural landscapes, archeological sites of millennia-old civilizations, and the bustling life of the diverse people who lived over 100 years ago in the last decades of the waning Ottoman Empire,” according to the Iris, the Getty Research Institute’s blog.

The collection includes a 10-part panorama of Constantinople, which required stitching separate prints together to create a panoramic view of the Istanbul skyline in 1878. The shots can now be viewed in their entirety on a single screen. 82 glass plate negatives were digitized, along with 60 photographic albums documenting scenes of Ottoman life. Each individual image in the albums was photographed and digitized, allowing viewers to see up-close details alongside the calligraphic image captions...

Ansel Adams in Our Time


Museum of Fine Arts Boston
Boston, MA
13 December 2018 – 24 February 2019


Ansel Adams in Our Time traces the iconic visual legacy of Ansel Adams (1902–1984), presenting some of his most celebrated prints, from a symphonic view of snow-dusted peaks in The Tetons and Snake River, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming (1942) to an aerial shot of a knotted roadway in Freeway Interchange, Los Angeles (1967). The exhibition looks both backward and forward in time: his black-and-white photographs are displayed alongside prints by several of the 19th-century government survey photographers who greatly influenced Adams, as well as work by contemporary artists whose modern-day concerns centered on the environment, land rights, and the use and misuse of natural resources point directly to Adams’ legacy.

Adams’ stunning images were last on view at the MFA in a major exhibition in 2005; this new, even larger presentation places his work in the context of the 21st century, with all that implies about the role photography has played—and continues to play—in our changing perceptions of the land. The Adams photographs in the exhibition are drawn from the Lane Collection, one of the largest and most significant gifts in MFA history.

Telfair Museums Receives Donation of Works by American Photographer Bruce Davidson


Telfair Museums
Savannah, GA

Telfair Museums announced the acquisition of 347 photographs by photographer Bruce Davidson (American, B. 1933). This anonymous gift is a transformational addition to the museum’s permanent collection by a world-renowned photographer whose work is in significant museum collections across the world, including at the Art Institute of Chicago, the National Gallery of Art, and MoMA, among others.

The collection spans Davidson’s career from 1956 to 2008 and includes images from his most well-known series including Circus (1958), Brooklyn Gang (1959), Time of Change (1961-1965), East 100th Street (1970), a study of poverty and discrimination in Harlem, and Subway (1980), an essay on a particular American subculture.

Davidson is a prolific photographer recognized for his humanistic portrayals of all walks of life. Erin Dunn, Assistant Curator at Telfair Museums has curated Telfair’s photography collection since 2014 and says, “History and human nature are deftly revealed through the empathetic eye of Bruce Davidson. This momentous gift not only allows us to revel in the individual photographs of Davidson, but to appreciate his entire career’s worth of noteworthy subjects and imagery. The photographs stand on their own, but will also complement themes and subject matters already evident in Telfair Museums’ permanent collection.”

Photography plays a prominent role in Telfair’s robust schedule of annual exhibitions, and in recent years the museum has also traveled photography exhibitions drawn from its permanent collection to museums in New York, California, Texas, Florida, and Wisconsin. “It is difficult to overstate the impact that this gift will have on Telfair’s photography collection,” says Courtney McNeil, Chief Curator & Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs at Telfair Museums. “The foundation of the museum’s photography collection is one of the country’s largest collections of work by New York street photographer Helen Levitt, and Davidson’s work has many rich thematic parallels to that body of work.”

A Hundred Heroines: female photographers in the spotlight


The Guardian

Following a campaign by the Royal Photographic Society to highlight modern female photographers in a male-dominated profession, a list of a Hundred Heroines was announced on 14 December, 100 years since British women first voted in a general election...

The First Photograph


Harry Ransom Center
The University of Texas at Austin

After developing heliography and the First Photograph, Niépce traveled to England where he showed his invention to botanical illustrator Francis Bauer at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Bauer recognized the importance of Niépce's work and encouraged him to write about his invention for a presentation to the Royal Society. Although his proposal was rejected, Niépce left his handwritten memoir and his heliograph specimens (including the First Photograph) with Bauer, who dutifully inscribed the gifts, labeled them 1827 (the year of their presentation to him), and set them aside.

During the nineteenth century, the First Photograph passed from Bauer's estate through a variety of hands. After its last public exhibition in 1905, it slipped into obscurity. In 1952, photo-historians Helmut and Alison Gernsheim were able to locate the First Photograph when they were contacted by the widow of Gibbon Pritchard, who had found the Niépce heliograph in her husband's estate after his death. The Gernsheims verified the photograph's authenticity, and obtained it for their collection.

News from the World of Photography: December 2018

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Unearthing Photography’s Time Capsule


The New York Times

In March of 1985, the photographer Robert Frank arrived with a paper sack at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston to use Polaroid’s 20-by-24-inch camera. It was a hulking beast of an apparatus, worlds away from the diminutive 35-millimeter Leica that had freed him to roam the country while shooting “The Americans,” the 1959 book of photos that crowned him a king of counterculture and the most imitated photographer alive today.

He emptied the bag of salvaged miscellany he’d brought to shoot, jotted a few cryptic words on bits of paper, and then pinned them together with old photos and other ephemera onto timeworn corkboards. In the resulting six-paneled work — “Boston, March 20, 1985” we see the corkboards arranged in grids like signs at an old grocer’s. Few clues reveal Frank’s intentions, but we know that his fellow trailblazing photographers, Robert Heinecken, Dave Heath and John Wood, were somehow involved: The images show scrawled dedications to them.

The four renowned artists were brought together by two photographic historians, Susan E. Cohen and William S. Johnson, who pulled off a curatorial feat that would be unimaginable today. They persuaded Mr. Frank, Mr. Heinecken, Mr. Heath and Mr. Wood to collaborate with them on a project whose contours were hazy at best. And then they persuaded the Polaroid Corporation to finance it...

On View: The Extraordinary Lives and Work of Martine Franck and Inge Morath
 

ProPhoto Daily


“Martine, I want to come and see your contact sheets.”

That was what Henri Cartier-Bresson said when he first met Martin Franck in 1966. The two were married in 1970 (despite a 30-year age difference) and shared a passion for photography. But Franck’s own career as a photographer was overshadowed by that of her husband, one of the founders of the Magnum photo collective. Franck admits she put her husband’s career ahead of her own. It wasn’t always easy.

“A painful example comes from the year in which they were
married, when the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London sent out invitations to what was to be Franck’s first solo exhibition which highlighted her husband’s name and his presence at the launch. She promptly cancelled the show,” notes AnOther.

Now an exhibition at the 
Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson (through Feb. 10, 2019) shines an overdue spotlight on Franck’s work. The retrospective of 140 images serves also as a debut for the Fondation’s new and expanded space in Paris’s Marais district.

Meanwhile, the work and extraordinary life of pioneering Magnum photographer Inge Morath is celebrated in the new book Inge Morath: An Illustrated Biography...

Beyond the Myth of the War Photographer


The New York Times LENS


The myth of the war photographer is hard to dispel. Infused with machismo, the Hollywood archetype is the hard-living, scarf-wearing loner dashing from one war zone to the next, with romantic partners as expendable as bullets. But clichés ignore the doubts, fears and moral quandaries as well as the loneliness and pain that shadow those who document the depths of human depravity. Such emotional whiplash creates that other cliché — of the tragic, fallen heroes (or heroines) broken by the horrors they’ve witnessed.

The reality of the war photographer is, of course, far more nuanced...

A New Photographic Place Has Just Opened in Paris: La Comète!


The Eye of Photography

La Comète, Books & Photography is a library-gallery opened by PICTO lab.

Like a tribute to his grandfather Pierre Gassmann, mythical figure of French photography in the second half of the 20th century, Philippe Gassmann, current CEO of the PICTO group, chose to call this new venue La Comète, in memory of the first PICTO lab in La Comète street in Paris in the early 1950s.

La Comète is at 29 rue des Récollets in the 10th arrondissement of Paris. For PICTO it is a question of creating a kind of agora where professionals and amateurs will find different services to their needs … Thus, on the first floor of the bookstore is a new fine art photo workshop, where photographers and amateurs can find two forms of services: access to high definition and self-service quality scanners, and assisted inkjet printing with the lab’s expert board.

The artistic direction of La Comète is carried out by The Eyes, in the continuity of its expertise in the field of photo editing. It is a question of stimulating programming of installations, meetings, and workshops in the service of photographers and passionate about images.

Brassaï

SFMOMA
San Francisco, CA
17 November 2018 - 17 February 2019

 

Best known for his provocative and enigmatic images of Parisian life between the two world wars, the photographer Brassaï (born Gyula Halász) is one of the most prominent figures of twentieth-century photography. Called “the eye of Paris” by his friend Henry Miller, Brassaï’s work both celebrates and reveals the complexities and hidden sides of French society and culture.

This thematic survey of his career focuses on his celebrated depictions of 1930s Paris, where he photographed lovers, prostitutes, workers, and gatherings in cafés, bars, and dance halls with an intimate candor that’s still striking today. The exhibition also includes powerful portraits of his artist friends—Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dalí, and Henri Matisse, among others—and the city’s creative avant-garde. Brassaï brings together outstanding prints of the artist’s best work along with many never-before-seen photographs.

Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940–1950


The National Gallery of Art
Washington DC
4 November 2018 - 18 February 2019


 During the 1940s American photographer Gordon Parks (1912–2006) grew from a self-taught photographer making portraits and documenting everyday life in Saint Paul and Chicago to a visionary professional shooting for Ebony, Vogue, Fortune, and Life. For the first time, the formative decade of Parks’s 60-year career is the focus of an exhibition, which brings together 150 photographs and ephemera—including magazines, books, letters, and family pictures. The exhibition will illustrate how Parks’s early experiences at the Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information, and Standard Oil (New Jersey) as well as his close relationships with Roy Stryker, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and Ralph Ellison, helped shape his groundbreaking style. A fully illustrated catalog, with extensive new research and previously unpublished images, will accompany the exhibition.
 

Leonard Freed: Worldview


Jewish Museum of Belgium
Bruxelles, Belgium
18 October 2018 - 17 March 2019


Leonard Freed (1929-2006) is one of the most important reporters of the twentieth century. His photographs taken in the United States, Europe and the Middle East have made the front pages of many newspapers. Member of the famous Magnum agency, he is part of the great tradition of photographic reporting. Freed is one of the most famous representatives of concerned photography.

The retrospective, created by the Musée de l'Elysée in collaboration with Magnum Photos, Paris and the Fotomuseum in The Hague, traces the career of a man who lives by and for photography. In addressing the major events of the past fifty years - including the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the civil rights movement in the United States, post-war Germany and the Romanian revolution - Freed takes a penetrating and caring look at individuals inseparable from their environment. 

Nobuyoshi Araki: Integral Photo Lesson


The Eye of Photography

“Photograph with kindness, look with kindness, light with kindness”

For the first time, in these interviews where he comments one after the other 336 photographs covering his work from 1963 to 2010, the most famous contemporary Japanese photographer, Nobuyoshi Araki, tells his conception of his work and his many influences, from Eugène Atget to Yousuf Karsh or Robert Frank.

For Araki, “to live is to photograph”. In an approach that will pave the way for Nan Goldin and Sophie Calle, he claims the notion of photographic autofiction and documents his life often in its most intimate aspects such as his honeymoon or the untimely death of his wife.

For him  “documentary is a series of looks, followed by a discovery and an emotion” he reveals that “there is always an emotional connection” with his subject. “Taking photos is a face-to-face”.

Through a series of anecdotes mixing a lot of fun, a disarming frankness and an often poignant emotion, the artist remembers with remarkable precision the circumstances surrounding the taking of his photos. Inventor of the word “Erotos”, he says that the meeting of Eros and Thanatos has been his main focus all his life, since his children’s games in the prostitutes cemetery of Yoshiwara...


International Center of Photography
Caixa Forum Lleida
Lleida, Spain
27 September 2018 – 27 January 2019

 

This exhibition presents Robert Capa’'s color work for the first time. Capa regularly used color film from the 1940s until his death in 1954. Some of these photographs were published in magazines of the day, but the majority have never been printed, seen, or even studied. Over the years, this aspect of Capa’s career has virtually been forgotten. With over 100 contemporary color prints by the famous photojournalist, Capa in Color presents this work an integral part of his post-war career and fundamental in remaining relevant to magazines.

Capa in Color will explore how he started to see anew with color film and how his work adapted to a new postwar sensibility. The new medium required him to readjust to color compositions, but also to a postwar audience, interested in being entertained and transported to new places.

The exhibition is drawn entirely from the Robert Capa Archive in ICP’s permanent collection. The Archive contains roughly 4,200 color transparencies - 35mm Kodachrome, 21⁄4 Ektachrome, and some larger Kodachrome sheet film. It also includes thousands of vintage black-and-white prints, negatives, tearsheets, and papers.

Ansel Adams in Our Time


Museum of Fine Arts Boston
Boston, MA
13 December 2018 – 24 February 2019


Ansel Adams in Our Time traces the iconic visual legacy of Ansel Adams (1902–1984), presenting some of his most celebrated prints, from a symphonic view of snow-dusted peaks in The Tetons and Snake River, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming (1942) to an aerial shot of a knotted roadway in Freeway Interchange, Los Angeles (1967). The exhibition looks both backward and forward in time: his black-and-white photographs are displayed alongside prints by several of the 19th-century government survey photographers who greatly influenced Adams, as well as work by contemporary artists whose modern-day concerns centered on the environment, land rights, and the use and misuse of natural resources point directly to Adams’ legacy.

Adams’ stunning images were last on view at the MFA in a major exhibition in 2005; this new, even larger presentation places his work in the context of the 21st century, with all that implies about the role photography has played—and continues to play—in our changing perceptions of the land. The Adams photographs in the exhibition are drawn from the Lane Collection, one of the largest and most significant gifts in MFA history.

News from the World of Photography: November 2018

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Guns and poses: Deutsche Börse photography prize shortlist revealed


The Guardian

This year’s Deutsche Borse photography prize shortlist is a considered choice of four artists whose approaches draw on documentary, archival appropriation and conceptualism. They are: Susan Meiselas for her retrospective exhibition, Mediations; Laia Abril for her deeply-researched book, On Abortion; Arwed Messmer for his archival exhibition, RAF: No Evidence and Mark Ruwedel for his show, The Artist and Society.

This photographer wanted to humanize Ellis Island’s immigrants. His images are still powerful.


The Washington Post
 
To the new arrivals at Ellis Island in the early 1900s, the thin bespectacled man waving them down seemed to be a part of the immigration process.

They had spent weeks crossing the Atlantic Ocean in hopes of becoming Americans, and now that they had disembarked from the crowded ships, they hoped there were only a few steps remaining.

After being herded into an immense brick building, the crowds of newcomers were directed this way and that, told to sit, stand, open their luggage and, for a select few, found themselves cornered by Lewis Hine, a man toting a heavy, boxlike camera on a rickety tripod.

Usually, Hine did not speak their language. He motioned to them what he wanted to do. They waited anxiously while he set up the camera, and then the machine emitted a resounding bang. Sparks flew. Thick smoke filled the air. When it cleared, the immigrants were sent on to the next step — likely never knowing they had just become a part of one man’s project to make the country more welcoming toward them...

Roger Fenton's Photographs of the Crimea


The Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace
London, UK
Until 28 April 2019

 

This is the first exhibition to focus exclusively on Roger Fenton's pioneering photographs of the Crimean War, taken in 1855. Fenton was already an accomplished and respected photographer when he was sent by the publishers Agnew's to photograph a war that pitched Britain, France and Turkey as allies against Russia.  Arriving several months after the major battles were fought in 1854, Fenton focused on creating moving portraits of the troops, as well as capturing the stark, empty battlefields on which so many lost their lives. 

Published in contemporary newspaper reports, Fenton's photographs showed the impact of war to the general public for the first time.  Through his often subtle and poetic interpretations Fenton created the genre of war photography, showing his extraordinary genius in capturing the futility of war.

Time Travel Back to 1970s L.A. with These Vintage Photos


Los Angeles Magazine

 Thinking of ’70s L.A. now probably brings to mind the golden days of Laurel Canyon, antics on the Sunset Strip, or maybe a few New Age cults. But a new group show at Joseph Bellows Gallery peels away some of those layers of nostalgia to show images of how the region looked to photographers as they lived it.

Work in the show comes from photographers Bevan Davies, Philip Melnick, John Humble, Grant Mudford, Terry Wild, and Ave Pildas. The images selected from each artist capture small moments of how the city looked at the time. Some of the locations are still recognizable now, others have evolved more visibly in the ensuing decades...

 

Arbus, Untitled and Unearthly


The New York Times

Beginning in 1969 and continuing through the last two years of her life, Diane Arbus traveled regularly by bus to New Jersey to photograph people at residences for the developmentally and intellectually disabled. Her first destination, the coeducational Woodbridge State School, was just across the Hudson from her Manhattan apartment. Quite soon, though, she determined that an all-female institution in Vineland, in the southern part of the state, provided richer opportunities.

The photographs in the “Untitled” series, at the David Zwirner gallery through Dec. 15, are mostly taken in Vineland. Departing significantly from the work that built Arbus's reputation, they include some of the most mysterious and haunting pictures of her 15-year artistic career.

The “Untitled” exhibition is the first in Zwirner’s new partnership with the Fraenkel Gallery of San Francisco to co-represent the Arbus estate. Rather than start with her iconic portraits of sideshow freaks, cross-dressers, pro-Vietnam war demonstrators and nudists, the New York gallery opted to show this less familiar, late work, which until now has never been seen in its entirety...

V&A's impressive new Photography Centre opens with major commissions and month-long photography spotlight


Creative Boom

The world’s first photographic experiments and earliest cameras; works by pioneering female photographers, Julia Margaret Cameron, Agnes Warburg, Madame Yevonde and Cindy Sherman; pictures by 20th-century greats Alfred Stieglitz, Walker Evans, Berenice Abbott, Brassaï, Cecil Beaton and Irving Penn, and contemporary works by Martin Parr, Sian Bonnell, Mary McCartney, Peter Funch, Cornelia Parker and Hiroshi Sugimoto.

This is just some of what to expect at the V&A’s impressive new Photography Centre, which spans four new galleries, more than doubling the museum’s space dedicated to photography...


The New York Times

Quentin Bajac, the chief curator of photography at the Museum of Modern Art, will return to his native Paris to become director of the Jeu de Paume, France’s national photography museum.

Mr. Bajac has served as MoMA’s photography chief since January 2013, only the fifth person to hold the post since its creation in 1940. In New York, he organized a large retrospective of the American photographer Stephen Shore, as well as a century-spanning history of studio photography and an edition of MoMA’s “New Photography” series. He also was co-curator of an acclaimed revisionist presentation of MoMA’s permanent collection at the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris in 2017.

Before coming to MoMA, Mr. Bajac served as a photography curator at the Musée d’Orsay in Paris, then as chief curator of photography at the Centre Georges Pompidou.

Louis Stettner: Traveling Light


SF MOMA
San Francisco, CA
27 October 2018 - 27 May 2019 


Over the course of his eight-decade career, Louis Stettner created a singular approach to photographing everyday life. Born in Brooklyn in 1922, Stettner began working as a photographer in the 1930s and served in the U.S. Army in World War II before moving to Paris in 1947. There, he studied at the Institut des Hautes Études Cinématographiques, became friends with the influential photographer Brassaï (whose work will be on view on Floor 3 from November 17, 2018–February 18, 2019), and developed a unique point of view that melded the boldness of American street photography with the softer humanism more characteristic of his Paris contemporaries. For the rest of his life, he traveled between New York and Paris — his “two loves,” as he called them — constantly finding new inspiration in that geographical duality. From thoughtful images of rush-hour commuters to tranquil observations of daily routines, this thematic retrospective displays the remarkable breadth of Stettner’s work.

A New Home for the Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson in Paris


The New York Times

Henri Cartier-Bresson was a photojournalism pioneer, a man whose wartime images of Europe and portraits of personalities like Albert Camus and Samuel Beckett have become 20th-century classics.

Yet he never allowed himself to be photographed, and he never appeared on television.

“It meant that his face wasn’t widely
recognizable, and that he could blend in everywhere he went, without people knowing it was him,” said Agnès Sire, artistic director of the Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson in Paris, which was established in 2003.

One of his only known self-portraits, taken on a trip to Siena, Italy, is a view of his extended right leg, in trousers, with a winding road in the background. The so-called self-portrait was taken “as he was lying on a wall,” Ms. Sire said.

“The subject is completely banal: That’s what’s interesting about it,” she continued. “It’s a private moment — not a moment where you’re posing for a double-page spread in Paris Match magazine.”

The Siena picture is one of about 50,000 original prints that have moved from Montparnasse, on the Left Bank of Paris, to the foundation’s new and bigger home on the Right Bank, in the fashionable Marais district. More than 200,000 negatives and contact sheets have also been relocated...

Contact Warhol: Photography Without End


Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University
Stanford, CA
29 September 2018 - 6 January 2019

 

Photographs by Andy Warhol that have never before been displayed publicly are at the heart of the exhibition Contact Warhol: Photography Without End, which draws on a trove of over 130,000 photographic exposures that the Cantor Arts Center acquired from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts in 2014. The collection of 3,600 contact sheets and corresponding negatives represent the complete range of Warhol’s black-and-white photographic practice from 1976 until his unexpected death in 1987.

The exhibition brings to life Warhol’s many interactions with the social and celebrity elite of his time with portraits of stars such as Michael Jackson, Liza Minnelli, and Dolly Parton; younger sensations in the art world such as Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat; and political stars, including Nancy Reagan, Maria Shriver, and Arnold Schwarzenegger. Contact Warhol, curated by Stanford Professors Richard Meyer and Peggy Phelan, traces Warhol’s photography from the most fundamental level of the contact sheet to the most fully developed silkscreen paintings. 

Terror in focus: the Jewish photographer who captured the rise of Nazism


The Guardian

In 1920, Roman Vishniac and his new bride Luta arrived in Berlin. Having fled the turmoil of post-revolutionary Moscow, the couple had hastily been married by a station master in a Latvian border town, before traveling to Riga and on to the German capital. There, Vishniac was reunited with his wealthy parents, who had left Russia three years earlier, and he and Luta were married again in a register office before their union was blessed by a traditional Jewish ceremony. So began their new life in a city that an excited Vishniac described as “a living whole … the centre of western Europe”.

The story of their flight is emblematic of Vishniac’s extraordinary life, which was lived out, in part, against Europe’s turbulent early-to-mid 20th-century history. As a child he had experimented with scientific photography, attaching a microscope to a camera in order to produce magnified images of insects and plants. Having gone on to train as a biologist, he found work hard to come by in Berlin. Intrigued by the cosmopolitan nature of the city, he became a keen amateur photographer, strolling the city night and day with a Rolleiflex camera dangling from his neck...

A National Gallery show examines Gordon Parks’s early years


The Washington Post 


He was the youngest of his father’s 15 children. He wrote in his high school yearbook that he wanted to be “a general or a Jazz Sheik.”

Gordon Parks fell short of those goals, but in the process of failing, he became a poet, novelist and memoirist; the inventor of a new genre of film; a pianist, composer and librettist; and one of the greatest photographers of the 20th century. How did this happen?

If you love an artist’s mature work, his or her early work is almost always riveting. The drama is innate: How did it come to be? What were the breakthroughs? Who and what helped? What explains it?

“Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940-1950,” at the National Gallery of Art, sets out to answer these questions. But just as Parks himself got diverted on his way to becoming a “Jazz Sheik,” the curator, Philip Brookman, gets waylaid, and instead of rooting around in juvenilia, finds himself presenting a show with the force and cogency of a full-blown retrospective...


The New York Times Magazine

Robert Adams’s succinct preface to his 2010 book of photographs “What Can We Believe Where?” begins with uplift: “In common with many photographers,” he writes, “I began making pictures because I wanted to record what supports hope: the untranslatable mystery and beauty of the world.” Adams’s aim was true. Look at one of his photographs and you’ll see a record of mystery and beauty. The photographic elements are simple. Bright sunlight, generally; crisp shadow; the occasional moody nocturne. We feel as if we are being taught to see with a visual primer. Better yet, turn the pages of one of his books (he has made more than 50) or walk around an exhibition of his work, inhabiting the flow of his decisions. You are likely to feel your breath getting calmer and your senses quietened...

The Eye of Photography
 
“In the heart of the Sudan, and to the west of the White Nile, there is a strange and unreal land which the hand of time has hardly touched in passing.” – George Rodger

From 1939-47 Magnum photographer George Rodger covered some of the most violent atrocities of the second world war: from the brutality of the Burma campaign to horrific piles of corpses at the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp.

In 1948, in search of something less barbaric, Rodger arranged to document indigenous people of the Nuba mountains, in the former central Sudanese province of Kordofan, and the Latuka and other tribes of southern Sudan. In doing so, he created some of the most historically important and influential images taken in sub-Saharan Africa during the twentieth century.

Southern Sudan is released to coincide with an exhibition of the same name at David Hill Gallery, London, opening on 2nd November until 25th January.

‘George Rodger belongs to the great tradition of explorers and adventurers. His work is a moving testimony through time and space.’ Henri Cartier-Bresson

Hyperallergic

Time may just be an illusion, yet humans have the need to mark time in order to make sense of our lives. In "Time Frames: Contemporary East Asian Photography" at the Baltimore Museum of Art, works by contemporary East Asian photographers explore time through both subject matter and creative processes, as the artists grapple with their cultural and personal histories.

The exhibition highlights around 40 photographic works by Asian American artists and artists from Vietnam, Korea, Japan, and China that are rarely seen in the US. The photographs represent five ways that the featured artists have engaged with the concept of time: through individual and collective experience, reflection, duration and labor, progress and place, and displacement...

The British Journal of Photography

So far the wildfires in California have claimed the lives of 94 people and laid waste to 1,667,855 acres of land this year. And, according to Dutch paper NRC Handelsblad, they’ve also consumed a world-renown library of photobooks, put together over the last six years by Dutch collector Manfred Heiting.

Based at Cutberth Road, Malibu, Heiting’s collection included vintage photographs, posters, ceramics and art deco furniture – and at least 36,000 photobooks. Residents in this area were told to evacuate a week ago, and the coastal town is now “a war zone”, Heiting told NRC Handelsblad. At the time of the report on 20 November, Heiting has not yet been given the green light to visit his house but he stated that: “On satellite photos I can see that everything in my neighborhood has disappeared. Two or three houses may have survived. The rest was pulverized in a ten-minute fire storm.”

Once a director of Polaroid’s international division, Heiting started collecting photography in the 1970s, when he focused on gathering prints. In 2002 he sold this collection to the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, and started to focus on photobooks. His collection was considered one of the most complete in the world, including a copy of most of the important photobooks that appeared from 1888-1970 in Europe, the United States, the Soviet Union, and Japan.

Heiting’s expertise and collection were used in a series of compendiums published recently by Steidl – including The Soviet Photobook 1920-1941, The Japanese Photobook 1912-1980, and Czech and Slovak Photo Publications 1918-1998. He also worked on a website to make his archive more widely accessible, and used it in his lectures at the University of California.

According to NRC Handelsblad, the loss of Heiting’s collection is not just his loss, because he had recently donated his library to the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston. A few thousand books had already been transferred, but the rest was to stay with Heiting until 2023, for use in his research and publications. “The responsible curators were still visiting me at the beginning of October to make a definitive choice,” Heiting reportedly said. “It is terribly disappointing. For us all.”

“It is not easy now to put this loss away,” he adds. “But I have to close it soon. The collection will not come back.”

News from the World of Photography: August 2018

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Life and Dreams: Contemporary Chinese Photography and Media Art


The Walther Collection
Neu-Ulm, Germany
Until 18 November 2018

 

The Walther Collection presents Life and Dreams: Contemporary Chinese Photography and Media Art, the first extensive exhibition of works by Chinese artists represented in The Walther Collection. Featuring forty-three artists, Life and Dreams showcases a wide range of groundbreaking photography and media art produced by internationally recognized figures such as Yang Fudong, Zhang Peili, Ai Weiwei, Song Dong, Cao Fei, and Zhang Huan during an era of momentous social and economic change. It also incorporates new acquisitions and selected loans of significant media art by innovative younger artists such as Sun Xun, Lu Yang, and Cheng Ran to provide an up-to-the-minute account of the main directions and key achievements in contemporary Chinese photography and media art during the past three decades.

This Land


Pier 24
San Francisco, CA
1 June 2018 - 31 March 2019

This Land focuses on work made throughout the United States within the past decade. The photographers assembled here examine aspects of the country’s current social climate, from the mundane to the politicized.

The exhibition’s title is drawn from Woody Guthrie’s song “This Land Is Your Land” (1940). Viewed by many as an alternative national anthem, it alludes to the uneasy tensions fundamental to our vision of this nation filled with promise and peril, possibilities and letdowns. At the bottom of the sheet of paper on which Guthrie handwrote the song’s lyrics, he noted, “all you can write is what you see.” The artists included in this exhibition use cameras rather than pens, creating photographs that speak to what they see in the United States today.

Lucas Foglia: Human Nature


Museum of Contemporary Photography (MoCP)
Columbia College, Chicago, IL
19 July - 30 September 2018

 

The relationship between humans and nature is both symbiotic and fraught. In the present era of climate change, scientists and conservationists are scrambling to find solutions to myriad challenges such as resource depletion, ecosystem transformation, overpopulation, and species extinction. As our destruction of the natural world becomes more pervasive, our interactions with wilderness are in turn increasingly restrained, and the experiences we do have with nature often occur in human-made environments. In fact, we are spending more time than ever indoors, even as social science research indicates that a connection to nature is vital to our well-being.

Lucas Foglia (American, b. 1983) is interested in these complexities, and particularly in disputing the notion that people and nature are at odds. He began his project Human Nature (2006–16) in order to probe our relationship to the wilderness and to explore our fundamental need to commune with nature. With the skills of a seasoned photographer, and often with a touch of humor, he documents leisure activities, exploration, and some of the science behind climate change—often in remote locations. 

China Is Still Sorting Through Its Colorful Bike-Share Graveyards


The Atlantic

 In March, author Alan Taylor posted “The Bike-Share Oversupply in China: Huge Piles of Abandoned and Broken Bicycles,” showing just some of the millions of bicycles that had been rapidly built and dumped into Chinese cities by bike-share companies looking to get in on the next big thing, only to crash hard. In the months since, more of those bike-share startups have gone bankrupt or consolidated, and the bicycle graveyards remain. Municipal governments are still wrangling with the fallout, confiscating derelict or illegally parked bikes, crafting new laws, and working out what to do with millions of abandoned bicycles. In a few cases, plans have been announced to refurbish and distribute some of the bikes to smaller neighboring towns, in others, wholesale recycling has begun, and bicycles are being crushed into cubes. The scale of the situation was so large to begin with, it will be a long time before the bicycle graveyards fade away.
 

Pentti Sammallahti, Finland’s top photographer


The Economist

Under a low sun, a frog with a thuggish expression swims alone in a pond, its black reflection a crisply outlined mirror image on the still water. It stares straight ahead; an eye-to-eye confrontation seems imminent. This sinister yet amusing picture was taken by Pentti Sammallahti, a 68-year-old Finnish photographer with an unusual status: he is at once feted and deliberately low-profile.

His modest prices—prints start at €600 ($702)—are part of the explanation. Peter Fetterman, who exhibited Mr Sammallahti’s work at the Masterpiece fair in London this month, says he “is the best photographer whose work you can afford.”...

Artist Collier Schorr on the Medium and the Message


AnOther

After 20 years of making pictures that span fashion, art and collage Collier Schorr’s studio is, predictably, a bit of a mess. “[It’s] small, and in disarray,” she tells me, smiling, before the opening of her new solo exhibition, In Front of the Camera at London’s Modern Art gallery. “It’s constantly being cleaned, and then I do collages for a fashion story, and it becomes a complete hellhole of scraps of paper. And what happens then is that pictures float around and get mixed up and get lost and get found years later.”...


IPPAWARDS

The iPhone Photography Awards (IPPAWARDS) is proud to announce the winners of the 11th Annual Awards. This year’s winners were selected from thousands of entries submitted by iPhone photographers from over 140 countries around the world...

The First Photograph


Harry Ransom Center
The University of Texas at Austin

The First Photograph, or more specifically, the earliest known surviving photograph made in a camera, was taken by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826 or 1827. The image depicts the view from an upstairs window at Niépce's estate, Le Gras, in the Burgundy region of France. Learn more about the First Photograph through the links provided on the Harry Ransom Center website.

Overlooked Stories From Latin American Photographers


The New York Times LENS Blog

In the South Bronx’s Melrose neighborhood, second only to Times Square as New York’s busiest, residents may soon find plenty of reasons to stop and enjoy the view.

Hustling to the subway or bustling among shoppers on tightly packed sidewalks, they can happen upon arresting new sights: images of life in Latin America and the Caribbean, mounted on a chain-link fence along a sidewalk, arrayed in a community garden or displayed on the grounds of Immaculate Conception School.

Melrose is becoming a gallery, inside and out. For its Latin American Foto Festival, the Bronx Documentary Center is again sharing photography with the community it calls home. The festival, running July 12 to 22, busts past the white walls of exhibition spaces with eight installations, seven beyond the center.  

Photo essays from more than a dozen acclaimed and emerging documentary photographers from Colombia, Peru, Ecuador, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and Mexico, as well as contributions from FotoKids, which teaches photography to Guatemalan children, will hang in and outside neighborhood landmarks and city streets...  

Cortona on the Move: International Photography Festival


Cortona On The Move
Cortona, Italy
12 July - 30 September 2018


Founded in 2011 by the Associazione Culturale ONTHEMOVE, the principal objective of Cortona On The Move is to spread and promote contemporary photography by bringing new creative talents and novel forms of visual communication to the forefront.

Under the artistic direction of Arianna Rinaldo, the festival provides a continuing exchange between field experts and a ceaseless search for work which represents the ongoing evolution of the photographic language, all showcased within the enchanting Etruscan hilltown of Cortona.

Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings


Peabody Essex Museum
Salem, Massachusetts
30 June - 23 September 2018

For more than forty years, Sally Mann has made experimental and hauntingly beautiful images that have made her one of the country’s most influential and distinguished photographers. The artist’s first major traveling exhibition, Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings, explores themes of family, memory, mortality, and home as well as the Southern landscape as repository of personal and collective memory. Some 115 photographs — many of which have not been exhibited or published previously — offer a sweeping overview of Mann’s artistic achievement, vision, and drive.

Here Sarah Kennel, PEM's Byrne Family Curator of Photography, talks about the pioneering artist and the enduring power of photography to tell important stories...

How Amy Arbus Confronted the Death of Her Mother, Diane


AnOther

In 1992, Amy Arbus took a masterclass with Richard Avedon at the International Center of Photography in New York and embarked on a project that would forever change her relationship to the medium. She took a single roll of black and white self-portraits in a bathtub, where she began to confront and consider the death of her mother Diane Arbus, who committed suicide in one on July 26, 1971.

Then 38 years old, it had been 21 years since her mother’s death, and Arbus set about revisiting a scene she had never witnessed herself. The result was an intense series of eight photographs, which will be on view in Tub Pictures at The Schoolhouse Gallery in Provincetown, MA, from next week until August 8, 2018. We caught up with Arbus to discuss this powerful body of work, and the ways in which it transformed her life...


New Mexico Museum of Art
Santa Fe, New Mexico
Until 4 November 2018


Shifting Light offers a twenty-first century perspective on the museum’s long-term engagement with the popular medium of photography. Organized into the broad categories of land and place, culture and identity, community and interconnection, and vision and creativity, the exhibition juxtaposes photographs in ways that amplify their meanings and suggest new narratives. Ansel Adams’ famous 1940 photograph Moonrise, Hernandez is paired with a 1975 landscape by Thomas Barrow from his series Cancellations, while Alfred Stieglitz’s 1918 portrait of Georgia O’Keeffe keeps company with images by Anne Noggle and Joyce Neimanas.

Christie's

A landmark sale features rare examples of works by 19th and 20th-century American masters of the medium, including Alfred Stieglitz, Edward Steichen, Dorothea Lange, Edward Weston, Paul Strand and many more...
 
On 4 and 5 October, key works by Steiglitz will be offered at Christie’s in New York in a dedicated sale, An American Journey: The Diann G. and Thomas A. Mann Collection of Photographic Masterworks. The Mann Collection contains his most iconic works from the Photo-Secessionist period, printed as oversized photogravures; each example is signed and mounted. 
 
Included in the sale are prints of The Terminal (1892), The Hand of Man (1902), and the artists’ own print of The Steerage (1907). Perhaps Steiglitz’s most frequently reproduced photograph, The Steerage was exhibited in both the 1917 Society of Independent Artists’ show in New York and the 1944 Philadelphia Museum of Art exhibition that surveyed his work and personal collection.

These key prints come to auction alongside rare examples of works by Steiglitz’s counterparts in the Photo-Secession, including Edward Steichen, Gertrude Käsebier and Clarence White, and Modernist masterworks by Edward Weston, Paul Strand 
and Charles Sheeler.

SFMOMA
San Francisco, CA
21 July - 21 October 2018 


From war and human rights to cultural identity and domestic violence, Susan Meiselas’s (American, b. 1948) work covers a wide range of subjects and countries. This retrospective brings together projects from the beginning of her career in the 1970s to the present day, including her iconic portraits of carnival strippers, vivid color images of the conflicts in Central America in the 1980s, and an ongoing investigation into the history and aftermath of the Kurdish genocide.

A member of Magnum Photos since 1976, Meiselas creates work that raises provocative questions about documentary practice, and the relationship between photographer and subject. The exhibition highlights her unique working method, combining photography, video, sound, and installation to explore different scales of time and conflict, ranging from the personal to the geopolitical.

The Los Angeles Times

In the early 1970s, a decade into shooting conflicts around the world, Don McCullin said in the exhibition catalog "The Concerned Photographer 2": "I haven't got very much longer to go at being a war photographer. I mean the chips are down already."

And yet a few years ago, at 80, McCullin could be found in Iraq, camera in hand.

McCullin is a giant in the field of war reportage, though you'd barely know it from his show at the Hauser & Wirth gallery in Los Angeles. Billed as the London-born, Somerset-based photojournalist's first gallery exhibition in the U.S., it's more missed opportunity than proper introduction. At just under 30 pictures, it presents a thin slice — more frosting than cake — of a broad and deep career chronicling military, political, social and economic strife...
Tate Modern
London, UK
Until 14 October 2018


Shape of Light is the first major exhibition to explore the relationship between the two, spanning the century from the 1910s to the present day. It brings to life the innovation and originality of photographers over this period, and shows how they responded and contributed to the development of abstraction. 
 
Key photographs are brought together from pioneers including Man Ray and Alfred Stieglitz, major contemporary artists such as Barbara Kasten and Thomas Ruff, right up to exciting new work by Antony Cairns, Maya Rochat and Daisuke Yokota, made especially for the exhibition.

News from the World of Photography: July 2018

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News from the World of Photography: June 2018

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Elliott Erwitt: Pittsburgh 1950


International Center of Photography (ICP) Museum
New York, NY
23 May - 2 September 2018


In 1950 Elliott Erwitt, then just twenty-two years old, set out to capture Pittsburgh’s transformation from an industrial city into a modern metropolis. Commissioned by Roy Stryker, the mastermind behind the large-scale documentary photography projects launched by the US government during the Great Depression, Erwitt shot hundreds of frames. His images recorded the city’s communities against the backdrop of urban change, highlighting his quiet observations with the playful wit that has defined his style for over five decades. After only four months, Erwitt was drafted into the army and sent to Germany, leaving his negatives behind in Stryker’s Pittsburgh Photographic Library. The negatives remained at the Pennsylvania Department of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh for decades. This exhibition, organized by Assistant Curator Claartje van Dijk in association with the photographer, will present these images in the United States for the first time.  

The book Pittsburgh: 1950 is available for purchase in the ICP Museum shop for the duration of the show.

It Was an Ad? So What. It’s Still Art.


The New York Times

In the hills high above Los Angeles, within the white-columned serenity of the J. Paul Getty Museum, the bastard stepchild of the fine art world is finally getting its birthright.

On Tuesday, June 26, “Icons of Style: A Century of Fashion Photography, 1911-2011” opens, and it may be the most sweeping such survey in decades, featuring 198 works (pictures, magazine covers, ad campaigns, garments) throughout eight galleries and spanning images both obvious and unknown.

Richard Avedon’s “Dovima With Elephants,” the 1955 print of a Dior evening gown amid the pachyderms, which the show’s curator said became the most expensive fashion photograph sold at auction when it went for over $1 million at Christie’s in 2010? It’s in there. Erwin Blumenfeld’s photo of Lisa Fonssagrives in a Lucien Lelong dress hanging off the side of the Eiffel Tower, the poster on many a dorm room wall? That, too. Ditto for Bruce Weber’s 1982 Calvin Klein underwear ad featuring a briefs-clad Tom Hintnaus silhouetted against a white adobe structure in the shape of a phallus. Once upon a time, it stopped traffic in Times Square...

Visions d’Artistes – Pictorialist Photographs, 1890-1960


The Eye of Photography

From June 16th to September 16th, the museum Nicéphore Niépce in Chalon-sur-Saône devotes a large exhibition to a major chapter in the history of photography, pictorialism.

The ambition of this international aesthetic movement born around 1890 was to make the creative potential of the photographic image admitted by producing art pictures.

Never a Lovely So Real: Photography and Film in Chicago, 1950–1980


Art Institute Chicago
Chicago, IL
Until 28 October 2018

 In his 1951 book Chicago: City on the Make, Nelson Algren offered bittersweet praise for the city: “Like loving a woman with a broken nose, you may well find lovelier lovelies. But never a lovely so real.” This unique character—fraught with affection, tension, and contradiction—is revealed in the work of the many photographers and filmmakers who documented Chicago in the second half of the 20th century as cultural, social, and political events transformed the city. These artists focused on Chicago’s history as a city of neighborhoods, many of them fiercely segregated and separated from one another. Together, they constructed a portrait of Chicago that speaks equally to its allure and its haunting brutality.

Drawn largely from the Art Institute’s collection, this exhibition highlights the work of artists who through their images and films captured the life of their own communities or those to which they were granted intimate access as outsiders. Featured among them is a network of photographers who focused on Chicago’s South Side during a period coinciding with the emergence of the city’s Black Arts Movement. Billy Abernathy, Darryl Cowherd, Bob Crawford, Roy Lewis, and Robert A. Sengstacke all produced work in connection with the revolutionary Bronzeville mural, the Wall of Respect (1967–71). Other projects, such as Mikki Ferrill’s decade-long documentation of an improvised South Side club, The Garage (1970/80), and two of Gordon Parks’s Life magazine assignments (1953 and 1963), likewise underscore the role played by Chicago as a national center of black culture and politics.

 

Ursula Schulz-Dornburg: The Land In-Between– Photographs from 1980 to 2012


Stadel Museum
Frankfurt, Germany
Until 9 September 2018
 

The photographer Ursula Schulz-Dornburg (b. 1938) has been devoting herself to border landscapes, places of transit and relics of past cultures for more than forty years. With the aid of thirteen extensive workgroups and altogether more than 200 works, the Städel Museum is offering the first comprehensive institutional survey of the artist’s oeuvre ever in the exhibition Ursula Schulz-Dornburg: The Land In-Between – Photographs from 1980 to 2012, to be presented from 4 July to 9 September 2018. Schulz-Dornburg, who was born in Berlin and now lives in Düsseldorf, devotes herself in her photos to cult and culture sites in Europe, Asia and the Near East, and above all to the visible and invisible borders of these continents and regions. Her analogue black-and-white photographs are testimonies to no-longer-existing landscapes, past political systems, cultural milieus in the process of dissolution, and expiring societies. Distinguished by ethnological curiosity and an archaeological perspective, the images are on the interfaces between documentarism and political photography, between concept art and a sense of the responsibility to provide insight. Schulz-Dornburg is interested in the marks human beings have left behind in the landscape in the course of lengthy historical processes, as well as in recent political changes of the kind brought about, for example, by the Golf Wars (between 1980 and 2003).

Paul Arden Collection – Through the Eyes of Four Photographers

 

The Eye of Photography

Through the Eyes of Four Photographers features works by Brian Griffin, Andrew Holligan, Bruce Rae and Gerry Castle.

Four seemingly diverse photographers have been brought together by the discerning eye of the late Paul Arden, Creative Director of Saatchi and Saatchi, a friend and collaborator with all four.

The show includes works from Paul and his wife Toni’s personal collection, assembled over three decades, plus some new works from these photographers.


Ocean Gallery, UCSB
Santa Barbara, CA
Through 31 August


The photos are chilling: Giant swathes of devastation in the Brazilian Amazon. Men hip-deep in the brown muck of the gouged and flooded earth. They are the scenes of illegal gold mining in Garimpeiros: The Wildcat Gold Miners of the Amazon Rainforest, an exhibition in the Ocean Gallery of the UC Santa Barbara Library through Aug. 31.

Curated by Jeffrey Hoelle, an associate professor of anthropology, and Jonathan Rissmeyer, library senior artist, the exhibit of 42 photos explores the world of wildcat miners, or 
garimpeiros, who try to make a living scratching gold out of the rainforest...

Aftermath Project: War is Only Half the Story


Los Angeles Public Library
Los Angeles, CA
22 June - 19 August 2018


War is Only Half the Story is a ten-year retrospective of the work of the groundbreaking documentary photography program, The Aftermath Project. Founded to help change the way the media covers conflict- and to educate the public about the true cost of war and the real price of peace- The Aftermath Project has discovered some of the most groundbreaking photographers in the world working on post-conflict themes. War is Only Half the Story tells the incredibly moving stories of the people left behind after the cameras have moved on from a war zone. Drawing on photographs from over fifty photographers, these personal and often poetic post-war views unveil not only another side to the devastating effects of war, but also tells the stories of people coming together to rebuild and heal. The exhibit illuminates and defines our humanity while giving visibility to those coping with the lingering ramifications of conflict.

Peter Hujar: Speed of Life


BAMPFA
Berkeley, CA
30 June - 18 November 2018 

Peter Hujar (1934–1987), a prominent figure in the downtown New York art scene in the 1970s and 1980s, is best known for his intimate, searching, and playful portraits of artists, writers, and performers, including Susan Sontag, William S. Burroughs, David Wojnarowicz, and the masters of drag theater. Private by nature, combative in manner, well read, and widely connected, Hujar inhabited the downtown world of avant-garde dance, music, art, and performance. His mature career paralleled the public unfolding of gay life between the Stonewall uprising in 1969 and the AIDS crisis of the 1980s.

In his loft studio in the East Village, Hujar focused on those who followed their creative instincts and shunned mainstream success. He made, in his words, “uncomplicated, direct photographs of complicated and difficult subjects,” immortalizing moments, landscapes, individuals, and subcultures passing at the speed of life.

Peter Hujar: Speed of Life presents more than one hundred photographs by this enormously important and influential artist. The pictures, in this first retrospective of the artist’s work, chart Hujar’s career from his beginnings in the mid-1950s to his central role in the East Village art scene three decades later.

Susan Meiselas: Breaching Boundaries in Photography


The New York Times LENS Blog

Susan Meiselas, who joined Magnum Photos in 1976, is also the president and co-founder of the Magnum Foundation.  Born in 1948 and starting as a teacher in the South Bronx, she went on to produce a definitive chronicle of Nicaragua’s Sandinista revolution. More recently, she has led the foundation’s efforts to nurture a new, diverse generation of photographers. Her books include “Carnival Strippers,” “Nicaragua,” and “Prince Street Girls.” In the last year, she has also been the subject of two books, “Susan Meiselas: Mediations” (Damiani) and “Susan Meiselas: On the Frontline” (Thames & Hudson). She spoke with James Estrin about her career. The conversation has been edited for clarity and length...

Arles: Archive and found photography sweeps the board in the 2018 Prix du Livre


The British Journal of Photography

From a series of diptychs designed to stimulate senile dementia patients to - controversially - an alternative take on Bertolt Brecht's War Primer which was first published in 2011, Arles' book awards went to images from the archives.

Three winners and one special mention have been announced for the 2018 Prix du Livre at Rencontres d’Arles – and in all four cases, the books use archival or found photography. The Author Book Award went to Laurence Aëgerter’s 'Photographic Treatment', which is published by Dewi Lewis; the Historical book award went to 'The Pigeon Photographer', a collection of images by Julius Neubronner published by Rorhof; and – controversially – the Photo-text Book Award went to Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin’s 'War Primer 2', which was first published by MACK in 2011 but reissued in paperback this year. A special mention went to Giorgio Di Noto’s 'The Iceberg' in the Author Book Award, which is published by Édition Patrick Frey...

Exploring Hollywood’s Sinister Underbelly, with Artist Alex Prager


AnOther

California’s palm-lined streets, intense sunshine and abundant blue skies are embedded in our cultural consciousness. The city is the epitome of the American dream, imbued with cinematic characteristics and symbolising the promise of perfection. It attracts those seeking reinvention, or who simply desire to become something they are not – but buried just beneath this fantasy lies a potent sense of unease and existential dread.

This tension is the lifeblood of Alex Prager’s practice. Her large-scale film and photographic works
utilise the tricks and tools of Hollywood to expertly portray the haunting side of the human psyche. “The city itself was built on artifice,” she tells AnOther. “It’s a strange alternative
reality. There is perfection on the surface, but the underbelly is right there and if you dip your toe in just a little bit, it gets ugly, weird and strange. I’m constantly examining these hidden layers.” ...


British Journal of Photography

'Snapdragon' is a revelation, a unique telling of a unique man’s early life. It is told in large part by Phil Stern, the young man himself, but with all the supporting detail and the rest of the story filled in by his biographer Liesl Bradner.

Phil Stern led a very adventurous life. By age 21 he was already a Life magazine photographer shooting pictures of Hollywood stars. But when WW2 began he volunteered for the army and became a member of Darby’s Rangers, now famed for their exploits in Africa and Sicily but then a newly formed and untested combat unit. Because he joined them as a serviceman and not as a correspondent he had the unique opportunity to photograph the troops and the fighting as an insider in the thick of it. They saw him as one of them too and named him Snapdragon. For the next two years Phil was there for it all and he pictured it in detail. Then in 1943 he was wounded a second time and sent back stateside. Once back he wrote of the life he had lived and the men he had known. His stories, told with his memories fresh and a fine photographer’s eye for detail are as absorbing and present as if what he was writing about had happened earlier in the day...

View Finder: Landscape and Leisure in the Collection


Museum of Contemporary Photography (MoCP)
Chicago, IL
19 July - 30 September 2018


Photography has played a vital role in our understanding of the outdoors, allowing us to view natural spaces without being physically present in them. Parks fill a similar role, as they provide institutional access points and infrastructure into wild, natural spaces. In his book Our National Parks (1901), John Muir, cofounder of the Sierra Club, wrote: “Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, overcivilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wildness is a necessity; and that mountain parks and reservations are useful not only as fountains of timber and irrigating rivers, but as fountains of life.” Presenting a selection of historical and contemporary works from the MoCP’s permanent collection and the Midwest Photographers Project, View Finder: Landscape and Leisure in the Collection considers the varied ways these designated outdoor spaces enhance human experience, from allowing for rest and refuge to their ability to meet other, more subliminal needs.


Chrysler Museum of Art
Norfolk, VA
6 April - 12 August 2018


The show spans photographic history—from 19th-century daguerreotypes for which subjects sat immobilized during the early camera’s long exposure time to contemporary photographs that use special lights and mechanics to capture multiple moments in a single frame. In addition to a technical story about the camera’s ability to freeze a slice of time, the show highlights works that make time their subject, investigating notions of permanence and decay, history and memory and essence and accident. The exhibition will include works by Harold Edgerton, Vera Lutter, William Christenberry and many others.

Philadelphia Museum of Art
Philadelphia, PA
21 April - 19 August 2018 


Trial and error reveals unexpected results.

Photography distills the flow of time into singular, still moments. The artists in this installation stop, extend, and rearrange time for their own creative ends, whether to convey personal memories, render visible overlooked aspects of nature, contemplate mortality, or document the passage of time. Through their unique approaches to capturing motion, they encourage us to look at what may and may not be in plain view.

Boca Raton Museum of Art
Boca Raton, FL
24 April - 21 October 2018


Lisette Model (1901-1983) is one of the most influential street photographers, best known for her direct portrayal of the peculiarities of average people captured candidly in everyday situations. She was born in Vienna and discovered photography when she moved to Paris and joined André Kertész’s circle. In 1937 she decided to become a photographer and the next year she immigrated to New York City. Model’s work appeared regularly in publications such as Harper’s Bazaar and her work was included in an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in 1940. She was also an influential artist and teacher who famously taught Diane Arbus.
Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO)
Ontario, Canada
28 April 2018 - 14 April 2019


The First World War is recognized as a period of mass violence and destruction, but also as a beginning. The war ushered in technological innovation, mechanizing and recording war in ways previously impossible. The growing pervasiveness of photography resulted in a conflict well-documented by military officials, press agencies, and amateurs alike.

The Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) holds nearly 500 albums from this period, a unique and extensive collection donated in 2004 by a private collector. The albums reveal different aspects of the relationship between warfare and photography; retrospectively, all of them—personal, official, and commercial—engage in a dialogue with history by presenting unique visual narratives that uphold or challenge historical perceptions of war. The breadth of albums and accounts—British, French, German, Canadian, Austrian, American, Australian, Italian, Czech, and Russian—expose the multiplicities of experience as well as the commonalities of war.

Adjacent to the main display, the McEwen Gallery will showcase works by Australian war photographer James Francis “Frank” Hurley (1885–1962), who was on official assignment throughout World War I. His album Australian Units on the Western Front (1916–1918) presents a series of compelling photographs, each offering views of different aspects of life on the Front. Soldiers, in action and at ease, are pictured, as well as the grimmer realities of war: casualties, scorched landscapes, and destroyed architecture. The album—disassembled for the exhibition—highlights Hurley’s skill as a photographer and features a rich breadth of imagery.

These exhibitions present visitors with a rich opportunity to explore these photographic objects that construct a history of aerial technology and photography, which influenced the operation and outcome of the First World War, a visual record of war that is often left unseen. Together, they contributed to the beginning of a visual consciousness of war that resonates to this day.

News from the World of Photography: May 2018

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Not an Ostrich: And Other Images from America's Library


Annenberg Space for Photography 
Los Angeles, CA
21 April - 9 September 2018


Not an Ostrich: And Other Images from America’s Library is the result of celebrated American photography curator Anne Wilkes Tucker’s excavation of nearly 500 images—out of a collection of over 14 million—permanently housed at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. While visitors to the exhibition might never see an ostrich, they will see the image entitled “Not an Ostrich” and a large selection of rare and handpicked works from the vaults of the world’s largest library, many never widely available to the public.

This exhibition spans across the history of photography—from daguerreotypes, the first photographic process, to contemporary digital prints. Iconic portraits of Abraham Lincoln, John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Cesar Chavez, and Elizabeth Taylor appear alongside unusual images, such as, Stanley Kubrick’s “Strong Man’s Family” (1947), John Vachon’s “Ice Fishing, Minnesota” (1956), Susana Raab’s “Chicken in Love, Athens, OH” (2006) and Nina Berman’s “Flammable Faucet #4, Monroeton, PA” (2011). Vivid color portrayals of America, across time, are highlighted in juxtapositions of popular travel views from the late 19th century, created by the Detroit Publishing Company using the then-latest “photochrom” technology, on a screen next to striking contemporary scenes captured by Carol M. Highsmith.

David Douglas Duncan,102, Who Photographed the Reality of War, Dies

The New York Times

Under the helmets, the faces are young and tormented, stubbled and dirty, taut with the strain of battle. They sob over dead friends. They stare exhausted into the fog and rain. They crouch in a muddy foxhole. This goddamn cigarette could be the last. There are no heroes in David Douglas Duncan’s images of war.

Dark and brooding, mostly black and white, they are the stills of a legendary combat photographer, an artist with a camera, who brought home to America the poignant lives of infantrymen and fleeing civilians caught up in World War II, the Korean conflict and the war in Vietnam.

“I felt no sense of mission as a combat photographer,” Mr. Duncan, who was wounded several times, told The New York Times in 2003. “I just felt maybe the guys out there deserved being photographed just the way they are, whether they are running scared, or showing courage, or diving into a hole, or talking and laughing. And I think I did bring a sense of dignity to the battlefield.”...

Winslow Homer and the Camera: Photography and the Art of Painting


Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Brunswick, ME
23 June - 28 October 2018

 

This exhibition explores the question of Homer’s relationship with the medium of photography and its impact on his artistic practice. As one attuned to appearances and how to represent them, Homer understood that photography, as a new technology of sight, had much to reveal. This exhibition thus adds an important new dimension to our appreciation of this pioneering American painter, demonstrating his recognition that photography did not undermine, but instead complemented his larger artistic interests.

Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Decisive Moment


International Center of Photography
New York, NY
23 May - 2 September 2018

 Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Decisive Moment examines Cartier-Bresson’s influential publication, widely considered to be one of the most important photobooks of the twentieth century. Pioneering for its emphasis on the photograph itself as a unique narrative form, The Decisive Moment was described by Robert Capa as “a Bible for photographers.” Originally titled Images à la Sauvette (“images on the run”) in the French, the book was published in English with a new title, The Decisive Moment, which unintentionally imposed the motto which would define Cartier-Bresson’s work. The exhibition details how the decisions made by the collaborators in this major project—including Cartier-Bresson, French art publisher Tériade, American publisher Simon & Schuster, and Henri Matisse, who designed the book’s cover—have shaped our understanding of Cartier-Bresson’s photographs. Through vintage gelatin silver prints, first-edition publications, periodicals, and correspondence, Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Decisive Moment brings new insights to this iconic work. 

Portfolio Showcase 11: Exhibition & Publication


The Center for Fine Art Photography
Fort Collins, CO
13 June - 7 July 2018
ARTISTS

Laura J. Bennett – Solo Exhibition Winner
JoAnn Carney
Teri Havens
Sharon Kain
Michael Knapstein
Melissa Lazuka
Florian Mueller
David Pace and Stephen Wirtz
Laura Pannack
Jerry Takigawa

What Is Art Photography? Catherine Edelman Offers Her Opinion

LensCulture

Debuting with the Ballad of Sexual Dependency by Nan Goldin in 1987, Catherine Edelman Gallery has been a leader in the fine art world for more than thirty years. Representing artists like Bruce Davidson, Michael Kenna, Joel-Peter Witkin, Jess T. Dugan and many more, the gallery is a respected institution in the US and beyond. In the past, the gallery has shown a wide variety of work, including documentary photography (Susan Meiselas, James Nachtwey), fashion photography (Annie Leibovitz, Herb Ritts), and traditional landscape photographs (Michael Kenna)...


National Portrait Gallery
London, UK
7 March - 27 May 2019 

A major new exhibition of works by Martin Parr, one of Britain’s best-known and most widely celebrated photographers. Only Human: Martin Parr, brings together some of Parr’s best-known photographs with a number of works never exhibited before to focus on one of his most engaging subjects – people. The exhibition will include portraits of people from around the world, with a special focus on Parr’s wry observations of Britishness, explored through a series of projects that investigate British identity today, including new works which reveal Parr’s take on the social climate in Britain in the aftermath of the EU referendum.

"Style: A Century of Fashion Photography, 1911-2011" at Getty


Blouin Artinfo

Chronicling the trends of fashion photography that have defined evolving ideas of style and beauty through the century, the J.Paul Getty Museum presents  Style: A Century of Fashion Photography, 1911-2011, June 26-October 21.

The exhibition includes more than 160 fashion images, including work by the likes of Herb Ritts, Lillian Bassman, Richard Avedon, Guy Bourdin, Erwin Blumenfeld, Louise Dahl-Wolfe, Hiro, and Scott Schuman. The show includes a variety of supplementary material, including illustrations, magazine covers, videos, and advertisements. Works by lesser-known but influential artists such as Corinne Day, Gleb Derujinsky, Toni Frissell, and Kourken Pakchanian are also included.

Robert Weingarten: Focus on Infinity


Los Angeles Public Library
6 June - 5 August 2018 

For the large-scale photographs in this exhibition, Los Angeles photographer Robert Weingarten established a single viewpoint, looking southeast over Santa Monica Bay, from which every photograph in the series would be made with the camera in exactly the same position. Each exposure would be made at precisely the same time of day—6:30 a.m.—measured by a quartz clock. All exposures were made with the lens focused on infinity and at the same aperture of f/22. Just two variables were allowed into this disciplined scheme: the shutter speed of the lens, which would be adjusted faster or slower depending on the quantity and quality of light available at 6:30 a.m. each day; and, the most variable element of all, changes in the scene that were introduced by the forces of nature. The resulting images are at once conceptual and an homage to a city at the edge of the North American continent, showcasing the unique light conditions that inform life here.

Chronicling the Lives of Women Along the Colombian-Venezuelan Border


The New York Times LENS Blog
 

Juanita Escobar likes to immerse herself in her projects. The self-taught photographer spent eight years living among the llaneros, the cowboys who work the plains of Colombia.  Now she has gone even farther, moving to what is perhaps her country’s most rural — and distant — 300 kilometer stretch of the Orinoco River, where she has been chronicling life along the border between Colombia and Venezuela...

International Photography Competition 2018


The Florida Museum of Photographic Arts (FMoPA)
Tampa, FL

Check out winners in each category (Conceptual, Abstract, Still Life, Documentary, Social, and Political Journalism, Nature, Science, and Animals, Places, Landscapes, and Drone, People and Portraits, & finally People’s Choice)...

11th Julia Margaret Cameron Award


The Photography Gala Awards

570 women photographers from 63 countries participated in the 11th edition of the Julia Margaret Cameron Award for Women Photographers Award submitting 5732 images. Given the quality of works, the juror, assisted by the team of curators of The Gala Awards have decided to award three photographers in this edition, that will share the First Prize. The prize of $3,000 will be divided among the three winners of the Award.

We're happy to announce that Monica Gorini from Italy, Diana Nicholette Jeon from United States, and Isabella Pacini from Germany, were selected as winners of the 11th edition of the Julia Margaret Cameron Award.

Their work will be exhibited in the 5th Biennial of Fine Art & Documentary Photography to be held in Barcelona this October.


British Journal of Photography

Europe boasts more than a hundred photography festivals, but few match the scale and ambition of Photo España in Madrid. This year, the organisation behind it, La Fábrica, celebrates the festival’s 20th edition with a typically eclectic summer season of activities throughout the Spanish capital, encompassing the work of more than 500 artists across dozens of venues that range from the small to the iconic.

“The festival is a collective project with a wide variety of institutions, both public and private, supporting it,” says director Claude Bussac, who is hoping that the 2018 edition will “push forward both the formal and geographical boundaries of photography… We aim to celebrate our 20th anniversary questioning photographic meaning and inviting photographers from every continent.”...

Dorothea Lange: Politics of Seeing at Barbican Centre


The Guardian

The Barbican in London is staging the first UK survey of the work of American documentary photographer Dorothea Lange (1895–1965), one of the most influential photographers of the 20th century. The exhibition charts Lange’s output and includes her celebrated Farm Security Administration work that captured the devastating impact of the Great Depression on the American population.

Dorothea Lange: Politics of Seeing
Barbican Art Gallery, London 
22 June – 2 September 2018


AnOther

American image-maker Saul Leiter was a famously private man, keeping a markedly low profile throughout his lifetime in spite of the widespread acclaim he garnered as a fashion photographer in the 60s and 70s. His modus operandi was one of constant, quiet observation, whether capturing glorious Kodachrome studies of the New York City streets or lensing models for the likes of Harper’s Bazaar and Elle. “There’s a great story that Grace Coddington tells in her biography,” Margit Erb, director of the Saul Leiter Foundation, tells AnOther. “She was to be photographed by the famous Saul Leiter and was told to meet him in one of the squares in Manhattan. She went there and stood and waited for about half an hour but he was a no-show. She went back to the office and said, ‘I tried to find him but I couldn’t,’ and the director said, ‘Oh no, he’s photographed you!’ Saul had a telephoto lens and he’d waited for her to arrive, photographed her from a distance as she stood there waiting – probably with her hips out in a very natural way – and he got the image.”...

Musée Nicéphore Niépce
Chalon-sur-Saône, FR
16 June - 16 September 2018 


(translated from French)

Offering an updated, broader vision of the pictorialist endeavour on a European scale, 'Artists’ Visions' results from recent research and discoveries and is the first exhibition dedicated to pictorial photography for over a decade in France. Sourced in the collections of the musée Nicéphore Niépce that preserves works by Robert Demachy and Charles Lhermitte, as well as prints by Constant Puyo, José Ortiz-Echagüe and Alfred Fauvarque-Omez, the exhibition brings together over two-hundred vintage prints. They are the work of various authors, some of them famous, others little known even unknown, until now. Most of these prints are being shown for the very first time. They were created over a seventy-year period, from the early 1890s to the late 1950s, showing that pictorial photography did not disappear after the First World War, contrary to what the history of photography traditionally lead us to believe. The narrative has changed and a new history must be taken into account acknowledging the permanence of the pictorialist ideals. These ideals were built on a shared ambition: to create photographs that wanted to do more than simply reproduce the real, photographs that truly interpreted it, like an artist’s vision.

British Journal of Photography

Yassine Alaoui Ismaili (Morocco), Paul Botes (South Africa), Anna Boyiazis (USA), Tommaso Fiscaletti & Nic Grobler (South Africa), and Phumzile Khanyile (South Africa) are the five winners of the seventh CAP Prize. Open to photographers of any age or background, the CAP Prize is awarded to work that engages with the African continent or its diaspora...
LensCulture

John Chiara’s one-of-a-kind mural-size camera obscura prints are luscious, moody and magical. He builds his own giant cameras (one which is large enough for him to climb inside) so he can expose light directly onto large sheets of photo-sensitive paper to capture images without needing film to act as an intermediate negative. His photos offer up ordinary urban landscapes that seem like three dimensional sculptures infused with light flares and liquid color. Somehow—through his mix of the direct process, hand-cut photo paper, filters and chemicals—everything looks real but “charged” with heightened energy.

Each of the unique prints is a collector’s dream, and a generous new book from Aperture and Pier 24 offers perfect reproductions with stunning production values...

Photography in Berlin

Galerie 36 is pleased to present the first comprehensive exhibition of the visionary advertising images by American photographer Bert Stern (1929 – 2013) from the early fifties to the late sixties. The exhibition “Shapes & Symbols” shows a selection of iconic photographs that emerged during the highly productive time of his rise to become one of the leading advertising photographers. Many of the works exhibited have never before been publicly displayed outside publications and magazines of their time and can now be seen for the first time in terms of their artistic value...

Robert Adams: Our Lives and Our Children


Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson
Paris, France
16 May - 29 July 2018

Robert Adams (born in 1937) is known for his photographic oeuvre on the changing landscape of the American West and his environmental conscience. This is the first exhibition in Paris to show the entire Our Lives and Our Children series, one of the photographer’s most striking visual essays on environmental destruction. One day, in the 1970s, the photographer noticed a column of smoke rising above the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant near Denver, Colorado and decided to document the potential destruction of a nuclear disaster.

Armed with a Hasselblad, hidden behind a shopping bag, he paced the town and its suburbs, parking lots and shopping malls, photographing people shaped by the consumer society and living their lives under this threat. He was particularly interested in the visible ties between people in the grip of a potential danger, known but invisible. Hidden beneath the apparent tranquillity of these women, men and children, there’s a taut line between the chance that seems to bring them together and the almost imperceptible danger of a nuclear disaster which Robert Adams believes is inevitable.

The Secret Photographer Who Captured Four Decades of Life in St. Petersburg


Hyperallergic

Late last year, 17 years after Masha Ivashintsova’s death, her relatives found a treasure trove of negatives and undeveloped film while cleaning out the family attic in St. Petersburg, Russia. But unlike most long-lost family photos, the 30,000 images show a unique aesthetic, one that Ivashintsova hid from her loved ones, inviting comparisons to Chicago street photographer Vivian Maier...

A Puzzle With No Solution: Roger Ballen’s Quest for Meaning Through Photography


The New York Times

Roger Ballen grew up immersed in the photography world. His mother, Adrienne, was an editor at Magnum, and the walls of his childhood home in Rye, N.Y., were filled with her colleagues’ images. “By the time I went out to photograph seriously, which was around the age of eighteen, I had a clear idea of the level I was aiming at,” Mr. Ballen, 68, writes in “Ballenesque, Roger Ballen: A Retrospective,” the first retrospective book of his career, which Thames & Hudson published in October.

While Mr. Ballen, an internationally renowned artist with nearly a dozen books to his name, has photographed virtually his entire life, he didn’t start thinking of himself as an artist until his late 40s. He stopped working as a geologist only in his 50s. He directed his first viral music video in his 60s...

GETTY MUSEUM APPOINTS JAMES A. GANZ TO SENIOR CURATOR OF PHOTOGRAPHS

The Getty Museum

 The Getty Museum has announced the appointment of James A. Ganz to Senior Curator of Photographs. Ganz will oversee the museum’s renowned collection of nearly 150,000 photographs, which represent the history of the medium from its inception to the present day. He joins the Getty after ten years at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, where he served as Curator of the Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts.

“Mr. Ganz’s experience is a perfect fit with the mission and scholarly focus of the Getty’s Department of Photographs. His many years of curating exhibitions and acquiring significant works will greatly enrich our collection and the work of our curatorial staff,” says Timothy Potts, director of the J. Paul Getty Museum. “He brings an energy, enthusiasm, and leadership that will help the department engage with an even broader audience and tell new and thoughtful stories about the history of photography up to the present day.”

“I have long admired the Getty’s commitment to photography, from the depth and breadth of its collections to its spacious galleries and ambitious exhibition and publication programs,” says Ganz. “I look forward to working with my new colleagues on developing and interpreting the museum’s photographic holdings for its diverse audiences, and exploring innovative ways to embrace the public’s special fascination with this dynamic art form.”


Ganz received his Ph.D. in art history from Yale University, his M.A. from Williams College, and his B.A. from Trinity College. His specializations include 19th-century European and American photography, as well as California-based photographers, including Carleton Watkins, Eadweard Muybridge, Willard Worden, Peter Stackpole, and Arnold Genthe. Prior to his time at the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco, Ganz was a curator for over ten years at the Sterling & Francine Clark Art Institute in Massachusetts, where he established the collection of photographs. While at the Clark, he taught the history of photography and of prints in the Williams College Graduate Program in the History of Art. 

Ganz will join the Getty in July 2018. 

Being: New Photography 2018


Museum of Modern Art (MOMA)
New York, NY
Until 19 August 2018


Every two years, MoMA’s celebrated New Photography exhibition series presents urgent and compelling ideas in recent photography and photo-based art. This year’s edition, Being, asks how photography can capture what it means to be human.

At a time when questions about the rights, responsibilities, and dangers inherent in being represented—and in representing others—are being debated around the world, the works featured in Being call attention to assumptions about how individuals are depicted and perceived. Many challenge the conventions of photographic portraiture, or use tactics such as masking, cropping, or fragmenting to disorient the viewer. In others, snapshots or found images are taken from their original context and placed in a new one to reveal hidden stories. While some of the works might be considered straightforward representations of individuals, others do not include images of the human body at all. Together, they explore how personhood is expressed today, and offer timely perspectives on issues of privacy and exposure; the formation of communities; and gender, heritage, and psychology.

Exploring new ground and the many forms that the photographic image can take, New Photography is a key part of the Museum’s contemporary program. Since 1985, the series has introduced new work by over 100 artists from around the world. In 2018, Being brings together an international group of 17 artists at various stages in their careers, all presenting their work at the Museum for the first time.

Lee Friedlander in Louisiana


New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA)
New Orleans, LA
27 April - 12 August 2018

One of the most famous living American photographers, Lee Friedlander has been visiting Louisiana since 1957 to document New Orleans jazz and to make artful street photographs. Lee Friedlander in Louisiana is the first major exhibition in any institution to examine the full scope and influence of Friedlander’s work in the region on the history of photography.


San Francisco Camerawork (SFC)
San Francisco, CA
3 May - 30 June 2018

SF Camerawork is proud to present Focal Points, an exhibition of the inaugural CatchLight Fellowship and Everyday Bay Area photography project, produced by CatchLight in partnership with United Photo Industries. CatchLight is a San Francisco Bay Area-based non-profit that annually recognizes three exceptional photographers who bring awareness to challenging social issues.

Featuring work from the 2017 CatchLight fellows, Tomas Van Houtryve, Sarah Blesener, and Brian L. Frank who were each paired with a media partner—the Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting, The Center for Investigative Reporting, and the Marshall Project, respectively, along with local artists from the Everyday Bay Area Collective, this traveling exhibition explores how visual storytelling has the power to drive social change. 

The Big Picture: A Transformative Gift from the Hall Family Foundation


Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
Kansas City, MO
28 April - 7 October 2018


In late 2015 the Hall Family Foundation, in continuing its long support of the photography program at The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, made a special $10 million grant to broaden and deepen this collection. The Big Picture: A Transformative Gift from the Hall Family Foundation features a selection of the more than 800 photographs acquired thanks to this generous gift.

This gift allowed the curators to build on the photography collection’s existing strengths—primarily its broad holding of American daguerreotypes and prints—and to enhance its representation of 19th-and 20th-century European and contemporary international works. These new pieces span the entire history of the medium, from an 1826 print by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, the inventor of photography, to a 2016 work by legendary musician and artist Patti Smith.

Mariana Yampolsky: Photographs from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)

Vincent Price Art Museum
Monterey Park, CA
20 March - 8 December 2018


In conjunction with On-Site: Neighborhood Partnerships with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, LACMA presents an exhibition at the Vincent Price Art Museum featuring a recent donation of works by Mexican photographer Mariana Yampolsky.

Mexican photographer Mariana Yampolsky (1925–2002) captured the beauty and desolation of Mexico and its history. American born, she moved to Mexico at the age of 19 and built an artistic practice honoring the cultural, natural, and architectural elements that fed her spiritually and inspired her to become a Mexican citizen. Combining a straightforward photo-documentary style with a poetic approach, Yampolsky has described her gaze as matching her imagery—precise and delicate, never overtly strident and always respectful.

On-Site: Neighborhood Partnerships with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art is a community engagement initiative that creates ways to make LACMA’s programs and collection accessible to the communities of Los Angeles County with the goal of broadening participation in cultural experiences. The exhibition and LACMA’s partnership with the Vincent Price Art Museum and East Los Angeles College are important components of the On-Site program.

Shape of Light: 100 Years of Photography and Abstract Art


Tate Modern
London, UK
Until 14 October 2018

Shape of Light is the first major exhibition to explore the relationship between the two, spanning the century from the 1910s to the present day. It brings to life the innovation and originality of photographers over this period, and shows how they responded and contributed to the development of abstraction. 
 
Key photographs are brought together from pioneers including Man Ray and Alfred Stieglitz, major contemporary artists such as Barbara Kasten and Thomas Ruff, right up to exciting new work by Antony Cairns, Maya Rochat and Daisuke Yokota, made especially for the exhibition.

State of the Art: Christopher Burkett's Race To Finish Decades of Work


ProPhotoDaily

The Oregon-based photographer is best known for producing large-format film prints of American landscapes. Over the past four decades, Burkett and his wife Ruth have lugged cumbersome photo gear across all 50 states to capture scenes ranging from blueberry fields in Maine to sunsets in his home state.

“It is awkward. It’s heavy. It’s a struggle with depth of field, a struggle with wind motion. But if you get an image you really have something really in-depth to work with,” Burkett told the PBS Newshour.

He added, “If you are really trying to work with photography you find out real rapidly that seeing things and photographing them can be quite different. And in fact, you have an image that is from that viewpoint of the camera is actually higher resolution than you normally experience the world from that viewpoint on that angle. So you have essentially a certain element of — I can’t really call a super realism because it’s real but it’s more real than what we normally see.”...

A Rare Collection of 19th-Century Photographs of Native Americans Goes Online


Hyperallergic

Between 1879 and 1902, a man named John N. Choate served as official photographer for the Carlisle Indian School, a federally-funded boarding school in Pennsylvania established to assimilate Native American children into Euro-American culture. Enrollment of indigenous youth was essentially a way to “civilize” them; the pithy motto of its founder, General Richard Henry Pratt, was “Kill the Indian, and save the man.” Choate, who was non-Native, often documented how students changed over as they received new haircuts and attire and shed aspects of their own culture.

Some of his records of this thorny past are among a collection of 19th-century photographs of North American Indians recently digitized and uploaded by the American Antiquarian Society as a scholarly finding aid...


IMDB

Set during the final days of the admired photo development system known as Kodachrome, a father and son hit the road in order to reach the Kansas photo lab before it closes its doors for good...

Willy Ronis, the heart and the eyes of Paris


The Eye of Photography

A key figure in the history of French photography, Willy Ronis is among the giants of so-called “humanist” photography devoted to capturing, with a brotherly eye, the essence of everyday life. In 1985, Willy Ronis began to scour his photography archive to select what he considered to be the essence of his work. He put together six albums, which thus constitute his “photographic testament.”

These albums are being shown to the public for the first time and make up the matrix of the exhibition which can be seen and heard from April 27 to September 29, 2018 at the Pavillon Carré de Baudouin, a venue located in the heart of the artistic Ménilmontant district and celebrating its tenth anniversary this year...


British Photo History

The world’s first photographic experiments, pictures by 20th-century greats Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Steichen, recent acquisitions by Linda McCartney gifted by Paul McCartney and his family, and newly commissioned works by Thomas Ruff, will go on display this autumn as part of the V&A’s new Photography Centre.

Opening on 12 October, the first phase of the Photography Centre, designed by David Kohn Architects, will more than double the space dedicated to photography at the V&A. The inaugural display will trace a history of photography from the 19th century to the present day through the theme of collectors and
collecting. Drawn from the V&A’s significantly expanded holdings, following the transfer of the Royal Photographic Society (RPS) collection, the display will show seminal prints and negatives by pioneers William Henry Fox Talbot, Julia Margaret Cameron and Frederick Scott Archer, alongside camera equipment, photographic publications and original documents to tell a broader story of international photography. It will also feature a digital wall to show the most cutting-edge photographic imagery.

To mark the opening, the V&A has commissioned internationally renowned German photographer Thomas Ruff to create a new body of work. Known for taking a critical and conceptual approach to photography, Ruff’s new series will be inspired by Linnaeus Tripe’s 1850s paper negatives of India and Burma from the V&A’s collection...

Tate Modern
London, UK
Until 3 December 2018


Ruwedel has spent many years photographing the North American landscape. The works in this display span 1995–2012 and include images of abandoned railways, nuclear testing sites and empty desert homes.

Each series explores how past events have been inscribed onto the earth’s surface, reflecting the artist’s belief that ‘at this point in history, pure nature is no longer a viable subject.’ He explains: ‘I have come to think of the land as being an enormous historical archive. I am interested in revealing the narratives contained within the landscape, especially those places where the land reveals itself as being both an agent of change and a field of human endeavour.’

Ruwedel merges documentary and conceptual methods of imagemaking. He repeatedly photographs the same subject or type of subject, an approach that relates to conceptual art practices of the 1960s and 1970s. He is also influenced by land artists who created large-scale outdoor artworks in the late 1960s using materials such as earth and rock.

Flint Institute of Arts
Flint, Michigan
21 April - 12 August 2018


This exhibition reexamines the important contemporary art movement that found its roots in the late 1960s in California and New York and continues today known as Photorealism. Aligned with Pop Art, Photorealism features ordinary elements of contemporary life such as vehicles, buildings, streets, and consumer products in an objective, often clinical, manner. Artists Richard Estes, Audrey Flack, and Ralph Goings use photography as a tool to help them reproduce the image as realistically as possible on canvas. 

The paintings in the exhibition demonstrate that Photorealism remains undiluted, conceptually coherent, and consistently compelling. The works can be appreciated for their technique, finesse, and appealing subject matter; but viewers can go deeper and enjoy the complexity and contradictions, the multiple means of an entrance that Photorealism affords. 
Smithsonian National Museum of African History and Culture
Washington D.C.

The Museum acquired Bill Adler’s Eyejammie Hip Hop Photography Collection in 2015, which provided the impetus to create the recent exhibition, Represent: Hip-Hop Photography. The Eyejammie Hip Hop Photography Collection consists of nearly 500 images from more than 40 photographers. This is the largest collection of hip-hop images held by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History & Culture.

Recognizing hip-hop as a culture that permeates many aspects of modern society, this is a timely show to include at the Museum. Created in the Bronx, New York, in the 1970s, hip-hop is nearly fifty years old. The local, youth based art form, has grown into an international phenomenon over the years. Using the four elements of hip-hop (MCing, breakdancing, graffiti, and DJing) as an organizational tool, I created four exhibition areas to highlight aspects of hip-hop: identity, community, activism, and creativity...

The New York Times

On an August morning in 1951, two American women met for the first time in the corridor of the Hotel Berchielli in Florence. Ninalee Allen, who was known as Jinx, was a vacationing nursery-school teacher. Ruth Orkin was a freelance photojournalist who, after chatting with Ms. Allen, asked if would she would pose for a photo essay about women traveling alone.

Jinx agreed, and they set off on what Jinx called a “photographic lark.” As they came to the Piazza della Repubblica, 15 men were loitering. Some were leaning on a wall. Two sat on a motor scooter. Nearly all were staring at the 6-foot-tall Ms. Allen. One leered and grabbed his crotch...

Washington D.C.
7- 10 June 2018

Join us June 7 – 10 in the nation’s capital as we celebrate the art of photography and the stories behind the images. For four days, Focus on the Story will convene some of the top names in photography. We want to bring together a community of photography lovers for a series of outstanding keynote presentations, panel discussions, workshops, exhibits, portfolio reviews, photo walks and community events.

Whether you are a professional, amateur, enthusiast or curious, here is your chance to spend four days celebrating, learning, seeing, living and breathing photography. What could be better, right?

News from the World of Photography: April 2018

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2018 Professional Competition: Photographer of the Year - Alys Tomlinson, British


World Photography Organization

Ex Voto is a personal project by London-based photographer Tomlinson (age 43). The winning work encompasses formal portraiture, large format landscape and small, detailed still-life images of the ‘ex-votos’ (offerings of religious devotion) found at pilgrimage sites of Lourdes (France), Ballyvourney (Ireland) and Grabarka (Poland).

The photographer mainly explores themes of environment, belonging and identity.  She recently completed an MA (Distinction) in Anthropology of Travel, Tourism and Pilgrimage and has been recognised by a number of photography prizes.

Diane Arbus' daring early work: 'It was a story that went untold, until now'

The Guardian
 
In 1970, Diane Arbus was a struggling magazine photographer in New York City. She wanted to make more money, so she put together a series of photos in a plexiglass box, which she called “A box of ten photographs by Diane Arbus”, priced at $1,000.

The photos highlight the outcasts of American society, such as giants, dwarves
and transvestites. Arbus’s photos shocked and disgusted art crowds to the point they were spat on when exhibited. As Norman Mailer observed: “Giving a camera to Diane Arbus is like putting a live grenade in the hands of a child.”...

Brassai: The ‘Eye of Paris’


The New York Times LENS Blog

It’s hard to be stuck in a studio while longing to enjoy life outside. Brassaï, famed for his classic images of Paris, was neither a photographer nor a Parisian — he wanted to be a painter. But once he arrived in Paris in 1924, he gave up his brushes. The fact was, he was so attracted to Parisian life that he said he had no interest in confining himself “to the four walls of an atelier all alone.”  

That sentiment and others cited in “Brassai,” a book recently released by Spain’s Fundación Mapfre, were most likely colored by Brassaï’s retrospective regret for not returning to painting. His legacy would come from his peregrinations outside the studio...  

So beautiful: the beauty of women in iconic images
 

The Eye of Photography

In focus galerie, in Cologne, Germany, offers at the moment an exhibition which is a tribute to the beauty of women. So beautiful takes the viewer on a journey from 1940 up to today to discover photographs – in humanist, fashion, or conceptual contexts – that focus on the beauty of women. It takes the liberty to focus on elegance and aesthetics in the #MeToo discussion and is also a reaction to the tendency in contemporary photography, to show every day and uninspired things and events.

Among the photographers are  Lillian Bassman, Edouard Boubat, Lucien Clergue, Elliott Erwitt, René Groebli, FC Gundlach, William Klein, Helmut Newton, Jeanloup Sieff and more. “It’s difficult with beauty, we’re not in agreement on what it should mean,” said artist Gerhard Richter in 2005. “Certainly it is also because the term beauty is so hackneyed or sounds like “the good” and ‘the true’. But that does not change the value of such ideal qualities and the fact that people need beauty. For me, beauty has always been a criterion for the quality of artwork, of whatever kind and from what ever time. Beauty is very simple, first of all it is the opposite of destruction and dissolution and damage, and with that it is inseparably connected with form, without which nothing can happen.”

The Woman Behind the First Photography Gallery


Aperture

Helen Gee risked everything to open Limelight in 1954, selling prints by Ansel Adams, Berenice Abbott, and Robert Frank for less than fifty dollars each. Her tell-all memoir, Helen Gee: Limelight, a Greenwich Village Photography Gallery and Coffeehouse in the Fifties, is now available from Aperture as an e-book. Here, Denise Bethel’s introduction offers a preview of the late Gee’s story...

Stanley Kubrick’s little-known life as a still photographer


The Washington Post

Most of us know Stanley Kubrick as the legendary director of some of cinema’s most significant, landmark films. When we see his name, we think of “2001: A Space Odyssey,” “A Clockwork Orange,” “Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb” or “The Shining.” What most of us probably don’t know is that he started his creative endeavors as a still photographer. Even more surprising, he started down that path as a precocious 17-year-old who eventually landed a job as a staff photographer for Look magazine, the storied pictorial competitor to Henry Luce’s Life. A new exhibit opening May 3 at the Museum of the City of New York titled “Through a Different Lens: Stanley Kubrick Photographs,” brings together more than 120 photos taken by Kubrick during that time. Cumulatively, this exhibit provides us with a glimpse of the creative force the young Kubrick was and the one that he would eventually become...


Hyperallergic

PARIS — Dada virtuoso Raoul Hausmann’s photographic oeuvre from 1927 to 1936 exposes his oddball art antics at play with naiveté. Arriving as Vision in Action at the Jeu de Paume from Le Point du Jour in Cherbourg are over 130 of his relatively undiscovered, vintage black-and-white photographs, curated by Dada doyen Cécile Bargues. Startlingly enough, some of the photographs by this dada-driven demon are rather banal, cliché, and even conventional, while others are typical of odd, avant-garde compositional ideas and outré experiences. Taken together, they indicate where this Vienna-born pioneer of cultural agitation, collage, photomontage, and sound poetry took refuge shortly after the Nazis’ rise to power...

Segregated Influences: Wendel White and Tya Alisa Anthony


Colorado Photographic Arts Center (CPAC)
Denver, CO
20 April - 2 June 2018


The Colorado Photographic Arts Center is pleased to present Segregated Influences, an exhibition that explores the complex history of race in America through the photographs of Wendel White, Distinguished Professor of Art at Stockton University, and Tya Alisa Anthony, a Denver-based visual artist.

In Schools for the Colored, White photographs the architectural remains of structures once used as segregated schools for African Americans in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois. The exhibition presents 20 black-and-white images of school buildings that appear isolated from their surrounding landscapes, which are obscured from view using digital techniques. This technique is a representation of W.E.B. DuBois’ famous concept of “the veil,” a metaphor for the divide that separates the lives of black and white Americans.

Anthony’s ongoing series, Complexion, confronts the results of colorism perpetuated within the history of the media. Colorism, distinct from racism, involves discrimination against persons based on skin tone, regardless of their perceived racial identity.

Drawing from the archives of the historically African-American lifestyle digest, Jet Magazine, Anthony investigates the contrast between images published in the 1950s and today. “Unlike today’s Jet Magazine filled with wealthy black celebrities of various skin tones, in the 1950s they printed much fairer skinned women of color with European-inspired hairstyles and created a complex relationship between what was ‘acceptable’ and reality,” writes Anthony.

Although each artist takes a vastly different approach, both artists use the power of photography to illuminate America’s complex history of race in ways that can help increase our understanding of social conditions today.

Abbas: 1944 – 2018


Magnum Photos

Magnum photographer Abbas has died in Paris on Wednesday April 25, 2018, at the age of 74. In a career that spanned six decades, he covered wars and revolutions in Biafra, Bangladesh, Northern Ireland, Vietnam, the Middle East, Chile, Cuba, and South Africa during apartheid. He also documented life in Mexico over several years, and pursued a lifelong interest in religion and its intersection with society.

Magnum’s current president Thomas Dworzak paid tribute to the veteran photographer, who for many at the agency has been both a friend and mentor:

“He was a pillar of Magnum, a godfather for a generation of younger photojournalists. An Iranian transplanted to Paris, he was a citizen of the world he relentlessly documented; its wars, its disasters, its revolutions and upheavals, and its beliefs – all his life. It is with immense sadness that we lose him. May the gods and angels of all the world’s major religions he photographed so passionately be there for him.”...

Stephen Shore


Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
New York, NY
Through 29 May 2018

Stephen Shore encompasses the entirety of the artist’s work of the last five decades, during which he has conducted a continual, restless interrogation of image making, from the gelatin silver prints he made as a teenager to his current engagement with digital platforms.

One of the most significant photographers of our time, Stephen Shore (American, b. 1947) has often been considered alongside other artists who rose to prominence in the 1970s by capturing the mundane aspects of American popular culture in straightforward, unglamorous images. But Shore has worked with many forms of photography, switching from cheap automatic cameras to large-format cameras in the 1970s, pioneering the use of color before returning to black and white in the 1990s, and in the 2000s taking up the opportunities of digital photography, digital printing, and social media.

The artist’s first survey in New York to include his entire career, this exhibition will both allow for a fuller understanding of Shore’s work, and demonstrate his singular vision—defined by an interest in daily life, a taste for serial and often systematic approaches, a strong intellectual underpinning, a restrained style, sly humor, and visual casualness—and uncompromising pursuit of photography’s possibilities.

Auction Results: The Knowing Eye, Photographs & Photobooks


Swann Auction Galleries

Emoi Photographique: the body from every angle


The Eye of Photography

L’Emoi Photographique (The Photographic Emotion) is a photography festival that takes place in Angouleme in France from March 24 to April 29, 2018. The festival this year has three guests: ORLAN, Joana Choumali and Gerard Chauvin. It offers a program of twenty-eight exhibitions around the theme “The body from every angle”. Twenty-eight exhibitions whose diversity is the essence of the festival. The Eye of Photography invites you to discover a selection of  photographs from the exhibition.